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Volume 23 



Dominican 
Monastic 
Search 





At the foot of the cross 

where Divine Fvalness 

povrs forth 



DOMINICAN 
MONASTIC 5LARCH 





Volume 25 



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DOMINICAN MONASTIC SEARCH 

Published by the Nuns of the Order of Preachers of North America 

Volume 23 2006 ISSN 1527-263X 

PRESIDENT 
Sr. Mary John, O.P., Lufkin, TX 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Sr. Mary Vincent, O. P., Farmington Hills, Ml Coordinator 
Sr. Mary Dominic, O.P., Elmira, NY Sr. Mary of the Savior, O.P., Farmington Hills, Ml 



Dominican Monastic Search is a spiritual and theological review written by the nuns. 
Its purpose is to foster the contemplative life by sharing of insights gained from prayer and 
study. It is published once a year as a service to the nuns of North America. It is also 
available to the wider Dominican Family and others upon request. A donation of $10.00 to 
aid in the cost of printing would be appreciated, when possible, from non-members. 

Dominican Monastic Search welcomes all its readers to contribute articles for 
publication. We ask that manuscripts be prepared with concern for literary and intellectual 
quality. Appropriate subjects include scripture, theology, philosophy, spirituality, Dominican 
§1 Life and the liberal arts insofar as they contribute to our Dominican vocation. Serious poetry 

" reflective of these categories may also be submitted, though only a small amount can be 

used. A theme for each issue is usually announced in advance, but is not intended to limit 
the scope of the articles. Before submitting a manuscript, please refer to the page of 
guidelines at the end of the most recent issue of DMS. 

Articles for publication and general correspondence should be sent to: 

Sr. Mary Vincent, O.P. 
Monastery of the Blessed Sacrament 
29575 Middlebelt Rd. 
Farmington Hills, Ml 48334-2311 
E-mail: mvincentopl 1 5(S)yahoo.com 

Donations and additions/changes for the mailing list should be sent to Sr. Mary Vincent, O.P. 
at the same address above. Make checks payable to Conference of Dominican Nuns. 

" NUNS OF THE ORDER OF PREACHERS 

OF NORTH AMERICA 






All Rights Reserved 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://archive.org/details/dominicanmonasti23unse 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Editorial 1 



Adoration: St. Dominic's Humble Prayer 

Sr. Mary Regina, O.P., Langley, BC, Canada 3 

Dominic and the Early Monastic Tradition 

Sr. Jean Marie, O.P., Langley, BC, Canada 8 

Dominic: You Could Have Turned Back 

Sr. Mary Vincent, O.P., Farmington Hills, Ml ....................... 14 

Mountain of Light A Poem 

Sr. Mary Angela, O.P., Langley, BC, Canada 19 

Catherine of Siena: Her Fellowship of Friends 

Sr. Mary Regina, O.P., Langley, BC, Canada 20 

Friendship Between St. Catherine of Siena and St. Agnes of Montepulciano 

Sr. Mary Agnes, O.P., Lufkin, TX 30 

Little Flowers of the Dominican Sisters 

Michal Sieykowski, O.P., trans. Matthew Rzeckowski, O.P. . 33 

Simon A Poem 

Sr. Maria Simona, O.P., Lufkin, TX 39 

Revisiting Familiar Territory: Tuning our Minds to our Voices 

Sr. Mary Magdalen Braun, O.P., Farmington Hills, Ml 40 

Listening To the Word of God 

Servais Pinckaers, O.P., trans. Sr. Mary Thomas, O.P 45 

Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: Parts III & IV Mark & John 

Sr. Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella, O.P., Farmington Hills, Ml 49 

Roots and Buds International 

Sr. Mary of God, O.P., North Guilford, CT 68 

Jerusalem A Poem 

Sr. Mary of the Compassion, O.P., Farmington Hills, Ml . 76 

T T ▼ 



INDEX OF AUTHORS 1980-2006 

Sr. Susan Early, O.P., North Guilford, CT 77 

INDEX OF TOPICS 1980-2006 

Sr. Susan Early, O.P., North Guilford, CT 89 



Guidelines for Contributors 108 



ART CREDITS 

Designed and Arranged by Sr. Clara Marie, O.P. 

Cover: Fresco by Fra Angelico 

Picture of St. Dominic's Nine Ways of Prayer - page 3 

Map of St. Dominic's travels - page 15 



FROM THE EDITOR 



As we know, this year of 2006 marks the 800 th anniversary of the founding of the 
first monastery of Dominican Nuns by St. Dominic, in Prouihle, France. He had begun his 
preaching mission with Diego, his bishop, in 1205, and by August of 1206, a building was 
begun for the eleven women who were the first happy fruits of hard work. The monastery 
was a modest one, completed by November 22 nd - feast of St. Cecilia, when the nuns moved 
to this new home of theirs. Approbation by the Holy See was granted December 22 nd and 
their enclosure was established, significantly, on the feast of the beloved apostle St. John, 
December 27 th 1206. 

Dominic loved these women. They had caught his fire, as he had caught Christ's. 
They were a sign of the Kingdom in the midst of a land torn apart by confusion, darkness 
and greed. These women were in earnest. They had sought in vain for the answer to the 
question "Why is there evil in the world?" Dominic led them to peace and joy and light 
where they in turn could become a light - could become a little kingdom - proclaiming to 
rich and poor alike that there is one God, one hope given by a Crucified Savior, true God 
and true Man, who did not disdain to enter our world and suffer with us our pain and 
struggle, and ultimately die for us. 

Dominic experienced his sisters' presence at Prouihle as a Seignadou - a sign from 
God - a light of faith, hope and charity, a light that still burns. This light is now our joy, 
privilege and responsibility. Dominic yet loves his nuns, his sisters, and looks to them for 
their prayer and penance and preaching. 

Dominican Monastic Search hopes to witness to this sacred trust and continue to 
share the fruits of living in "his garden, all broad, fragrant and joyous" (St Catherine). This 
issue, though not planned in the articles sent in, does providentially outline the major 
foundations of our vocation as Dominican nuns: 

♦ Dominic's extraordinary spirit of prayer ever undergirded his "incredible yearning for 
the salvation of all." 

♦ Dominic's desert spirit, that blossomed into wisdom, joy, courage and missionary 
zeal; 

♦ Dominic's struggles that were the test and means to victory; he is a well-tried 
champion; 

♦ Catherine of Siena, one of Dominic's greatest daughters; her growth, her many 
wonderful friendships that were truly a sign of the Kingdom in a time of great turmoil; 

♦ Catherine and Agnes and their love and union in prayer and desires; 

♦ Many faithful sisters, just like us - full of faith and courage; 

♦ The Prayer of the Divine Office - Dominic's great passion and ours; 

♦ Encouragement to "Listen to God's Word" as did Dominic and our sisters of old, to 
listen, to learn, so as to worship and proclaim the truth; 

♦ Brilliant light of Mark and John; the unfathomable Gospel message, foundation of 
our faith and consecrated life; 

♦ History of the International Commission of Nuns; the nuns number over two hundred 
monasteries across the world and seek to unite in common goals and concerns. 
One mind and one heart in the Lord. 

♦ Poems which sing their own song of dedication to Christ, to Dominic and Jerusalem 
- city of peace. 



I thank my co-editors for their great help and support. My thanks also to Sr. Susan 
Early and Sr. Dominic in completing the Index of all the articles of DMS from 1980 to 
2006 (author and topic), and I thank each one who contributed to this 2006 issue. 
Please be encouraged to share your studies in Dominican Monastic Search, by articles, 
poetry, translations or book reviews, art work, drawings or calligraphy. If you have any 
suggestions for a theme, please let me know. Since our 800 th commemoration and 
celebration will extend to 2007 we will hope for articles on Laudare, Benedicere, 
Praedicare and the spirit of joy which is so great a part of our Dominican vocation. 

May our blessed father St. Dominic bless us and strengthen us to faithfully walk with 
him and all our sisters of these 800 grace-filled years! 

Sincerely and gratefully in St. Dominic, 

Sr. Mary Vincent, O. P. 
Coordinating Editor 
Farmington Hills, Ml 




ADORATION 

St. Dominic's Humble Prayer 



Sister Mary Regina, O.P. 
Langley, B.C., Canada 



Before reading this short essay on the way St. Dominic prayed his humble prayer of 
adoration, we would do well to gaze for at least two or three minutes on this depiction of the 
"Nine Ways of St. Dominic's Prayer." Go from one frame to the next slowly to observe all you 
can, the similarities and differences, in each box. Notice the inclinations, genuflections, 
supplications, prostrations, contemplation, lectio divina, penance earnest intercession and 
praying on a journey. Notice that each depiction illustrates the use of the body. Then 
continue with the text. 1 



Adoration in the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas: 

There is an excellent text on the prayer of adoration, written by St. Thomas Aquinas 
in his Summa Theologiae that offers us clear insights into the dynamic prayer of St. Dominic. 
The postures he took in his night vigils particularly, demonstrate the clear working of God in 
the many forms in which he adored the Lord. St. Thomas teaches that adoration or 
reverence is due according to the degree of the dignity of the one whom we honor. When 
homage is due the king and when homage is due God, the two levels of reverence are quite 
different. Strictly speaking we adore only God (latria). Since God is of the very highest 
excellence, He deserves the greatest adoration. 2 We reverence or pay tribute to creatures 
{dulia) only out of respect for their dignity. 



reverence is due according to the degree of the dignity of the one whom we honor. When 
homage is due the king and when homage is due God, the two levels of reverence are quite 
different. Strictly speaking we adore only God (latria). Since God is of the very highest 
excellence, He deserves the greatest adoration. 2 We reverence or pay tribute to creatures 
(dulia) only out of respect for their dignity. 

Notice that with both God and persons we pay respect by an external act, for 
adoration and respect are acknowledged as external virtues. There is proportion and 
distinction here, since God is to be honored above all his creation. These external acts give 
evidence of our interior disposition, and thus become prayer when directed to God. 
Furthermore, the use of the body is most proper to adoration and an absolute necessity for 
this form of prayer. St. Thomas explains this well: "Since we are composed of a twofold 
nature, intellectual and sensible, we offer God a twofold adoration; namely, a spiritual 
adoration, consisting in the internal devotion of the mind; and a bodily adoration, which 
consists in an external humbling of the body." 3 Notice that Thomas uses the word "humble" 
with regard to adoration of God. A deep humility is extremely necessary. 



The Prayer of St. Dominic: 

Let us pause a moment here to gaze once again at the depiction of The Nine Ways 
of St. Dominic's Prayer to observe our father and founder in the context of adoration. The 
English Dominican and former Master of the Order, Bede Jarrett, O.P., writes of Dominic as 
he ponders the saint's prayer: "He must first be ablaze himself. Nor can he allow himself the 
sole enjoyment of his fire; he may not shield a guarded flame." 4 The stage is set. We now 
look at Dominic's prayer of adoration to make it our own, and to allow ourselves to be filled 
with the blazing fire of devotion. However, making Dominic's prayer ours, we must take a 
magnifying glass to his, which had such great impact on others and on history, particularly 
the history of religion. 

We might ask, what is this fire, this adoration? The prayer of adoration Dominic 
offered day and night, particularly at his night vigils, was the prayer of his mind, of his inner 
heart and of the various postures we find in The Nine Ways. What St. Thomas speaks of 
with regard to humble adoration, is precisely what we see here in St. Dominic's prayer. 
Thomas says, "...we exhibit signs of humility in our bodies in order to incite our affections to 
submit to God, since it is connatural to us to proceed from the sensible to the intellectual." 5 
Bede Jarrett complements the teaching of St. Thomas when he writes, "The tendency of 
study by itself is simply to dry up the emotional side of human nature." 6 We must remember 
that the Dominican Order has a great respect for the human intelligence and supports 
doctrinal endeavor and study, but we have this example of Dominic who balanced the 
intellectual with remarkable devotion as is illustrated in the various forms of adoration during 
his humble prayer. 

Very often St. Dominic prayed in the Church, for he had a special love for the altar. 
We find him too in the Studium of the convent, interrupting and intermingling his study and 
lectio divina for spells of adoration. Dominic walked much from village, to town, to city, and 
during his journeys he would again become absorbed in his prayer and his postures of 
prayer as he walked and sang in what Bede Jarrett calls his "lyric note of gladness." 7 When 
his prayer became so intense, he would walk ahead of the Brothers a bit, to adore the Lord 
and honor Mary (hyper dulia) with chants and hymns, such as the Ave Maris Stella and the 



Salve Regina, allowing the words to enwrap his body and his surroundings as he gave 
praise to God for the one who bore the Eternal Word and gave him to us for our veneration. 

In "The Nine Ways of St. Dominic's Prayer," these windows into his adoration of God, 
we see a creative variety of movements: His initial posture was to bow low to humble 
himself, saying, O Lord God, the prayer of the humble and the meek has always pleased 
you (Judith 9:16). He would lie with his face flat on the floor in worship. He would scourge 
himself while reciting the Miserere (Psalm 51) and the De Profundus (Psalm 129), indicating 
the penance and sacrifice that is proper to religious life. He would stand straight, filled with 
awe and adoration of Christ of whom the altar was a significant symbol. He would again 
stand, and letting his hands take different forms: sometimes a position of pleading for the 
needs and sins of the people whom he carried in his compassionate heart; at other times his 
hands were folded as the two covers of a book that contained lessons in charity, that true 
love of God and neighbor that had taught him everything. In a moment his hands would 
reach to the very heavens, well above his tonsured head, his body and spirit indicating the 
presence of God. In short, when we take a serious look at "The Nine Ways," we recognize 
them unquestionably and predominantly as prayers and postures of pure adoration of God 
and concentrated acts of reverence. 



The Albigensian Heresy: 

We must take time here to speak of a terrible and noxious heresy that is the very 
antithesis of postures of prayer and the use of the body so proper to adoration. The 
Albigensian heresy, rampant in northern Italy and southern France during this time, stands 
as a hideous contrast to the prayer of adoration that Dominic prayed and Thomas taught. 
This will be clear almost immediately as we look quickly at the most salient and senseless 
tenets: 

The devil, they said, is creator of matter; he is a real god. 

♦ The Christian God is the creator of spirit-being only. 

♦ The human soul that had been created good had rebelled and was 
expelled from heaven. The devil imprisoned the soul in matter. 

♦ Salvation for the soul consists in liberation from all matter, which 
includes the body, to return to its original heavenly state. 8 

Further, this heresy refused to accept Christ as God. He was merely an angelic spirit 
whose body had only a corporal appearance. 

Now it becomes clear why the Holy Spirit inspired St. Dominic to use his body so 
very much in his prayer, for God is the creator and fashioner of all things, especially in his 
masterpiece, his Son, Jesus: He (Christ) is the image of the unseen God, the first-born of all 
creation, for in him were created all things in heaven and on earth: everything visible and 
everything invisible (Col. 1:15-16). 

The Albigensian teaching on salvation could not have been more erroneous. Real 
salvation brings real liberation, not from matter, which is good, but from sin, which is evil. 
Dominic understood all this so keenly that his very own body preached against this 
menacing heresy when he engaged in prayer. The very fact that Dominic prayed before the 
crucifix or before the altar, the symbol of Christ and of his sacrifice, attests to his belief that 
Christ came to save, not to enslave. He came in our flesh, a body like our own. 



St. Dominic, of course, believed in the true Christianity which Bede Jarrett says, 
"...rests upon the Incarnation of the Son of God, the marriage of matter and spirit of the 
divine and the human, for the Word became Flesh." 9 The Albigensian heresy, declaring all 
matter unclean and evil, sank ever deeper into error when they said: "The only real act of 
goodness was the getting rid of life." 10 According to this bizarre heresy, the married state 
rendered salvation impossible, and parentage was utterly abhorred. To bring this to total 
absurdity, suicide was held in honor as virtue. "Their prayer," says Bede Jarrett, "was 
abstraction from consciousness." 11 All of this was a repudiation of life, natural and 
supernatural, of the true faith and of the sacraments. 

The sacraments, we must remember, are realities of sacred action and abundant 
grace, under matter and form. Every sacrament has to do with matter, our body, and the life 
of God's grace working at the moment of the reception of the sacrament. If we take one 
example, Baptism; water is poured over the person or there is immersion in water, signifying 
the saving and sacred action of God: Unless a man be born again of water and the Spirit, he 
cannot enter the kingdom of God (Jn 3:5). The sacrament of Baptism, like all the 
sacraments, "preach" against this heresy and all heresies, since the sacraments bring us 
into the presence of the unseen God, the God who enters every event of our lives, with 
additional graces for these most important events. In Baptism, for example, we become 
children of God and heirs of heaven. 



St. Dominic, Champion of the Incarnation: 

Those involved in the Abligensian heresy practiced unreasonable and dreadful 
austerity, for they hated the body. It must be stated that, yes, Dominic was a man of 
austerity, which is mentioned repeatedly in the acts of his canonization. So too did he, and 
the early Dominicans, engage in fasting. However, this was never a denial of his body or of 
our gifted humanity. St. Dominic could bow low before God at the altar because he was a 
champion of the Incarnation, a defender of the true faith, a man of sacrificial offering after 
Christ himself, an expositor of the sacraments and a man who loved humanity profoundly. 
He was a man of life, not a man of hopelessness. As has been recorded from testimonies of 
those who knew him, he was seen now with tears, now with laughter, now with compassion, 
now with generosity and total giving of his time and his few precious possessions, as when 
he gave his priceless scriptures to be sold to feed the victims of the plague. His austerities 
were a result of a heart full of tremendous love, and at the centre of his intention with regard 
to all penance was the salvation of souls, that all might be saved and come to God. His 
emotions, spent for this same noble motive, poured out copiously in mercy and compassion 
for all persons made in the image and likeness of God. 

All of this has everything to do with the prayer of adoration, a prayer that is the more 
humble as it recognizes the greatness of God who is to be worshiped and praised, for who 
he is and for his saving work of Redemption. St. Dominic participated beautifully in this 
saving work of God in various ways and at various times. Jordan of Saxony tells us that 
when Dominic died and his body lay in state, many people came to show their devotion and 
reverence: "Day and night the sick and the infirm came and remained to tell that they had 
been restored to health. As witness to their cures, they hung over the tomb of this blessed 
man waxen replicas of (their) eyes, hands, feet, and other parts of the body, depending on 
the infirmity and the parts of the body restored to health." 12 



We repeat the question: how can we be ablaze with the fire of St. Dominic now that 
we have studied his inner fire? 

- We can be more mindful that postures of prayer signify our worship of God and that every 
time we genuflect or perform any of these postures, we give witness to our faith. 

- We can side with Truth on every level, study the creeds of our faith and place these in 
relationship with current thought in the world of society and religion. We can be champions 
of the Incarnation. 

- We can be mindful of the tenets of the sixteen great heresies of Christian history 
( www.carm.org ) to counteract them personally through our faith in God as three persons in 
one God, and in our firm belief that Jesus is true God and true man; we can live the 
apostle's creed every day of our life. 

- We can seek ways to endorse the gospel of life, the dignity of the human person and the 
dignity of the human body. 

- We can assist those who suffer, as St. Dominic did, ever mindful of the poor, the sick, 
those in need of a compassionate heart. 

- We can study The Nine Ways of St. Dominic's Prayer to put all, or some, or even just one 
into practice on a regular basis, realizing that kneeling and sitting in a contemplative manner 
are always postures of adoration. 

In conclusion, let us take one more glance at St. Dominic. An anonymous author of 
these pictures that we have studied wrote the following in which it is not difficult to see the 
reward of his prayer: the wisdom and understanding of God and of the Scriptures. It all 
comes from worship and adoration: "The brethren thought that it was while praying in this 
way that the saint obtained his extensive penetration of Sacred Scripture and profound 
understanding of the divine words, the power to preach so fervently and courageously, and 
that intimate acquaintance with the Holy Spirit by which he came to know the hidden things 
of God." 13 



http://www.op.org/scotty/9way/ 

S.T. II-II, q. 84, art. 1, Note: St. Thomas uses the word latria for the adoration and praise we render to God, dulia 
for the respect we pay to persons and hyperdulia for the honor we give to Mary. 
3 Ibid. 

Bede Jarrett, OP, Life of St. Dominic (Washington, D.C. / Chicago: Dominican Publications), 89. (Reprint from 
Image Books and Paulist Press.) 

5 S.T. II-II, q. 84, art 2. 

6 Jarrett, 89. 

7 Jarrett, 93. 

8 New Catholic Encyclopaedia (N.Y., St Louis: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966), 262. 

9 Jarrett, 28. 

10 Ibid. 
"Ibid. 

12 Francis C. Lehner, O.P., Saint Dominic (Washington, D.C: Thomist Press, 1964), 74 ("Libellus of Jordan of 
Saxony," #97). 



13 



Ibid., "The Nine Ways of Prayer of St. Dominic," 159. (Note: Another excellent translation with sketches of "The 



Nine Ways of Prayer of St. Dominic:" Simon Tugwell, O.P., Dublin: Dominican Publication, 1978). 



DOMINIC AND THE EARLY MONASTIC TRADITION 



Sister Jean Marie, OP 
Langley, B.C., Canada 



Introduction 



We have all read that Dominic treasured three books as particularly influential for his 
spiritual life: The Conferences of Cassian, The Gospel of Matthew and the Letters of St. 
Paul; we need to include also the book of Psalms which formed the wellspring of his 
liturgical prayer. These books are listed as the sources of inspiration for St. Dominic. 1 In this 
paper I would like to reflect on how these sources, especially the teaching in the 
Conferences, are replicated in the example of Dominic's life. 



Dominic and Desert Spirituality 

St. Dominic's holiness has the stamp of desert spirituality. At Osma, The 
Conferences of Cassian were his guide in the spiritual life. He learned from them the 
struggle with sinfulness and weakness and the life of virtue which leads to perfection. 
Blessed Jordan writes: 

He loved to read the book called the Conferences of the Fathers, which 
deals with vices and with all matters of spiritual perfection. The paths of 
salvation outlined therein he carefully studied and tried to imitate with 
all the strength of his soul. Along with the help of grace, this book 
refined the purity of his conscience, intensified the light of his 
contemplation, and raised him to a high level of perfection. 2 

Certain characteristics stand out as we study some of the great figures of the early 
monastic movement, as described in Cassian and in other sources. Outstanding among 
these characteristics: asceticism, separation, renunciation, total surrender to Christ, all of 
which are means to the goal of purity of heart and the reign of God. What strikes one is the 
seriousness, tenacity, and unflagging dedication with which these men and women of the 
early desert tradition undertook the task of purification and transformation. When one or 
another flagged they were encouraged by the abba, and their brothers and sisters, 
predominantly through example, and by the Word of God, -- read, memorized and mediated 
through the men and women of experience and wisdom. 

The literature of the desert is about living the Christian life in its essentials, stripping 
away all but the basic principles of living a Gospel life; seeking God and losing the self in 
order to be redeemed and transformed. The central teaching of the desert is the theme of 
reality, the stripping of illusion, the continuous life-long struggle to see God, to become the 
friend of God. All ascetic effort, personal relationship, life in all its aspects were to be brought 
into the central relationship with God in Christ. The great virtues of the desert are: humility, 
discretion, realism, the "single eye" of a life directed to God. Dominic burned with this same 
zeal for holiness and unflaggingly sought transformation through renunciation and poverty, 
so that he might "see God." Jordan writes of his zeal: 



Because he embraced the Lord's commandments with such burning 
love and listened to the Spouse's voice with the very pious approval of 
his good will, the God of the sciences increased his grace, so that he 
became able, not only to receive the milk of doctrine, but also to make 
a deep penetration of difficult questions through the humble 
understanding of his heart and consume the more solid food of mystery 
with sufficient ease. 3 



Following of Christ 

The Conferences are perhaps best seen as maps of the spiritual life. Cassian's 
Spiritual Theology is Christocentric. Christ pervades his teaching on contemplation, chastity, 
prayer and spiritual knowledge. The Christological foundations of his work are firm, as is his 
eschatological foundations. 

In the Conferences there are numerous citations of the Gospels and the teaching of 
St. Paul, with reference to the following of Christ and imitation of his example and virtue. For 
Cassian, "everything which concerns salvation was given... by the Lord." 4 There is a 
dynamism inherent in the ascetic life that drives one forward. Radical simplicity and integrity 
is the principal aim of the desert dwellers. Their radicality centered in the daily seeking to lay 
aside everything to be transformed in Christ. 

Dominic was moved by his love for Jesus Christ, as one who wanted to put on Christ 
and to become one with the Savior for the sake of all men and women. Catherine of Siena 
described Dominic as taking up the task of the Word. 5 



The Scripture 

St. Dominic's love for Scripture found a profound support in the desert tradition. The 
Psalms were used by the early monks both for the weekly synaxis and for their prayer alone 
in their cells. They were in their hearts and on their lips as they sought perfection and cried 
out for salvation. Repetition of the words of the Psalms was a means to fix their minds on 
God; the rhythm of Scripture verses and especially the Psalms formed the life of unceasing 
prayer for which the monks strove. 

For St. Antony, the archetype of the early desert tradition, Scripture played a 
prominent role. The words of Jesus in the Gospel started him on his journey. The first part of 
that journey was evangelical - hearing and needing God's call to live a Gospel life. The 
second was leave-taking, separating oneself from those things that pulled away from God. 
The monk is pre-eminently one who seeks to live by the Word of God. The life of Antony and 
the Sayings of the Fathers reflect the great authority of Scripture and its centrality in the 
quest for salvation. 

The value of Scripture was almost always seen in very practical terms relating to 
salvation and self-knowledge. The Word aided in the battle with the demons; brought 
healing, and encouragement. It was used to conquer "thoughts," those movements of the 
mind and heart which distracted the monk from the one thing necessary. The Word of God 
brought salvation and transformation. 



Jordan writes of Dominic that he was drawn to savor the word of God. In his studies 
at Palencia Dominic broke open the Word, studied with "continual eagerness, to drink from 
the streams of Sacred Scripture." 6 The study reverberated in his innermost being and 
prepared him, like Antony, for his future call as founder and preacher. Dominic was called by 
the Word to be a "doer of the word" for God's glory and the salvation of all. 

For the men and women of the desert, hearing the Word was insufficient if the word 
did not enter into the heart and transform them. To "hear" carried the connotation of 
completion in transformation. Hearing the word was a process into which they entered. 
There are numerous examples of one word being heard and lived with, for a year or more, 
until it entered into the heart and became a lived reality. Only then was another word sought 
from the Abba and the process began again. Jordan of Saxony takes up this same theme 
when he writes: 

...there are two ways of keeping God's word, namely, one whereby we 
store in our memory whatever we hear, and the other whereby we put 
into practice what we have heard (and none will deny that the latter is 
more commendable, inasmuch as it is better to sow grain than to keep 
it stored in the barn). This happy servant of God failed in neither. 7 

To be a "doer of the word," or rather the deep faith that the Word was alive and could 
transform, was essential to the spirituality of the desert. The monks staked their whole life 
and endeavour on this truth. The Word of God for them was not a book one read, it was 
"active and alive," transforming mind and heart; thus could a monk ponder and remain with a 
single word or phrase of Scripture until its teaching was absorbed into his life. 

The Word of God had this same living reality for Dominic. He was a man obedient to 
God, one who listened attentively to the Word, one directed by the Spirit of God, and one 
transformed by the Word he heard. The Scripture was the word of Christ; and the work of 
the Holy Spirit was to teach and make real in the heart of the disciple Jesus' word. The 
Gospel, for Dominic was the book of life. His principal commitment was to preach the Word 
of God. His was a missionary vocation and his task was to bring salvation to all men and 
women. Dominic's appropriation of the Word defined his vocation and separated him from all 
that was not God's will for him. He sought no lasting city in this life and became a stranger 
for Christ's sake. His vocation entailed proclaiming the Gospel in all its fullness, and to 
teaching its truth. 



Compunction 

Compunction, a tremendously important virtue in the early tradition, can be defined 
as a condition of the heart: a heart seeking God, profoundly aware of its sin, and the need of 
God's infinite grace and mercy. Compunction is seen as sorrow at the prospect of losing 
eternal salvation for oneself or others. The experiential knowledge of ones own insufficiency 
and sinfulness, ones inability to attain salvation without grace, gives the monk a heart of 
compassion for the struggles of others, especially in the light of forgiveness, healing and 
conversion. In Conference 11, we read: 

When then any one has acquired this love of goodness of which we 
have been speaking, and the imitation of God, then he will be endowed 



io 



with the Lord's heart of compassion, and will pray also for his 
persecutors, saying in like manner: Father, forgive them, for they know 
not what they do (Lk 23:34). But it is a clear sign of a soul that is not yet 
thoroughly purged from the dregs of sin, not to sorrow with a feeling of 
pity at the offences of others, but to keep to the rigid censure of the 
judge: for how will he be able to obtain perfection of heart, who is 
without that by which, as the Apostle has pointed out, the full 
requirements of the law can be fulfilled, saying: Bear one another's 
burdens and so fulfil the law of Christ (Gal 6:2). 8 

When one reflects on the whole theme of compunction in the early tradition, its 
importance recorded in the sayings of the Fathers and Mothers, Dominic comes strongly to 
mind. What effect did these words have on Dominic, whose outstanding characteristic was 
compassion, so frequently witnessed to by those who knew him? The witnesses at the 
canonization process speak of his great love and compassion, principally for those in need. 
We are told that he was always cheerful, except when moved to compassion at the sight of 
someone's affliction, yet he always remained at the same time a man of joy. One of the 
witnesses remembers that: 

Filled with compassion, he most ardently desired his neighbor's 
salvation. He himself preached constantly and frequently, and in every 
way he could exhorted the brethren to preach. He sent them out to 
preach, begging and urging them to be solicitous for the salvation of 
souls. 9 

Dominic experienced profound sorrow at the remembrance of his sins and deep compassion 
at the knowledge of the sin that bound others. When at prayer during the night hours, he 
often manifested the intensity of his feeling with loud groans and supplication, accompanied 
by copious tears. In the desert, tears flowing from the inner depths of a person were a sign 
of true compassion. 10 When Dominic wept, which was frequently, he moved others to tears. 
He often wept when preaching; those listening were stirred to tears and conversion. 



Purity of Heart / Unceasing Prayer 

A basic requirement of the quest for holiness is intensity of purpose, an unwavering 
focus to which the monks continually returned. Cassian speaks of the importance of knowing 
the goal and keeping it ever before us on the spiritual quest. Cassian teaches that the near 
or proximate goal of the monk is purity of heart. Purity of Heart is the centerpiece of his 
monastic theology. Purity of Heart involves an inner openness, emptiness, a transparency 
toward God and the things of God. It's attainment, the highest perfection in this life and a 
preparation for the ultimate goal of eternally sharing in the life of the Triune God. The early 
literature presumed that purity of heart could be realized by obedience to God and through 
the grace of the Holy Spirit. 

Of supreme importance in the desert tradition was personal integrity before God, 
without any disguises or pretensions. Integrity is the mark of holiness. In a person of integrity 
there is no duplicity of the inner life of mind and heart and the outer life of word and actions. 
The words and actions of the person of holiness reflected the inner life of the heart. Jordan 
writes of Dominic's that his memory "was a storehouse of divine things ... and his external 
words and character clearly bespoke what lay hidden within his sacred breast." 11 It is 



11 



abundantly clear by what was written of Dominic - his holiness, his transparency, his 
immense freedom -- that he had attained purity of heart. He stood before God in every 
situation, attuned to God's will. Everything flowed from his union with God in Christ. The 
attainment of such union the early tradition considered the angelic life. 

Dominic knew well his goal and never lost sight of it. He has been described as 
perspicacious, one who is insightful and astute. Dominic was characterized by breadth of 
vision, clear-sightedness and great-heartedness. He balanced all the observances of the 
Order in the light of the immediate goal: preaching the Word for the salvation of all men and 
women. His immediate goal for the Order found fruition only in the ultimate goal of eternal 
life. 

Purity of heart and a life of unceasing prayer are synonymous. And Dominic was truly 
a man of unceasing prayer. The diverse elements that made up Dominic's day found their 
unity in his union with God. His humble, intense prayer was an almost unbroken 
conversation with our Lord Jesus Christ, both by day and by night. Jordan of Saxony gives 
us insight into Dominic's prayer when he writes: 

It was his custom to spend his night-watches in prayer and, having shut 
the door, to pray to the Father in secret.... His frequent and special 
prayer to God was for the gift of true charity capable of laboring for and 
procuring the salvation of men, since he deemed that he would be a 
true member of Christ only when he could devote himself entirely to 
winning souls, like the Lord Jesus, the Savior of all men, Who offered 
Himself completely for our salvation. 12 



Radiant Presence 

In the Old Testament, the radiance of Moses' face gave testimony to his encounter 
with God. St. Paul speaks of Moses' veiled face and teaches that the ministry of the spirit in 
the Christian dispensation will be even more glorious (2 Cor 3:8). 

How does one explain the immense radiance and attraction of the desert dwellers? 
In the desert, tenacity and firmness to the "discipline" of life blossoms in joy; and dying, into 
the radiant sharing of the resurrection anticipated now and possessed fully in the reign of 
God for all eternity. 13 Think of Antony emerging from his fort, after twenty years of 
confronting the demons and living an extreme ascetic life, healthy and radiant with the 
reflected glory of God's inner presence and tremendous love for his neighbor. 14 Antony's 
overriding virtue in later life was not fasting/asceticism but his sociability: a magnetic charm, 
openness to all, such that he drew disciples and crowds of visitors. He was recognized as 
one whose heart had achieved total transparency to others. Something not possible without 
self-denial and losing the self. 

Jordan describes Dominic as one truly filled with the spirit of God. Sister Cecilia, a 
Dominican nun who knew St. Dominic, writes: "From out his forehead and between his 
eyebrows a radiant light shone forth, which drew everyone to revere and love him." 15 

From his brow and eyes emanated a kind of radiance which drew 
everyone to revere and love him. Dominic was genial in his relationship 
with others. The impression he made was one of strong magnetism, a 



12 



unique charm which radiated from his person. He was pleasant and 
affable. He was friendly to all, peaceable 



16 



A contemplative by night, he was an apostle during the day. We are told that his 
countenance was always open and joyful, a man wholly turned outward to others. Joy, true 
inner joy, radiance, overflowing in goodness and love are certainly Gospel characteristics. 
Dominic, like Antony radiated the presence of God, one who had been "Christed" and a 
"Word" of salvation for others. 



Conclusion 

The desert tradition is part of our heritage as Dominican nuns. LCM 35. I tells 
us that our observance: 

adopted by St. Dominic from tradition or newly created by him, fosters the 
way of life of the nuns by helping them in their determination to follow Christ 
more closely and enabling them to live more effectively their contemplative 
life in the Order of Preachers. 

Dominic wanted this tradition, formative of his own life and holiness, to be decisive for his 
followers. He wanted us to take seriously and to enter into the way of "discipline" in such a 
way that we too would be transformed. Along with the early monastics and Dominic let us 
enter whole-heartedly into the rhythm of our Dominican monastic life, not as observers but 
as involved and active participants whose lives are focused on the task of holiness and who 
seek with intensity of purpose "to see God." 



1 See Guy Bedouelle, O.P., Saint Dominic: The Grace of the Word (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1982), 
89-103:215-220. 

2 Saint Dominic: Biographical Documents, ed. Francis C. Lehner, O.P. (Washington, D.C.: The Thomist 
Press, 1964); Jordan of Saxony/'Libellus," #13. 

3 Ibid., #7. 

4 The Conferences ofCassian, ed. Boniface Ramsey (New York: Paulist Press, 1997, Conference III, 
Chapter 16. 



6 



The Dialogue of St Catherine, ed. Suzanne Noffke, O.P. (NY: Paulist Press, 1980), 337. 
Biographical Documents, "Libellus," cf. #6, 7. 



7 Ibid. 

8 Ramsey, Conference XI. 

9 Biographical Documents, "Canonization at Bologna," #26, 115, Brother John of Spain. 

10 George A. Maloney, S.J., "Penthos - Forgotten Necessity," Monastic Studies 7(1969), 149-159. 



11 Biographical Documents, "Libellus," #7. 

12 Ibid, #13. 

13 The term "discipline" was used in the early desert tradition to mean all the observances of the life 
undertaken by the monk which lead to union with God in Christ. 

14 The Life of Antony and the Letter to Marcellinus, trans. Robert C. Gregg (New York: Paulist Press, 1980), 
#14. 

15 See Lehner, Biographical Documents, "Miracles of St. Dominic," #15, 183-184. 

16 See Bedouelle, 95. Beduelle puts together several references from the Canonization process of St. 
Dominic. 



13 



DOMINIC: YOU COULD HAVE TURNED BACK 



Sister Mary Vincent, O.P. 
Farmington Hills, Ml 



We do not hear of a dramatic conversion story in any of the accounts of St Dominic's 
life, yet in every life there are contrary winds, crises, and crossroads. With all that St. 
Dominic accomplished in his very brief life of about 49 years, he could have — at any point -- 
turned back. 

Dominic was born about 1170 in Caleruega of Old Castile, southern Spain, rugged 
country even to this day. The legendary figure, the Cid Campeador, had just recently freed 
Spain of the attacks of the Moors and that new-found freedom of life and love of the Faith 
was in the air that the young Dominic breathed. We do not know much of his early life. 
Tradition tells us that his noble mother, Jane of Aza carefully reared her children. Early 
educated by an uncle who was a priest, Dominic went on to the University of Palencia to 
study everything that was offered to him: history, mathematics, astronomy, Latin, dialectics, 
philosophy and theology. His family must have had means to be able to provide this 
education and we are told Dominic had books: priceless, hand-made books. Blessed Jordan 
tells in his Libellus: 

He began to develop a passionate appetite for God's words, finding them 
"sweeter than honey to his mouth." His eagerness to imbibe the streams of 
holy Scripture was so intense and so unremitting that he spent whole nights 
almost without sleep, so untiring was his desire to study... and the truth was 
stored away.... 1 

Dominic could have lessened this ardor and interest. Was it worth it? He was, no 
doubt, exhausted in the mornings. The pastimes of the young invited him. His companions 
did not much share his enthusiasm. But he did not turn back. There was a severe famine in 
almost all of Spain. Dominic sold his annotated books. Hours of labor at night, as the candle 
burned low, gathering information and painstakingly writing it down in costly and uncommon 
volumes -- given away that hungry people might be fed. Dominic was not the cold, budding 
Inquisitor, but a sensitive, feeling young man who noticed and cared for those in need. Now 
without his books, but with a good conscience and clear purpose, he did not turn back. 

The bishop of the area, venerable Diego of Osma heard about Dominic and invited 
him to join the Canons Regular at the Cathedral Church. Diego was pursuing a reform and 
greater discipline. Dominic wanted to be a priest, but a canon of St. Augustine? A secular 
priest could have a more free life. Then there were the Benedictines of Silos to whom 
Dominic's mother had carried him before he was born and often no doubt, during his 
childhood. In the face of opposite attractions, Dominic chose the life of the Canon. He 
"haunted the church by day and by night, devoting himself ceaselessly to prayer and 
contemplation" (Libellus, #12). This was a young man, full of passion and yearning for God. 
There could have been outlets, compromises. He did not turn back. 



14 



We are fortunate to have a description of Dominic given to us by a nun who knew 
him. Sr. Cecilia writes: 

The blessed Dominic was of medium height and of slight build. His 
countenance was beautiful, of fair complexion, with light auburn hair and 
beard and luminous eyes. A kind of radiance shone from his brow, inspiring 
love and reverence in all. Full of joy, he seemed ever ready to smile, unless 
moved to compassion by the affliction of his neighbor. His hands were long 
and shapely, his voice strong, noble and sonorous. He was never bald, and 
his tonsure was complete, sprinkled with a few white hairs. 2 

So this man Dominic was very attractive, with an easy elegance and grace. Before he died 
he told his brothers he found young women very attractive. Some of the worried brethren, for 
a time excised this confession from the records. But it remains as a truthful acknowledgment 
of his humanness. Dominic had felt the attraction and passion of a lover. Even so, he did not 
turn back. Christ was his great love. 

We are even more fortunate to have a favorite and special prayer that Dominic often 
prayed. Jordan, knowing the power and secret it revealed, took pains to record it: 

He [Dominic] had a special prayer which he often made to God, that God 
would grant him true charity which would be effective in caring for and 
winning the salvation of men; he thought he would only really be a member of 
Christ's Body when he could spend himself utterly with all his strength in the 
winning of souls, just as the Lord Jesus Christ, the Savior of us all, gave 
himself up without reserve for our salvation (Libellus, #13). 

Fr. Simon Tugwell, O.P. says "it is hard to avoid the impression that for him (Jordan) this 
special prayer at Osma in some way provides the key to his (Dominic's) subsequent life." 3 
Jesus Christ was the center of his life, its driving force, the wisdom he ever sought, the truth 
he lived by and yearned to impart. 

Dominic's life was Christ; his ardent prayer was a pleading for true charity; notice the 
adjective "true." Dominic did not want gifts, but THE gift that would achieve something for 
God. He was pressing forward, looking for the springs of life - Christ and the charity that 
flowed from this Divine Fountain. Immersed in this Fountain Dominic could do great things 
for God. He was never ashamed to beg - especially for the charity that walked, worked, 
transformed people's minds, hearts and lives. "/ can do all things in him who strengthens 
me, to bring all to immortal happiness as a living part of Christ." 4 "Another himself as the 
Eternal Father would later reveal to St. Catherine. Here burned Dominic's desire. Here his 
gaze was ever focused: on the One who gave everything and gives everything now. Utterly 
like Jesus who was without reserve for us - Dominic would not turn back. 

Indeed I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing 
Jesus Christ my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and 
count them as refuse, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him.... 
Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect; but I press on to 
make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own... brethren... our 
commonwealth is in /7eaven...(Phil 3: 8,9,12, 20). 5 



15 



Dominic's prayer pressed for an answer. And he received it in a surprising turn of 
events -- a trip across Europe with Bishop Diego. Travel was slow and arduous, but it 
revealed needs, more desperate than he or his bishop could have imagined: anarchy, 
confusion, terrible poverty, invading hordes of unbelievers, causing untold havoc and 
suffering. They were deeply concerned and, being true lovers of the Church, sought 
audience with the Pope, Innocent III. The Pope re-directed their offers and concern. Would 
they, with a band of Cistercian abbots, engage in a preaching project in Southern France to 
draw back to the fold the great portions of the people who were being deceived and misled. 
Sadly the secular clergy were often not educated themselves and were, moreover, involved 
in the care of lands and benefices. Diego and Dominic set off. 

Though they tried, no progress was made. Diego realized that they were too 
abundantly supplied with provisions. All the baggage must be abandoned. The misguided 
teachers and their followers had denounced a wealthy church and advocated simplicity in 
following Christ who lived and died poor. In this they were right. Dominic followed his 
bishop's wise lead. They became really poor and thus witnessed to the Christ who emptied 
himself. Soon they gathered a small group of women and the Monastery of Saint Mary of 
Prouilhe was born. The year was 1206. There were debates with the leaders of the sects. 
People were interested, changing their minds. But the going was painfully hard and slow. 
Then there was a bolt from the blue. Diego died. 

The missionaries all returned home. Dominic alone would not turn back. He 
remained and continued to preach and reach out to any and all who would listen. Many 
harassed and even hunted him. There are in Dominic's country to this day, marked trails and 
small wayside shrines where he passed often on his journeys. He would sing. He would tell 
his would-be assassins to do a slow job of it, if they wanted to kill him. His bishop and his 
best friend, Diego was no longer with him. He must have considered the possibility of 
returning to his beloved homeland, Spain and to the Cathedral church of Osma. How long 
had it been since he had seen his family, his friends? How long since he had known the 
quiet comfort, peace and security of a religious house where his brethren were seeking God. 
And no doubt, he would be welcomed and honored as a hero. Why stay here? The times 
were violent amid political and religious upheavals. Angry bands on horseback were ruining 
the crops of the toil-worn people. The people lived under a cloud of doubt, frustration and 
struggle. The rich were getting richer, the poor, poorer. Dominic stood at the crossroads, but 
did not waver. The people needed him. They needed the Gospel message of hope. There 
were contrary winds to face. He would not turn back. 

And so, Dominic with all his energy and passionate zeal, set himself to win all 
the souls he could for Christ. His heart was full of an extraordinary, almost 
incredible, yearning for the salvation of everyone (Libellus, #34). 

This is a truly most marvelous passage -- describing the deepest Dominic. Love for Christ, 
boundless yearning; this was Dominic! Every day and every night. Until he died, consumed, 
offered without reserve, like the apostle and priest, Jesus Christ. For his Body the Church. 

For more than ten years Dominic moved from place to place in Southern France, 
reaching out to all. The Pope's legate was assassinated and a disastrous war soon raged 
across the land. Dominic stayed on until his friend, Simon de Montfort's death. It must have 
been incredibly difficult, but he knew he must act and act quickly. He did not want war or 
polemic. Both sides were God's children and he was a preacher of Christ's message of 
peace. 



16 



After many years of labor, more or less alone, he had about fifteen men who had 
joined him. Just fifteen followers. Have I toiled in vain? But he did not look at this as failure. 
He was a man of prayer and hope. Dominic would continue to provide for his sisters in the 
Monastery at Prouilhe. It had been from the start and happy and blessed interchange and 
commerce of life and mutual giving. Dominic had been their father and brother for ten years 
as they formed with him the Sancta Praedicatio. The nuns would grow and hold fast (through 
eight centuries). 

Then Dominic dispersed his brethren to Paris, Bologna and Madrid. It was August 
15, 1217. Far from turning back, there were, for him four, final unbelievable years. After 
more than 7,500 miles 6 of walking (yes. walking!) across Europe, across the Alps and the 
Pyrenees, Dominic crossed the boundaries of indifference and skepticism to the realization 
of an order of preachers who would be free to go wherever they were needed. He carefully 
and astutely sought and received the permissions that were needed. Dominic, as man of 
prayer, priest and loyal son of the Church, could see that there were now laborers for the 
harvest. His work was coming to its end. 

In the hot summer of 1221 Dominic was preaching in Italy. His great desire was to 
preach the glad tidings of hope to those who did not yet know the sweet and saving Name of 
Jesus. Vicaire makes the most surprising statement that Dominic's personal vocation was 
was first a missionary and only secondly a founder. 7 William of Montferrat who knew 
Dominic for sixteen years testified that they had agreed and promised that after the Order 
was founded they would go north to the pagans. 8 We can see them bending over the map 
and making their plans. Later William would go the far north, and Dominic would be with him 
and with all his sons and daughters in spirit, inspiring them with wisdom and courage from 
his own life of prayer and utter gift of himself. His great dream would be fulfilled in them: to 
reach out to the far ends of the earth. 

Now the brethren entreated him to rest. No, not yet. He had no bed of his own. His 
nights were spent in the church. His cries came from his eager, longing spirit. Through the 
years he had uttered these cries to his Father. They were cries for sinners. He ever grieved 
for the people, his people, Christ's sheep. Jerusalem, Jerusalem. How often would I have 
gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would 
not! (Matt 23:27). Yet, sometimes they may have been cries that he himself, would not turn 
back. So many were indifferent. He had tried. He was human. Perhaps Dominic, like Paul, 
had heard these words of re-assurance: Fear not.. J am with you (Acts 18:9); and, My 
companion in suffering, you will share in my overflowing happiness (2 Cor 1 :7). He would not 
turn away from the Mystery. He would not turn back. 

Dominic knew he was dying. He wanted to be buried under the feet of his brethren. 
He promised them and us that he would be of more use to us in heaven, than on earth. He 
lifted up his hands like the priest offering the oblation at Mass. Dominic offered everything he 
was and had and could have had. The angels came to meet him. He had not turned back - 
ever. 

Blessed Father, Dominic, we thank you for the prayer, the passion, the struggle, and 
the victory of your life. And for calling us to share in the family you founded. Lead us to the 
Fountain of Life that we may be filled and overflow - to the ends of the earth - like you, 
great lover and missionary of Jesus Christ. 

For the joy which lay before him - for himself and those for whom he toiled - 
Dominic, you never turned back. 



17 



SAINT DOMINIC'S TRAVELS *5g^ 
1215 - 1221* 




, MAWUD - 



Saint Dominic walked approximately 7662 miles over~*v>— ^O 
mountainous terrain, roughly the equivalent of 2.75 times 
across the USA - from New York to San Francisco. 



1 Jordan of Saxony: On the Beginnings of the Order of Preachers, ed. and trans. Simon Tugwell, O.P., 
Dominican Sources: New Editions in English (Parable, USA, 1982), ch. 1, #6 & 7. If we are inclined to 
doubt the reality of a great passion for truth and beauty in a young heart we need only recall the intense 
lives of a Mozart, Beethoven, or Schubert who gave themselves from their earliest years to their art; or 
better, to our own St Agnes, Catherine of Siena or Rose who lived and loved so ardently from their earliest 
years; or the deep St. Thomas of Aquinas or the vibrant Vincent Ferrer. 

Bl. Cecilia, "A Portrait of Blessed Dominic," ed., Francis C. Lehner, O.P., Saint Dominic: Biographical 
Documents (Washington, DC: Thomist Press, 1964), 183-184. Fr Lehner remarks (on page 161) in the 
introduction of the chapter quoted that "Cecilia must be taken seriously.... We are more certain now, than 
ever before, that her description of Dominic is accurate." 

3 Simon Tugwell, O.P., "Christ as Model of Sanctity in Humbert of Romans," in Christ Among the Medieval 
Dominicans, editors Kent Emery, Jr., & Joseph P. Wawrykow (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame 
Press, 1998), 92. 

4 To be "another himself as the Eternal Father would later reveal to St Catherine: "...there is no way she 
can so savor and be enlightened by this truth as in continual and humble prayer, grounded in the 
knowledge of herself and God. For by such prayer the soul is united with God, following in the footsteps of 
Christ crucified, and through desire and affection of love he makes of her another himself." Catherine of 
Siena The Dialogue, Classics of Western Spirituality, trans. & ed. by Suzanne Noffke, O.P. (New York: 
Paulist Press, 1980), 25. 

5 Biblical quotations are from the RSV, 1962. 

6 See the above map of Dominic's journeys of these last years of his life. 

7 Cf. H.-M. Vicaire, O.P., Genius of Saint Dominic, A Collection of Study-Essays (Nagpur, India: Dominican 
Publications, 1990), 129-130. 



18 




S^jgrW' 75' 



fe° Who was this dynamic man 
Whose inner strength broke open Gospel truth? 
Who was he, whose humbleness lifted high the Word 
As a torch for all the world to see ... who was he 
Who chose to be beneath his brothers' feet? 




/S^SStoSS'o A mountain filled with volcanic fire 

A giant, bursting with Christ, filled with vibrant desire. 
A peaceful tower of compassion, who stood firm and calm 
A rock of truth - against falsehood and deceit. 
A sword of Wisdom in his mouth. 

@©TOfclfeo Sending forth a million points of light 
Into a world darkened by sin, hate and power. 
Bright rays of white against the black walls of error, 
Reaching for souls to the very gate of hell, 
His cry still echoes, 
"What will become of sinners"? 



The purity of his life still challenges us today! His joyful 
Spirit still rings through every city, every village, every land. 
His voice still preaches justice and truth 
In all who follow his untiring steps. 
His mountain still stands upon the world spreading points of light. 

The Gospel in his hand, 
his heart a flame, 
this is DOMINIC. 



FOLLOW HIM! 



Sr. Mary Angela, OP 
Langley, B.C., Canada 







19 



CATHERINE OF SIENA: 

HER FELLOWSHIP OF FRIENDS 



Sister Mary Regina, O.P. 
Langley, B.C., Canada 



Introduction 



So often we have heard the saying: "Tell me who are your friends, and I will tell 
you who you are." This study of St. Catherine and some of the friends who made up her 
closely-knit circle of followers will attempt to show Catherine and these many persons -- 
as they grew, blossomed and took a part in each other's lives and indeed, in the life of 
the Church at that crucial time of its history. 

The fact that Catherine of Siena enjoyed the friendship of very many people is 
incontestable. We cannot live and grow in isolation. Isolation leads to sickness and 
depression. Catherine, by contrast, grew through her friends to such an extent, that her 
very personality expanded through these encounters. Each one of her friends was like 
another horizon, another large arched rainbow, or like the stretch of the sky at sea. Her 
life was an enrichment of their life, and theirs of hers. As we shall see, the love she had 
for her friends was a means for Catherine to express her humanity. We transform others 
by allowing ourselves to be transformed. However, the great commandment to love one 
another just as I have loved you , 1 had to develop, especially in her early years. 

To better understand this paramount aspect of love of God and love of neighbor, 
it will be good to go to that small room Catherine stayed in for three years prior to 
beginning her public ministry. As Dag Hammarskjold wrote in his diary, "The longest 
journey we make is the journey inward." 2 Catherine has just procured permission from 
her mother, Monna Lapa, and her father, Jacopo, not to marry, but under strained 
circumstances. The parents and the large family household are furious that their 
daughter steadfastly refused to concede to their wishes. Catherine matches the emotion 
and is adamant, so much so that to avoid all question of matrimony, she pours vinegar 
on the wound of refusal by cutting off her lovely locks. In reprisal her parents allot her 
this small room that measures 9' x 12' with red brick pavement and a high window, 
reached only by three stairs. 3 



This high window in Catherine's very small cell played an important part in the 
formation of her spirituality. She could not possibly have realized it would provide 
spiritual nourishment for half her soul; that part of her which was so interested in people. 
What she learned from the happenings outside that window formed her into a strong 
pillar of love. 

On the one hand, she was solitary, praying to God, forging her strong union with 
Jesus Christ Crucified and Son of the Father, and seeking always the abiding presence 
of the gentle Jesus and His mother the gentle Mary. On the other hand, there was the 
ever-present window that provided the noise of the street, the footsteps that evidenced 
every emotion, the yells, the shouts, the cries, the lovers' whispers, the children in life 



20 



and laughter, the quarreling, the singers, the buyer and the sellers. There would be the 
sound of horse hoofs, the bray of donkeys, the roll of ox-carts and teams of mules. Little 
by little over the span of these three short years, Catherine was given the insight and the 
grace to combine the two. Ironically, the very people she initially sought to avoid so as to 
concentrate on prayer and union with God, she actually encountered in a more intense 
way in this small room the size of a large closet. They entered into her hearing, into her 
heart, into her prayer and into her spirituality. She could hear their sorrows and their joys 
as they passed by. She took them to heart to such a degree, that when she left this 
hermitage to begin serving others, the passage was easy, for she went from love of God 
to love of neighbor, from service in prayer to service in action. 

The years Catherine spent in her small room, living in secluded hermit fashion in 
the Benincasa home, provided and developed in her an incalculable union with God. But 
she had friends, many friends who were drawn to her and who loved her. While these, 
her dear friends could not define the indefinable, they felt and knew the grace of God in 
Catherine, a grace beyond a human telling, a very presence of "Him who is." The human 
works of charity, which also included the wonderful relationships of exchange and 
friendship, plus the outstanding spiritual life surging in Catherine became as two strong 
streams flowing into one river. 

The Caterinati was a close-knit fellowship of like-minded people in Siena, and 
later beyond the confines of that city, who recognized Catherine Benincasa as a spiritual 
guide and leader. At first the group was small, since it was spontaneously formed when 
Catherine began her public ministry, visiting the Misericordia Hospital and other such 
institutions and persons in need of physical and spiritual assistance. 

It would be tempting to think of Catherine as one whose heart and mind resided 
on a spiritual cloud, exclusive of the need of the neighbor. Not so, for much of the awe of 
the Sienese over Catherine developed as they observed not only her intense piety, but 
also as they witnessed her tireless ministrations on the practical level, be it washing the 
clothes of the sick, dressing their sores, feeding them, etcetera. The ungrateful woman, 
Tecca, so full of spite for Catherine's benefactions as she dressed her repulsive and 
infectious skin lesions, is only one of countless examples. There was also that other 
charity, her work in her home at Fontebranda and in other person's households. All her 
biographers tell of her nights, not spent in sleep, but spent rather in the unfinished 
business of the home, the cellar and the countless needs in the realm of the practical. 
Throughout these practical and "unpractical" services, her humanity developed and we 
can guess that how her capacity for true friendship grew. 

Gradually, her friends, the Caterinati, followed her in all these works, ever alert to 
the needs of others. No one was an enemy or stranger to Catherine or those who joined 
her group. Friendships flowered among them. To say they loved Catherine is an 
understatement. To say they loved one another cannot be overlooked. The more she 
encountered her neighbor, and everyone was a neighbor to be loved, the more they in 
turn recognized a most powerful dynamic of spirituality in her and in themselves. 

It cannot be emphasized too much that all kinds of men and women of every walk 
and stamp joined the fellowship, the Caterinati. Her friends and her ministry were as 
diverse as the sounds and people that had swished past her small cell window when she 
was a hermit. The impressive reality of love drew each person; both by the love they 
observed being poured out by Catherine for others, and the love she imbibed and 



21 



shared with them individually. Gradually this love in Catherine burst beyond proportion, 
for they recognized that she was a mystic far beyond the ordinary. They became more 
and more aware and amazed at the degree of union with God Catherine enjoyed. Some 
of these friends played a more prominent place in the Caterinati than others. 



Catherine's Friends 

Lisa Colombini, married to Catherine's half brother Bartolomeo, actually lived 
with their children in the Benincasa home. Lisa had been born of the prestigious 
Colombini family, a fact that could easily have caused her to look down on Catherine. 
Here is Lisa, a woman accustomed to being waited on and served with diligence and 
exactitude. One almost expects her to be demanding and sharp with Catherine. After all, 
the children and the chores present a handful, and when Catherine leaves the hermitage 
room after the three years, all this work will fall on her shoulders. Contrary to any spirit of 
haughty prestige and impatience, none was so kind and understanding as Lisa. The 
good Lisa, the large hearted Lisa, is able to forego her privileges for genuine friendship. 
Lisa is a peacemaker. Initially the family mood is stiff when Catherine resumes her 
presence with them. Lisa stands by Catherine to assist her through the transition. She 
understood that Catherine was more than a household servant. She intuitively 
recognized the holiness and wisdom of Catherine. This was the beginning of the 
Caterinati: Catherine and Lisa Colombini. However, many, many others would join the 
group, some among these her intimate friends, others close friends, and others who 
were acquaintances whom she loved and who loved her in return. 

Francesca Gori, a high-ranking member of the Dominican Third Order, 
befriended Catherine at about the same time as Lisa. The two forged a deep friendship 
with Catherine generally addressing Francesca affectionately as simply "Cecca." The 
two could confide the inner depths of the heart. Both Cecca and Lisa were older than 
Catherine and mothers of families. They possessed the maturity of age, applying 
encouragement and support at every juncture; they were her defense when needed, a 
bulwark of protection. They followed her everywhere, putting into capsule all her words 
to store them in their hearts. Cecca and Lisa's influence lightened Catherine's spirit 
adding more and more weight to her inner humanity. Alice Curtayne relates, "Catherine 
was a changed being when animated by (their) conversation, her face becoming sweet 
and gay, her regard frank and penetrating." 4 

Alessa Saracini, a widow, came from one of the five great Sienese families. She 
too did not allow her more cultured way of life to hamper a genuine and faithful 
friendship with Catherine. Alessa seems to have added a maternal touch to her 
friendship. At the time of their meeting, Catherine had reached her early twenties, still 
young for all her natural and supernatural intelligence. Unlike Lisa and Cecca, Alessa 
was a woman of culture and educated, possessing an ability to read and write Latin. 
Alessa, so taken with Catherine, sold her home to pick up lodging near the Benincasa 
residence. Catherine would accept Alessa's hospitality for days or weeks, according to 
her need of silence and prayer. The two women shared compatibility in their love for 
words, their love for silence, and the balance of both. The providence of God worked 
through Alessa on behalf of Catherine, since she knew all the history of the politics of 
State, Empire and Church from the inside. Few were as equipped from experience to 
share these in detail with Catherine, thus providing her with an early education for 



22 



understanding religious, cultural and political events of past, present and future. And 
Catherine would die in Alessa's gentle, loving arms, surrounded by her closest friends. 

Bonaventura, Catherine's sister, died just prior to Catherine shutting herself up 
in the small room to be a recluse for three years. However, Bonaventura and the young 
Catherine had forged a unique friendship and bond, sharing the inner longings of the 
heart. Lisa, Francesca and Alessa compensated a great deal for this loss, assisting 
Catherine into the ways of maturity where Bonaventura left off. How true are the words 
of Sirach: Whoever fears the Lord makes true friends, for as a person is, so is his friend 
too (6:17 NJB). 

The Dominican friars were among Catherine's dearest friends. She loved the 
friars, the nuns, the laity and the special woman's group of the Dominican laity at the 
time, of which she became a member. Can a building become a "friend?" She felt a 
special affinity with an enormous red brick Gothic structure on the hill of Camporeggi, the 
Church of San Domenico, five minutes walk from her home. During her three years in 
her small "hermit" room, Catherine could see a bit of San Dominico. This Church 
became her friend in a unique way: the sight of it filled her with more and more longing 
for God. The edifice drew her spirit into interior expressions of love. The sound of the bell 
reverberated joy in her spirit. Alice Curtayne says, "The friars in black and white who 
lived (at the convent) were men of peace among a congregation always armed, always 
thinking of war and discussing war: war with a neighboring republic." 5 

Tommaso dalla Fonte's brother married into the Benincasa family. When his 
parents died, he lived in the Benincasa home, becoming like a brother to Catherine. 
They shared a mutual love for the Dominicans, resulting in Tomaso joining the Order. He 
becomes Catherine's first spiritual director. A good choice for his mildness and genuine 
friendship, but not the stature of a theologian Catherine needed. Still, life evolves, and 
the natural and supernatural friendship these two enjoyed worked one more thread in 
the tapestry of Catherine's life. 

Matteo Cenni enjoyed a life-long friendship with Catherine. It began when 
Catherine started to frequent the Misericordia Hospital, whose rector was Matteo. 
Catherine and Matteo possessed the same deep compassion for the sick, suffering, and 
destitute of the hospital. Matteo had begun his ministry there as an act of reparation for 
his earlier life of dissolute behavior. Their mutual friend, William Flete, the Lecceto 
hermit, had led him to conversion. It was quite natural for Matteo to join the ever-growing 
fellowship, the Caterinati. 

A very moving drama that illustrates their deep friendship occurred during the 
devastating, horrific plague of 1374-5, when Matteo was mortally stricken. He had joined 
Catherine's fellowship in caring for the dying at this time, a task of mercy rendered only 
by the most heroic, since half the population of Siena perished, leaving disease and 
stench everywhere. Of a sudden, the beloved Matteo was down, down so pitiably, and 
like the other diseased, hopeless and beyond remedy. When Catherine got the news, 
she flew up the stairs to him, crying out, "Get up, get up, Matteo, this is not the time for 
you to lie in bed!" 6 God had worked a miracle through Catherine's prayer that day for her 
treasured friend. He was completely restored to health. No one stricken by the plague 
escaped death, none but Matteo and another of Catherine's friends, Father Delle Vigne, 
for whom also she begged God for a miracle. 



23 



William Flete the Augustinian hermit of the Lecceto, a man renowned among the 
people of the area, became a humble follower of Catherine. He unhesitatingly and 
frequently sought her advice. By day he preached on mission, returning to his monastery 
for prayer, living mostly on a diet of water mixed with vinegar. Although William Flete 
was not a member of the Caterinati, his meetings with Catherine evidenced a mature 
friendship, for in addition to sharing on the level of spirituality; they were compatible 
enough to disagree to a measure, an element not foreign to real friends. Flete wisely 
directed many a hardened sinner to Catherine, imploring them just to visit her, knowing 
that the grace of repentance worked through her to capture them for God. With these 
encounters, they invariably joined her fellowship of friends. 

Bartolomeo Dominici, a Dominican friar and friend of Tommaso dalla Fonte, 
also became a friend of Catherine. As the Caterinati or fellowship increased, everyone 
grew more and more in awe of Catherine. Her words were rich with spontaneous 
teachings flowing without effort from her heart to her tongue. These had to be captured. 
Bartolomeo gathered up as many fragments of her speech as he could. Their friendship, 
however, met an initial snag, with Bartolomeo wondering and scrutinizing her validity as 
a true mystic. He had every reason to be skeptical, half of Siena by this time wondered 
about her. Indeed she had her enemies as well as her supporters. Gradually he was 
convinced. Alice Curtayne writes, "This friendship with Bartolomeo Dominici had a 
profound and lasting influence on Catherine's intellectual development." 7 The learned 
Bartolomeo had procured his doctorate at Balogna, was a lecturer at the University of 
Siena and a studious, penetrating Dominican, acquiring a reputation for learning in the 
Order. He was a delegate of peace, as were many of the Caterinati. Catherine in her 
turn, encouraged him with letters full of sublime doctrine. 

Neri (Ranieri) di Landoccio dei Paglianesi appeared on the scene at the 
perfect time. As Catherine became well known, it became imperative for her to send 
letters. Many of the Benincasa family had moved to Florence because of the political 
change in Siena and for financial reasons. At first Alessa wrote Catherine's letters. Then 
she met Neri, a poet by nature, a man with a way with words, and because of this, a 
complement to Catherine's sensitive and artistic nature. However, this young aristocrat 
suffered a terrible inner melancholy and a hyper-sensitivity. Bartolomeo, who 
endeavored to keep pen and paper in hand, felt that Neri would be the better scribe for 
letters and the dictation coming from of Catherine so frequently. She had a lasting and 
moving influence on Neri who repaid her patient goodness to him by offering to be her 
major secretary. It was a win/win situation, for Catherine's genius of expression calmed 
the hyper Neri to allow his own gifts to rise out of the tomb. 

Francesco Malavolti possessed a temperament just the opposite of the poetic 
Neri. Sad to say, Malavolti lived the spirit of carnival the year round. This man of nobility, 
married to a young Sienese and rather young himself, suffered from a weakness for 
women. Neri sought to capture him for Catherine. Malavolti, filled with ridicule, finally 
consented to meet her. The encounter was electrifying. The arrogant Malavolti wept, 
confessed, and to the surprise of all joined Catherine's growing group of friends at 
Fontebranda, the district of tanners and dyers in the city. 

Malavolti made a unique contribution to the arena of the Caterinati: a robust 
sense of humor! For all of Catherine's serious side, we see her open to humor, evident in 
the world of contrast, surprise, and incongruity. Francesco Malavolti brought laughter to 
the group and to Catherine. 



24 



Master Gabriele Volterra, a Franciscan Provincial, and Father Giovanni 

Tantucci, an Augustinian, both felt distrust at the very thought of Catherine. Both were 
learned, both well known, both ready to trap Catherine as they spoke to her on their first 
visit. Catherine's words became a mirror of their material indulgence, and in these words 
they saw themselves as they really were before God. They not only received the grace 
of immediate repentance, but they also came to a deep remorse as Catherine spoke. 
They abandoned their possessions and splendor and radically changed their lives. 

Raimondo delle Vigne (of Capua) met Catherine when she needed him most. 
As strange events go, she was summoned to the Dominican General Chapter held in 
May, 1374 in Florence. By now Catherine was not only the talk of Siena, but of the entire 
run of Italian City States. Her mysticism, theology, miracles, fasting and spontaneous 
sermons, plus the enormous following of Caterinati, attracted the attention of the 
Dominican friars in General Chapter. Catherine was duly and carefully interviewed on all 
aspects of her activities of Church, ministry, the Order, her fellowship and on doctrine. 
They laid down only one recommendation: Catherine must have a spiritual director of 
exceptional quality. They appointed Raimondo delle Vigne, a friar of learning, a preacher 
and teacher, and a man who would eventually become Master of the Order. 

Raimondo, now Catherine's confessor and director and her very dear friend, 
would in time, write her biography. The Chapter and Master of the Order sent Raymond 
to Siena, not only to minister in that city, but also to be near Catherine. He was an 
aristocrat by birth, and sixteen years older than Catherine. His field of excellence, 
Scripture and Patrology, equipped him well for the receptive and active mind of 
Catherine Benincasa. The two were not a set of Dominican "twins." Catherine was 
ardent, quick, spontaneous, creative, passionate, intuitive, and yes, impulsive. By 
contrast, Raimondo was deliberate, cautious, discerning, and patient. With regard to 
patience, Catherine would at times talk about God non-stop. Raimondo found himself 
once in a while falling asleep as she expounded with great fervor and at great length. All 
the same, Alice Curtayne makes this statement of tribute: "The moment he met 
Catherine, he touched the point of greatness, because he rose immediately to some 
perception of her possibilities. He was so magnificent in this that the tribute cannot be 
over-emphasized." 8 

Catherine stayed in Florence for only a few weeks. During this time she 
continued to exercise her remarkable facility for making friends. Among the impressive 
number were: Niccolo Soderini, one of the Florentine governors; Don Juan of Cells, a 
famous penitent; Francesco Pippino, a tailor, Pietro Canigiani, Florentine ambassador; 
and innumerable others, including nuns and priests. 9 Florence contributed immensely 
toward Catherine's understanding of Church and State as it existed at this historical 
juncture. 

Raimondo and Catherine shared a mutual conviction and desire to stir up 
Christendom for another Crusade. The Italian cities, all at war with one another and 
experiencing much internal strife, became another common concern. Gregory XI, 
residing in Avignon and not in Rome, as well as the corruption of so many of the clergy, 
posed a mutual sorrow. Throughout the rest of Catherine's life, and as we shall see, 
progressively, they and the fellowship prayed and worked to address these problems. 



25 



At the time of the plague, Raimondo was stricken the dread disease. Catherine 
knelt at his bedside and prayed so long that after an hour and a half, poor Raimondo 
despaired of her attention for his cure and his life. Then she suddenly came out of her 
prayer and without a word, rose to prepare food for him. This seemed more than curious 
to Raimondo, who only gradually realized the cure was in process and that he could 
indeed eat and drink and walk. Raimondo, like most of these closest friends, remained 
with her the rest of her life, and was her delegate on various missions, even 
accompanying her to the Italian cities, to Avignon and eventually to Rome. 

Niccolo di Toldo, a young Perugian aristocrat in Siena, found himself suddenly 
arrested and condemned to death for a mere slip of the tongue against the Sienese 
government. Curtayne calls the sentence savage, which indeed it was. Had Siena and 
Perugia not been at odds, Niccolo would be free. True despair and rage entered into the 
young man. Impervious to all efforts to calm him, Catherine was called to Niccolo. 
Through the grace of God and prayer, she brought him to the sacraments, prepared him 
gently for his inevitable death, and miraculously received in turn a gentle response at 
every encounter. 

There developed a deep friendship between the two. The young fellow allowed 
Catherine to mold him like moist clay into the image of Christ Crucified, Christ who 
willingly laid down his life. When the time came for execution, Catherine knelt at the spot 
where the victim stood. Later she wrote about this wrenching experience to Raimondo: 
"He knelt down with great meekness; and I stretched out his neck and bent down over 
him, reminding him of the Blood of the Lamb, He said naught save 'Jesus' and 
'Catherine.' And, so saying, I received his head into my hands, closing my eyes in the 
Divine Goodness and saying, 'I will.'" 10 The union of pure love of God and the perfection 
of grace and friendship inextricably united Catherine and Niccolo. The blood from his 
head, held by Catherine, saturated her clothes, a fact that simply sent her into even 
greater realms of prayer, an experience so unique, so filled with love and desire that she 
carried it with her the rest of her life. 

Stefano Maconi could be dubbed an understudy of Neri di Landoccio. However, 
it was not clone-likeness, although Stefano did replace Neri as Catherine's scribe. 
Catherine and the fellowship, along with Raimondo, worried over the political situation 
rife with war and its attendant turmoil throughout Italy. At this time Catherine began 
writing to Pope Gregory XI in Avignon about her concerns, offering advice, filling the 
lines with the spirituality that activated her own heart. She could not know if Gregory 
received her letter, so she sent her dear Neri to Gregory, putting Stefano in his place as 
her letter writer. 

Alice Curtayne describes Stefano Maconi: "...he was an unusually complete 
fellow. Handsome, dashing, always splendidly accourtred and mounted, cultured, sweet- 
tempered and pure in his life." 11 He also enjoyed confrontation with his family's enemies, 
two other Sienese Families. Finally Stefano's mother called for peace. However, the vice 
of confrontation just would not come to a halt for Stefano, whose heart beat for it as 
quick the feet of his horse could run. His mother and others finally swayed him to meet 
Catherine. There he stood in distain of her and in much embarrassment, and there his 
heart came to a halt. What did Catherine do to cause him to be immediately receptive 
and change? Curtayne says it so well: "Catherine greeted him with that casual intimacy 
reserved for old friends." As he related the family quarrels to her, he received the grace 
to understand the foolishness of it all. Before long Stefano took on the wider vision of 



26 



Catherine for the Church, for Siena and for the Italian cities; she gave him a new 
horizon. He later became the Head of the Carthusian Order and worked with great 
success to re-establish unity in the Church and his Order torn apart by the great Schism. 

Gregory XI cannot be understood in the light of friendship with Catherine until we review 
a bit of the history of the time. In 1375 Catherine and the fellowship of friends 
relinquished their passion for the crusade for two reasons: The moral disorder in Italy 
had reached its zenith; the enemy, the arrogant French Legates seemed bent on 
crushing the Italian cities in the worst possible manner. At first Siena, Pisa and Lucca 
maintained neutrality. Eventually, however, they too joined the cities known as "The 
Tuscan League." Catherine and the fellowship were thrown into the world of politics, 
exercising their inner religious convictions for the moral good at every turn, voicing 
concerns to prelate and populous, while at the same time working for peace through 
strenuous prayer. The one encouraging buzz about, and this encouraging possibility 
offered a ray of hope: Gregory XI, now in Avignon, might return to Rome! 

Unfortunately, Gregory in Avignon, appointed nine new Cardinals. Of the nine, 
seven were French. Keeping in mind that the clash between the Italians and the French 
was at its pitch at this point, there was yet another impasse: One of these French 
Cardinals, the hated and detestable Abbot of Marmoutier, a man of terrible intrigue and 
murderous menace, stood as top enemy of "The Tuscan League." To the Italians, this 
simply seemed a replay of past cruelty. 

As the tug of war began with new vigor, Catherine initiates correspondence with 
Pope Gregory. This must not be seen as whim on her part. She had already traveled to 
Florence and Pisa as emissary of peace, and she and her friends collaborated in 
peaceful efforts on other fronts. Through all this, an ever-developing new phase begins 
in the life of Catherine and her traveling entourage, her fellowship. Neri visited the Pope 
first. Meanwhile Catherine, inextricably engaged in the drama that unfolds, feels keenly 
the pain of Florence, the city of too much mischief, now experiencing Gregory's heavy 
blow, the hard hitting decision of interdict. With this preliminary history in mind, we can 
backtrack to view Gregory more finely. Known as Peter Roger de Beaufort, he was made 
Cardinal at age eighteen, then Pope at age forty. Gregory was ordained priest the day 
before he was crowned Pope. History knows him as scholarly and learned, frail in health, 
a good man, but not firm. 

Catherine wrote to Gregory six times prior to her visit to Avignon. Her letters, 
characteristically dictatorial in tone, she sweetened with her expressions of deference. In 
turn, Gregory showed patience and courtesy toward Catherine in his return post. 
Catherine spoke only a Tuscan variety of Italian, while Gregory knew not a word of it. 
Catherine's dear friend and treasured director, Raimondo, acted as translator, 
transferring Catherine's comments into Latin. Of her new friend, Pope Gregory, she 
requested peace for Florence, that Gregory return to Rome, and that he still keep the 
small flame of going forward with plans for the crusade burning, should this hope ever 
come to full flame. It is a fact that Gregory trusted and liked Catherine, so much so, that 
their personal destinies crisscross in their lives given for the Church. 

We see Gregory carved in a certain greatness, especially in his humility and 
purity of heart, no small tribute for a French Pope, living in an atmosphere of opulence in 
the Papal apartments in Avignon. Gregory sincerely worked for peace, managing to 
forestall the great schism, wanting to engage the crusade and to bring the Papacy back 



27 



to Rome. We can say that in many ways Gregory and Catherine heard the beat of the 
same drum. This caused Catherine to write to Gregory with freedom, even giving him the 
nickname, "Babbo." For example, in a letter exhorting his return to Rome, she writes, 
"Let's go quickly, my dear Babbo, and fearlessly." 12 

Soon the day came when Catherine and a good number of her close friends 
actually set out for Avignon to plead for a lifting of the interdict on Florence. This effort 
largely failed. However, the overwhelming win was Gregory's decision and resolve to 
return the Papacy to Rome, he the Frenchman who had never set foot in the Eternal 
City! Historians will have their own opinion of Gregory. Truth to tell, though he vacillated 
in anguish and under pressure of a corrupt Papal court, he displayed no small amount of 
courage in leaving Avignon. His friend Catherine helped him over that impossible bridge 
with her constant call to bravery. 

The Romans gave the Pope a good reception and welcome. However, the 
clamor for Florence to be free of the interdict got the wheels of discontent started 
throughout the Italian city states. Then Gregory made the terrible mistake of sending the 
wretched French legates to Florence and to the cities. These legates belittled and 
embattled them. Poor Gregory was caught in between the jaws of ills he could not 
change and ills he sought to change. When Catherine, now back in Siena, got wind of it, 
her letters poured forth in ever greater earnestness. These offered the comfort Gregory 
needed before his death which occurred soon after. He was never strong, and the 
outbursts and reactions from his imprudent moves proved too much for him. His last act 
was to lift the interdict over Florence, but it was too late to prevent the tragedy yet to 
come. 

Urban VI succeeded Pope Gregory XI and was bent on reform. His intelligence and 
learning was equal to the best minds. Unfortunately, he approached his measures with 
incredible rudeness toward everyone, including and especially the Cardinals. Alice 
Curtayne captures the tone of it well when she writes: "The Cardinals became 
embittered by the insufferable edge of Urban's temper." 13 This terrible attitude, which 
became increasingly worse, put the Pontiff at odds with literally everyone. The French 
Cardinals, accompanied by three Italian Cardinals, "solved" the problem by returning to 
France, and at Fondi, they elected Clement VII, which immediately set the tragic 
Western Schism in place. Catherine, Raimondo and the close friends with her in Rome, 
understood exactly what had happened. Urban had been elected in the proper manner. 
That he had problems of ill temper that escalated with the passage of time caused great 
concern. However, they had been in Avignon and in Rome for the entire process of the 
election of both Gregory and Urban, they knew all the details and that it was a true 
election. Actually Catherine could see the Schism coming, but the acid on the wound 
was seeing half the populous stand by one Pope and half by the other. The Master of 
the Dominican Order, Father Elias, sided with Clement. Much fighting, killing and bitter 
antagonism occurred on both sides. 

Meanwhile, Catherine, in terrible and wrenching darkness of faith, wrote to 
Urban. She visited him. She who had lost every dream, the peace between the Italian 
cities, the crusade, the solid papacy in Rome, it was she who extended allegiance, 
assistance and friendship to a Pope whose mind was deteriorating. Who will stand up for 
you, Urban, against your enemies: A true friend, a Catherine Benincasa. It's easy to love 
and befriend the brave and the best. But who will befriend the downcast? Who will uplift 
the desperate? Who will defend the Teccas, the Niccolos and the Urbans? 



28 



Catherine's Legacy of Friends and Friendship 



History tells us that Catherine, sick, frail and spent, died on 29 th April. However, 
we need not see this as the finishing point, but only as the beginning. She passes the 
torch of friendship and fellowship on to us after the example of Jesus, who passed the 
commandment to love to his disciples, who in turn passed it on to the ages. 

Through her example, Catherine teaches us that friendship is a virtue, and not an 
optional one. Life is a garden that must be cultivated in order to yield a plentiful bounty. If 
we do not cultivate friendships on every level, the garden of life is sterile. In her truly 
inspired work, The Dialogue, Catherine writes, "The virtues give the soul an adornment 
and dignity beyond the simple beauty that is hers from the beginning when I [God] 
created her in my image and likeness." 14 We grow in grace. Friendships assist us in the 
process. Without them we limp along. We see how each friend of Catherine's 
complemented something in her, either her humor and gaiety, or her resolve, or her 
generosity, or her love, or her determination, or her gratitude. The adornment and growth 
simply never stopped. In all this, Catherine grew in her humanity. It is a very beautiful 
thing to see her flourish as a human being, loved and giving love through the friends she 
cultivated all through her life. 

Let Catherine speak once more in one of her letters written to two of her friends 
while she was in Rocca d'Orcia: 

...I want you to understand that we can neither love God nor be virtuous 
without the mediation of our neighbors, because it is in our neighbors that 
we find love and virtue. How so? I'll tell you. I can't show my Creator my 
love for him directly, because I can be of no service to God. So I have to 
use God's creatures as intermediaries, and do for them the service I 
cannot do for God. ...Keep in mind that this virtue is discovered and 
acquired in love for our neighbors, by loving friends and enemies alike for 
the sake of Christ crucified, by putting out the fire of anger and hatred we 
have harbored against our brothers and sisters. 15 



1 John 13:34 

2 Dag Hammarskjold, Markings (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1966), 58). 

3 Alice Curtayne, Saint Catherine of Siena (Rockford, IL: Tan Books and Publishers, Inc. 1980), 16, 
17,18). 

4 Ibid., 35. 

5 Ibid., 7. 

6 Ibid., 76. 

7 Ibid., 37. 

8 Ibid., 72. 

9 Ibid., 74. 

10 Ibid., 85. 

11 Ibid., 98 

12 Catherine of Siena, The Letters of Catherine of Siena, Vol. II, trans. Suzanne Noffke, O.P. (Arizona 
Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 200I), 217. 

13 Ibid., Curtayne, 142. 



29 



FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN ST. CATHERINE OF SIENA 
AND ST. AGNES OF MONTEPULCIANO 



Sister Mary Agnes, O.P. 
Lufkin, TX 



An article about St. Catherine of Siena, fourteenth century Dominican tertiary, and 
her love for St. Agnes of Montepulciano, Dominican nun of the thirteenth century, seems 
timely in this year marking the eighth centenary of the founding of the nuns by St. Dominic in 
Prouilhe, France. St. Agnes of Montepulciano is one of the early nuns in our Order and one 
who is not well known in the Church. All Catholics and most Christians know about St. 
Agnes, the child martyr, but few know much about the Dominican St. Agnes, and even we 
nuns know precious little. 

Although St. Catherine of Siena and St. Agnes of Montepulciano never met on planet 
earth (Agnes lived 1268-1317 and Catherine 1347-1380), they enjoyed a loving, sisterly 
friendship. This is very evident in the visits St. Catherine made to the Monastery of St. 
Agnes in Montepulciano and the letters she wrote to the prioress and a nun there. St. 
Catherine loved to go to the Monastery and experience the peace and quiet of the cloister in 
the midst of her busy apostolic life. 

Like St. Catherine, St. Agnes too had matured at an early age. When nine years old 
she took the habit of the Augustinians but later became a Dominican as a result of her 
dream in which she saw three ships: Augustinian, Franciscan, and Dominican. An angel 
advised her to enter St. Dominic's ship. 1 

St. Catherine's deep devotion to St. Agnes and great love for the contemplative 
cloistered life was probably due to hearing about St. Agnes from Blessed Raymond of 
Capua, O.P., who wrote the life of the saint. The Monastery of St. Agnes at that time was still 
full of memories of her. Catherine's admiration of the contemplative life also probably 
stemmed from the time she lived as a recluse in her own father's house. 

We Dominicans are familiar with the story of St. Catherine going to Montepulciano to 
venerate St. Agnes's body. Here, when she was in prayer, as St. Catherine bent down to 
kiss her foot, Agnes prevented her from stooping by raising her foot, as a sign of affection. 
At a later visit, when Catherine brought her niece as a novice to the Monastery, a shower as 
of manna fell from the ceiling of the chapel upon the body of St. Agnes and Catherine 
praying beside it which covered them both, making their habits all white with its snowy flakes 
which were all tiny crosses. 

One day when St. Catherine was rapt in spirit, she beheld Agnes seated on a lofty 
throne of most beauteous light and an empty throne beside her, which was reserved for a 
soul of equal merit. A humble desire of knowing for whom that vacant seat was prepared 
made Catherine beseech the Lord to signify it to her, and she understood that she herself 
was to reign in Heaven in equal glory with Agnes. On one of the frescoes in the convent one 
can see two golden chairs, standing side by side in heaven, prepared for Agnes and 
Catherine. This vision increased the tender devotion Catherine had long felt for her saintly 
sister in religion. 



30 



In The Dialogue the eternal Father tells Catherine how ardent was the light of faith 
and how firm the hope of Agnes and how he provides for the poor: 

I provide for the poor, and for their poverty they will be given the greatest of 
riches. ...Sometimes I provide by multiplying a little bit of something that 
would never have been enough, as you know I did for that gentle virgin St. 
Agnes. From her childhood right up to the end she never had any hesitation 
concerning herself or her family. So with her lively faith, at the command of 
Mary this poor young thing without any temporal goods began to establish a 
monastery. You know that the place had been a brothel. She didn't think, 
"How will I be able to do this?" But with my Providence she quickly made it a 
holy place, a monastery for religious. There in the beginning she had 
eighteen young virgins, though she had nothing unless I would provide. 2 

I think many of our monasteries can give witness to the same trust in Divine 
Providence during foundation days. 

St. Catherine took a keen interest in the nuns and wanted them to be all they 
promised their Lord to be by their religious profession. She even founded a monastery in 
Belcaro outside Siena. The Belcaro castle was given to her by a man named Sir Vanni who 
turned his life around through Catherine's words and exhortations. His gift fulfilled one of her 
dearest wishes that she might establish a monastery of Dominican nuns at Belcaro. She 
obtained the Pope's permission for its foundation and the monastery was named "Our Lady 
of the Angels." 

Catherine wrote a letter to one of the nuns in Montepulciano saying in part: 

I am writing to you in the Precious Blood of God's Son, longing for you to be a 
true bride consecrated to your bridegroom and adorned with virtue. You 
know, my dearest daughter, that a bride dresses up and adorns herself when 
she presents herself to her bridegroom. [A Sienese bride's wedding dress 
was customarily scarlet. Thus Catherine's imagery of wedding garment and 
charity and Christ's redeeming blood come together. SN] This is what I want 
you to do: I want you to have within you the garment of charity, without which 
you could not go to the wedding... .See to it that you are a faithful bride. And 
do you know when you will be faithful to your bridegroom? When you love no 
one and nothing but him. So I want nothing to be found in your heart but God. 
Empty it of any selfish and sensual love for your relatives or for anything else 
at all.... Keep living in God's holy and tender love. May Christ, sweet Jesus, 
strengthen you. 3 

In another letter to contemplative nuns St. Catherine emphasized enclosure, humility, 
poverty and especially obedience. Regarding enclosure she wrote: 

I long to see you hidden and enclosed in the side of Christ Crucified. 
Otherwise it would be useless to be enclosed within convent walls; in fact it 
would be like being in a prison. So just as you are enclosed physically let your 
affection and desire be securely enclosed and turned away from worldly 
ambition and pleasure to follow your Bridegroom Christ gentle Jesus.... Do 
you know what oath your Bridegroom walked? One of freely chosen poverty 
and obedience. Out of humility, supreme exaltedness descended to the 



31 



lowliness of our humanity. Because of that humility and his ineffable love for 
us he gave up his humanity to the shameful death of the cross.... You are to 
imitate that humility. But it cannot be achieved except through genuine self- 
knowledge and by contemplating the deep humility and meekness of the lamb 
who was slain in such blazing love. 4 

Christ expresses through Catherine the great value of the trials of temptation and 
darkness: "Often I withdraw into myself your feelings, but not grace... You know that the soul 
cannot be perfected except on the two wings of charity and humility. Now humility she learns 
through self-knowledge to which she comes in times of darkness. And charity is gained by 
seeing that in love I have sustained a good and holy will in her... Reflect... that unless you 
were from time to time enticed by temptation, you would become very careless and give up 
the practice of continual desire and prayer." 5 

He is your way, for just as he walked the way of the Cross, so you and 
everyone else must follow him, suffering every sort of pain... for love of him, 
spreading your sail on this tree, Christ Crucified - I mean the sail of love and 
the power of desire with constant prayer. This prayer is a deliverer and a 
fetcher. 

I've been reflecting that those who do all that I've been talking about are 
completely freed from pain and stay peaceful and calm, and this is why I told 
you that I long to see you stripped of selfish sensual love and clothed in this 
royal garment, in the abyss of the eternal King's charity. Then you will be 
freed from the pain of obedience... you will live in peace and calm, 
experiencing God through grace, so that in the end you will receive the 
eternal vision of God. There all pain is finished. There we receive the fruit of 
virtue, the fruit that issues from our labors. 6 

There is much more in the letters of St. Catherine which reveal her deep admiration 
of St. Agnes and the contemplative life. I have given glimpses from the letters which I hope 
will re-awaken your desire to read them in their entirety and to follow these two great women 
more closely in their path of holiness. 

May both saints intercede for us today as we strive to be faithful to our Dominican 
contemplative way of life in this eighth centenary of our foundation in Prouilhe, France. 



1 Johannes Jorgensen, O.P., Life of St. Catherine of Siena (New York: Longmans, Green and Co.: 1938) 

2 St. Catherine of Siena, The Dialogue, trans. Suzanne Noffke, O.P. (Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press 1980), 
312-315. 

3 St. Catherine of Siena, The Letters of St. Catherine of Siena, Vol. 2. trans. Suzanne Noffke, O.P. (Tempe, 
AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2001), Letter T54 / G160, 274-5. 

4 St. Catherine, The Letters of St. Catherine of Siena, Vol. 1, trans Suzanne Noffke, O.P. (Binghamton, NY: 
Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1988), Letter 62, 196-197. 

5 St Catherine, The Letters, Vol. 2, LetterT221 / G152, 182-183. 

6 St. Catherine, The Letters, Vol. 2, Letter T220 / G155, 450. 



32 



THE LITTLE FLOWERS OF THE DOMINICAN SISTERS 



Michal Sieykowski, O.P. 
Translated from the Polish by Matthew Rzeczkowski, OP. 

Washington, D.C. 



Excerpts from the book tfwiqtnica Panska (1743) by Michal Sieykowski, O.P., as 
edited by Jacek Salij, OP, in Legendy Dominkahskie, (Poznaii: W Drodze, 1985), 
193-201. In this book, Father Salij compiles many original texts about Dominican 
Saints and Blesseds, translates from Latin when necessary, and provides a brief 
introduction to each chapter. Because of the similarity in style between these 
vignettes and The Little Flowers of Saint Francis, Father Salij borrows the title "Little 
Flowers". 



Since the texts below speak for themselves, we will limit ourselves to a few words about 
the female branches of the Order of St. Dominic. It was probably from the Albigensians that St. 
Dominic drew the idea of engaging women in the apostolate, first of all relying on their support 
for the work of the priests by special prayer but also [asking them] to educate girls. This was 
especially the case in his giving Albigensian women who had converted back to Catholicism 
(but who formerly had been ardent propagators of the sect) the opportunity to offer their own 
experience and spiritual energy to the service of the Catholic faith. The Dominican Nuns were 
founded in the years 1206-1211, that is in those years when St. Dominic along with his 
companions undoubtedly had no thought of establishing a male religious order but simply 
constituted a group of preachers striving to stop the expansion of the neo-Manichean sects. The 
first branch of nuns (so-called the Second Order) ultimately took shape as a strictly 
contemplative order. In Poland there are three monasteries of contemplative Dominican nuns, 
namely, in Krakow and at St. Ann's near Radom, and the third was recently founded at Radonie 
near Warsaw. 

Much more numerous are the active Dominican Sisters (the so-called Third Order 
Regular, not to be confused with the Third Order for the Laity). There are a number of these 
groups of sisters, independent from one another. Depending on the specific charism of the 
religious group, their aim is the works of mercy, educational work, or missionary work. In Poland 
there are two groups of active Dominican Sisters. The first group, oriented principally to 
educational work and the works of mercy, was founded in 1861 by Mother Columba Bialecka. 
Their motherhouse used to be at Biala Nizna in the province of Nowy Sacz, but is now in 
Krakow. The second group, founded in 1932 by Fr. Jacek Woroniecki, O.P., are missionaries; 
their headquarters are at Zielonka near Warsaw. 

The texts below are taken from Fr. Michal Sieykowski's book Swiatnica Panska [The 
Lord's Temple], published in Krakow in 1743. They are selected from hundreds of little 
biographies preserved in the tradition of this order of saintly sisters. The biographies constitute 
the largest part of Fr. Sieykowski's book (pages 79-304). 



33 



YOU CANT OFFER JUST ANY ROSE TO THE LORD JESUS 

Sister Franciszka Wakchina led a life of devotion. Once out of parental concern over her 
having distractions at prayer, our Lady Mary appeared to her with roses: some beautiful and 
fragrant, others ugly and withered. The beautiful ones represented liturgies with attentiveness 
given to God, the dried out those with distractedness. She begged the Most Holy Mary to 
instruct her how those withered roses might become fresh again. Mary answered her, "Say 
three prayers to the penitent St. [Mary] Magdalene. Through my intercession, she will 
compensate for your coldness." When she had taught [her] this, the roses transformed 
themselves into fresh ones. And Mary said, "I am going right away; we will deliver your prayers 
to my Son." 



THE MIRROR SHOWED THE TRUTH 

Blessed Villana of Florence [Villana de Botti, d. 1 360] was a laywoman, who took a liking 
to rich and fancy clothes. She once placed herself in front of a mirror and saw that her crests 
had been turned into antlers, her curled hair into a snake, her ribbons into vermin, and her 
pearls into toads. Frightened by this vision, she tore everything off. Turning her back on the 
world, Villana adopted the habit of St. Dominic and did penance for her past excesses with great 
mortifications. Later she died in great holiness. 



JESUS HIMSELF TILLED THE GARDEN OF HER SOUL 

Sister Dorothy of Ferrara never spoke except when she spoke to her neighbor about 
God or spoke with God in prayer. Once at Easter time she was conversing with her sisters 
about the Lord Jesus, about how he showed himself as a gardener to St. [Mary] Magdalene. As 
she pined for the Lord, she received the grace [to see] the Lord Jesus stand before her as the 
handsome Gardener of Eden (though the other sisters never saw Him), and this filled her heart 
with great joy. 



WHAT SORT OF BETROTHED WOMAN LOVES LITTLE 

Sister Domitilla, though she received the habit of St. Dominic in her childhood years, did 
not live as a nun should. The Lord Jesus admonished her to [adopt] the religious life in this way: 
He showed her a dead relative who said to her with a stern look, "And you are the betrothed of 
Jesus but you don't love him? Mend your ways, or else you will be condemned forever." 
Frightened by this, she amended her life and lived with great mortifications, fasts, and self- 
denial. 



BETTER TO KISS THE CRUCIFIED THAN TO DEFEND ONESELF AGAINST SLANDER 

Sister Sigismunda was confronted, accused, and punished although she was innocent. 
When she prayed and complained to the Lord Jesus that she was innocent, the Lord Jesus 
responded to her three times from the cross, "Listen but remain silent, listen but remain silent, 
listen but remain silent." Comforted by this, she kept strict silence until her death and would not 
respond to any abuse. Her lips were placed upon the crucified Lord Jesus, and with her hands 
she offered her soul to God. 



34 



THE JOYFUL DEATH OF A RELIGIOUS 

Blessed Clara Gambacorta, a woman of a senatorial family, became a religious of St. 
Francis, but then a Dominican by divine revelation and lived with great saintliness. When she 
was dying, the sisters by her side were crying, but she surrendered her soul to God smiling. Her 
face, which had been blackened by penance, turned lovely; her flesh gave forth the fragrance of 
paradise. In the Office of the Dead, the sisters were unable to say "Eternal rest..." but had to 
finish with the happy verse, "Glory to the Father and to the Son...." One pious person saw her 
soul brighter than the sun amidst angels in a great light, with a costly crown and on her arm a 
cross of precious stones. 



PENANCE DEEPENS LOVE 

Sister Lucy of Soncino, charmingly beautiful from her youth, was entirely worldly. But 
then she heard a sermon on the vanity of the world by the blessed Dominican Matthew [Carrieri] 
of Mantua, who converted many to repentance. She weighed these words of the divine sage: 
Fallax gratia et vana est pulchritudo, mulier timens Deum ipsa laudabitur (Charm is deceptive 
and beauty fleeting; the woman who fears the Lord is to be praised) [Prov 31 :30], 1 and she was 
converted to God. Having renounced all frivolity and having confessed to the above mentioned 
preacher, with the permission of her husband she took the habit of a tertiary of St. Dominic for 
the greater perfection of her soul. From the day of her conversion and taking the habit, she 
never ate meat but contented herself with herbs and light dishes and often fasted on bread and 
water. She lived through three Lents without any meals, often nourishing her soul with just the 
Most Holy Sacrament; she was full of the works of mercy; she prayed very long in church, 
visited the sick, helped the dying and prayed for them; she cheered convicts sentenced to 
death, admonishing them to offer their death and shame for their own sins. She cheered the 
sorrowful and directed erring sinners onto the road to perfection with such spirit and prudence 
that she turned many back to repentance. 

A MEMORABLE VESTITION IN RACIBORZ 

Blessed Euphemia Domitilla, a Polish woman, the daughter of Leszek, duke of Raciborz, 
came from the blood [line] of the Polish kings. From her youth, she dedicated her chastity to the 
Lord God, adorned her youthful years with countless virtues, practiced fervent prayer and 
meditation, and day and night before the crucifix pondered the innocent suffering of her Savior. 
A girl of great innocence, when she reached her twelfth year the duke of Braunschweig asked 
her father for her hand in marriage. But she would not permit it, giving notice that she was 
already espoused to Christ, the handsomest and richest fiance of all. She took the habit of the 
Second [Order] of St. Dominic at the Monastery of the Most Holy Spirit in Raciborz. [Just before] 
this vestition, the Dove was manifested, whiter than snow, descending in three rays upon the 
church of the Holy Spirit. Also, at the Holy Mass, after which (according to custom) she was 
vested, from the Elevation of the Most Holy Sacrament to Holy Communion, angelic music with 
an indescribable melody was heard in the air, not only by her but also by others present, music 
which would express the angels' joy over this girl, who was surrendering herself to the Order in 
service to her Betrothed. 2 



35 



AS IF SHE DID NOT EVEN FEEL THE HOT IRON 

Sister Beatrice Mariz, of the Second Order monastery of St. Catherine in Evora 
[Portugal], was humble, abstemious, and above all abounding in the virtue of charity. Through 
fervent prayer she desired with all her heart to shed her blood as a martyr for the name of 
Jesus. The Lord Jesus heard [her prayer] and granted that as prioress, out of love for her 
neighbor, she would serve a sister who had succumbed to a serious and infectious disease and 
that from her she would become infected herself. When she wanted to be cured of this disease, 
she summoned doctors, who applied to her arm glowing iron and hot bullets as a cure. She bore 
this patiently. In her other hand she held Jesus crucified, fixed her eyes upon him, and mindful 
of his sufferings forgot her own. Throughout this painful and difficult medical treatment, she did 
not open her mouth or complain. 

When asked how could she be so patient and endure such great suffering, she 
answered that meditating on the sufferings of Christ (who in the midst of his cruel passion did 
not open his mouth) her own sufferings seemed like nothing to her. Persevering in this 
steadfastness and concentration on God, in a short time, because the illness was so difficult, 
she departed on the 22 nd of August, the year of Our Lord 1595, for the eternal and flawless 
consolation of delighting in her Bridegroom 



A ROSARY TURNED INTO A BOUQUET OF ROSES 

Sister Cecilia of Feraz [?] was so pure and innocent that she didn't even know what it 
was to commit a mortal sin. With the rosary devotion she venerated our most holy Lady Mary, 
and she merited that after her death there appeared on her beads lovely roses, from which a 
gracious fragrance came. 



MARTHA CAN BE CLOSER TO THE LORD THAN MARY 

Sisters Magdalene and Martha of the monastery at Santarem [Portugal]. One was doing 
the duties of a Martha, spending time with lowly chores in the house and the kitchen and serving 
the sick; the other remained in divine contemplation all the time, day and night, after the 
example of the Magdalene, choosing that [better] part at the feet of Jesus crucified. One time 
Sister Martha came running to choir for a light for a certain sick sister and found Sister 
Magdalene there in tears at the feet of Jesus crucified. They were both happy with their holy 
and pious deeds, the one with her service and the other for remaining with her prayers, when 
they both heard a voice from the mouth of the crucifix, approving both their holy deeds. 
Nevertheless, the crucifix told them of a difference: that although he was pleased with both their 
fasts, still he had a greater liking for the work and service which Martha, out of love for her 
neighbor, showed the sick sister than for Magdalene's unceasing prayer at his feet. And on that 
very day, July 5 th , both of them finished the course of their lives and went to heaven as a reward 
for their merits. 



THE MARTYRDOM OF IRISH DOMINICAN SISTERS 

Sister Honoria of Burke, a city in the province of Lower Connaught on the isle of 
Hibemia, was the daughter of Richard, a nobleman from a family of Danists[?]. In her fourteenth 
year she offered her maidenhood to her Bridegroom Christ, confirming this by a vow made at 



36 



the hands of Fr. Thaddeus Duane, provincial of the Irish Dominicans, from whom she also 
received the habit of the Third Order of St. Dominic. Nevertheless, she built for herself a cottage 
near the monastery and lived there with her servant and her companion, who was also named 
Honoria and came from the MaGaen family. They lived there for a long while during the times of 
the indecent Queen Elizabeth and the reigns of James and Charles, kings of England and lords 
of the isle of Hibernia. 

When she had grown old, during the last persecution incited against the Catholics by the 
godless tyrant Cromwell, religious were dispersed and killed, and [this] convent was 
demolished. She and her companions had to escape from the godless tyranny to a nearby 
island, and there on that [piece of] land she hid for several days. But soon all three were 
discovered, taken prisoner by the heretics, and bound together, suffering great persecution. Sr. 
Honoria MaGaen, young and fair, having [already] received heavy blows from [their] 
boorishness and fearing some kind of coercion and assault on her maidenhood, asked Jesus, 
her Bridegroom, that she might be exempted from that danger. She was heard by him and 
miraculously escaped from those bonds in the nude to a nearby grove and hid herself in [the 
trunk of] a rotted tree. She died in February from hunger and deep frost, and she was 
dispatched with a pure soul to the paradise of bliss, to her Bridegroom. 

But the other Sister, Honoria of Burke, was led away naked and ruthlessly beaten by 
those dissolute soldiers and torturers, and when they saw that she was numb from the cold, 
they took her like a bundle of wood and threw her onto a barge (which was to cross the lake) 
with such force that she shattered three ribs. Arriving at the shore, seeing that she was already 
half-dead and dying, they left her and her servant. [Honoria died there, but the servant lived to 
tell the tale.] 



THE ANGELS DEFENDED HER FROM ATTACK 

Her brother and her bachelor uncle were so disturbed that Columba [of Rieti, +1501] 
sedately refused to agree to their plans for her marriage that they had it in for her and began to 
think about her death. One time when Columba was leaving church, this same brother (filled 
with anger) together with the uncle and another bad companion were lying in ambush for her at 
a certain spot and struck the holy girl. But they saw that Columba was surrounded by a troop of 
angels, in the midst of which was also St. Dominic, and he began to threaten them harshly, 
saying "You lions on the prowl, what do you have against this lamb dedicated to me? You 
ravens from hell and hawks on the prey, what do you have against this heavenly dove? She 
should not be subjected to your attack." Hearing and seeing this, their hearts were softened, 
and they did not dare to harass the blessed girl any longer. 



THE ROSES OF SISTER MARGARET 

Sister Margaret Fontani, a Third Order sister from Modena, spurned the world and took 
different means to preserve the virtues of her innocence and mortify her flesh: not sleeping 
except for [lying] a little while on bare boards, and thus remaining at prayer during the night, 
doing harsh penances, fasting for many weeks during the year - so that by these mortifications 
she might please God and earn [a place in] heaven. God showed the holiness of his pious 
handmaid by many miracles, particularly by an act of charity towards her neighbor. For while 
she was staying at home with her own brother, who lived well, she secretly gave alms to the 
poor before he [would], and a miraculous thing happened to her. 



37 



Once there was a great famine in Modena, and because of it the poor were dying. 
Seeing the abundance of food at her brother's and hearing the advice of Tobias: Si multum tibi 
fuerit, abundantertribue (If you have much, give alms out of your abundance) [Tob4:9], one day 
during Christmas week she secretly took many rolls of bread and distributed them to the poor. 
Her brother stopped her and asked her what she was carrying in her bundle. Being afraid of 
him, she answered him with great simplicity that it was roses (because in God's eyes alms and 
deeds of mercy are like fragrant flowers). Curious to see if this were true, her brother asked her 
to show him these roses. Whereupon God in his omnipotence brought it about that the slices of 
bread and other fragments were transformed into fragrant and fresh roses, [even though] it was 
winter. Seeing this, Margaret's brother was astounded and asked how did it come about that 
during [the time of] the cold northeast winds she had such graceful flowers. She answered how 
it was that God in his mercy brought this about: "If you, my brother, would only be merciful in 
giving alms from the bread, which he gave you in such conspicuous abundance..." With these 
words the devout servant brought her brother to give alms generously, for he not only gave out 
enough food himself but he also allowed Margaret to take what was needed for the poor. 



Many thanks to Grzegorz Mazur, OP, for his corrections. Advent, 2005. 



1 The Biblical translations are taken from the NAB, 1971. 

2 In a footnote, Fr. Salij adds the following: Ofka Piastowna (+1359), a saintly Dominican nun from 
Raciborz. To this day she enjoys an active cult in Upper Silesia, especially in her home city and is one of 
the Polish candidates for canonization. 



38 



SIMON 



I once had all the answers 

safely nested away. 

I once knew who I was 

and the path I was to take. 

Why, then, did I pause to look? 

Why interrupt the evenness my life had become, 

the status quo that beat 

so steadily and assuredly 

in the hollow where my heart 

was to have been? 

But for my curiosity 

the answers would still be mine. 

One casual glance erased forever 

those easy, formulaic solutions 

And chanced to rest on the face 

that now gives me no rest. 

Streaked and stricken, 

it haunts me still with its unspeakable 

pain and sorrow born of a love 

I did not then and cannot yet 

fathom. 

Yoked with him beneath the wood 

I looked into his eyes 

And all my answers were lost, forever drowned 

in that cup where taking dies 

and giving is eternally reborn. 

Mo, it was not my choice 

and he was not my Lord. 

But I shouldered his yoke 

and trod in his steps, 

Leaving behind my tidy nest of answers 

and the self I knew 

To become forever 

His. 



Sister Maria Simona, O.P. 
Lufkin, TX 



39 



REVISITING FAMILIAR TERRITORY 
Tuning Our Minds to Our Voices 



Sister Mary Magdalen Braun, O.P. 
Farmington Hills, Ml 



A verse from one of the hymns sometimes sung at Vespers or Compline has a power 
to evoke before our minds a vast panorama of worship: 

As o'er each continent and island, 
The dawn leads on another day, 
The voice of prayer is never silent, 
Nor dies the strain of praise away. 

In the verse before it we sing: 

We thank thee that thy Church unsleeping 
While earth rolls onward into light, 
Through all the world her watch is keeping, 
And rests not now by day or night. 

"The Day Thou Gavest Lord" Worship Hymnal II, 263 

The words evoke a kind of mystical vision of one aspect of the universe: wave after 
wave of praise and prayer sweeping successively and unceasingly across our globe, giving 
glory to our Creator and Savior. 

The Sacred Scriptures set the example and norm for this. How many times they 
direct us to survey the universe with praise on our lips in words such as those of the 
Psalmist: Cry out with joy to the Lord, all the earth (Ps 100). ...Praise the Lord from the 
heavens ...praise him all his angels ... praise him sun and moon ... praise him shining stars. 
...Praise the Lord from the earth ...sea creatures ...mountains, hills, trees, beasts, birds... 
all earth's kings and peoples (Ps 148). 

Amid this vast sea of praise we begin each day as a community with a call for God's 
help: "O Lord, open my lips and my mouth will proclaim your praise." And at the beginning of 
the other hours of the day's Office: "O God come to my assistance; Lord make haste to help 
me." It is the Holy Spirit who has inspired the words of this our call for help in our littleness. 
He knows so well our weakness in the face of the demands of this Office of prayer. The work 
is so great; I am so small! "Open my lips; come to my assistance; make haste!" Our call for 
help, repeated at each celebration, brings us as well as him to attention. Brief though it is, it 
becomes a moment to recollect ourselves in awe at the thought of what we are about to 
do... and to draw close to him in dependence on his help. 

This global vision of the far reaches of the Church's Prayer is given a further nuance 
in the opening invitation of the first Hour of each day's Office. After we have asked the Lord 
to be present and open our lips, we call out to our brothers and sisters everywhere on the 
earth and to the whole universe to be present with us: "Come", we sing out in the words of 
the Invitatory. "Come!" "Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the rock who 
saves us" -- "Come let us worship the Lord our maker" ... "Come let us worship the King of 
martyrs", "Christ the chief shepherd of the flock". "Come let us adore the fount of all 
wisdom"... "the Lamb with the virgins who followed him" ..."let us worship God, wonderful in 
his saints." Come, come everybody on the earth, let us worship. Oh, come! That brief word 



40 



"come" embraces a wealth of meaning. It brings into focus our priestly role in the Church 
through our offering of the "sacrifice of praise". With only a few exceptions, that imperative 
call is there every day to remind us that our prayer and our very life are not for ourselves 
alone. We extend our "Come" to gather around us our brothers and sisters everywhere, with 
all their needs and desires, their hopes and their fears, their sinfulness and their beauty. And 
as we bow down in the repeated "Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit" 
throughout the Office, we enfold them, so that they are bowing down together with us. 

We find what we might term the official description of the Liturgy of the Hours in The 
Catechism of the Catholic Church: There we read in #1174: 

The mystery of Christ, his Incarnation and Passover which we celebrate in 
the Eucharist ...permeates and transfigures the time of each day through the 
celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours, "the Divine Office." This celebration, 
faithful to the apostolic exhortations to "pray constantly" is 'so devised that the 
whole course of the day and night is made holy by the praise of Go 
(Sacrosanctum concilium 84). In this "public prayer of the Church" (SC 98), 
the faithful (clergy, religious, and lay people) exercise the royal priesthood of 
the baptized. Celebrated in 'the form approved by the Church' the Liturgy of 
the Hours is "truly the voice of the Bride herself addressed to her Bridegroom. 
It is the very prayer which Christ himself together with his Body addresses to 
the Father" (SC 84). 

We linger on this description in order to reflect with greater awareness on how this 
vision of prayer and praise envelopes our whole life through our answering the call to be a 
nun in the Order of Preachers. Love for the Divine Office is in our bloodstream as an 
inheritance from St. Dominic. No need to spend time proving his zeal for its wholehearted 
rendition by the friars! -- As far as the nuns are concerned, it is curious that both the very 
first Constitutions of the Nuns as well as the Constitutions of Montargis on which Humbert of 
Romans based his definitive edition begin with regulations regarding the celebration of the 
Office. That tells us something about the importance attached to it, and the regard for its 
proper celebration held by our earliest nun-forbears. 

Beyond what profession as a nun of the Order carries with it of love for the choral 
rendition of the Office, we are confirmed in our appreciation of its sacredness and nobility by 
the words of the General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours: 

When a person prays the Liturgy of the Hours, he is saying the Psalms, not 
just in his own name, but truly in the name of the whole Church ...in fact 
praying in the name of Christ himself (#108). 

Reminding ourselves of this, automatically helps focus our attention as we prepare to 
sing each hour of the Office when it comes in turn to sanctify the course of the day. 

Even only a brief survey of the history of the Office gives us a greater realization of 
the worship of God's people through the ages into which our life is inserted. In that vast 
scene of worship it is our privilege to have been eternally predestined by God to be women 
"appointed for the work of divine praise" so that "the solemn celebration of the liturgy is the 
heart of our whole life and the chief source of its unity" (LCM 75). 



41 



We all know that its origins and meaning and purpose have sources that precede the 
Christian era. There is its Israelite background and roots reaching back to Moses with 
prescribed times, and even the prayers themselves, embedded in the daily life of the 
Chosen People. --. At sunrise and toward the closing of the day, faithfully they paused in the 
presence of the Lord with ritual prayers of praise and of blessing, keeping themselves aware 
of their covenant-relationship with him. Hear, O Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord alone 
(Deut 6:4). Blessed are you, O Lord, God of Abraham, God of Isaac and God of Jacob, Lord 
of heaven and earth, our shield and the shield of our fathers. 

The Jews' remembrance of their covenant duty and inheritance guided them in their 
standing before God in two prescribed times of day: for the morning recitation of the Shema 
and for the Eighteen Benedictions of the evening. Here we have the idea of specified times 
of standing awarely in God's Presence, remembering one's duty to and dependence on him, 
and the blessings received from him. This contact with God was so much in the very fabric 
of the Jews' daily life that they would not even think of not making that contact. Jesus knew it 
thus in his everyday life. 

In the fourth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel there are a few words in verse 16 that can 
furnish an intriguing picture of Jesus engaged in liturgy. The picture is relevant to our 
present subject and can lead us into union with him in a way we might not have thought 
about before. Luke writes: He came to Nazareth, where he had grown up, and went 
according to his custom into the synagogue on the Sabbath day (4:16). We are familiar with 
the incident: how Jesus stands to read and selects the text from Isaias. But rather than 
dwelling on the text from Isaias, let us look at the implications in the Evangelist's words 
telling us that Jesus went into the synagogue according to his custom.... They allow us to 
picture Jesus, standing in choir as it were - as he had stood according to custom for at least 
eighteen years preceding that moment, - worshipping his Father in the obscurity of being 
simply one among his fellow townsmen engaged in the prescribed liturgical service of the 
day. He emptied himself to give us this model, too, and to give us an additional reason for 
deepening our grateful love for him. Reverently probing into his inner dispositions, and those 
of Mary and Joseph too, engaged in community worship can feed our fervor as we pray in 
the midst of our sisters in the daily routine of the Divine Office. 

By the time of the New Testament writings we know that there were several other 
specific "hours" of prayer. We find the apostles observing them. The public prayers of the 
first Jewish-Christian converts would naturally have been a carry-over from the synagogue 
gatherings and the daily prayers at home as well as from the hours of worship in the Temple. 

The ideal of "ceaseless prayer" -- of "praying constantly" - is placed before the 
individual believer by Jesus in the Gospel, by St. Paul and in other writings of the New 
Testament period. But there are also indications of community liturgy: meetings of believers 
to pray together. Their precise organization - outside of that for the Eucharist -- eludes our 
tracing the details, but some of the admonitions that St. Paul was obliged to give in their 
regard tell us that the participation was very much alive! 

From the beginning, types and themes and texts from the Old Testament scriptures 
have formed part of Christian prayer. We, today, stand upon and prolong the tradition of a 
people that reaches very far back, indeed. We can even allow ourselves a mystic sense of 
companionship with our brothers and sisters who lived and worshipped in the ages of the 
patriarchs and prophets; we can stretch back to enter into what their experience might have 
been, and we can draw them into our enjoyment of the fulfillment of what they longed for. 



42 



Jesus would be our first and chief model in this union of prayer, gathering up as he does -- in 
himself — the prayer of all the children of his Father. ... As our Constitutions put it: "...the 
nuns in union with Christ, glorify God for the eternal purpose of his will and the marvelous 
dispensation of grace" in a "joyful celebration [that] joins the pilgrim Church to the Church in 
glory" (LCM 75). What a tremendous vista of the meaning and chief responsibility of our 
vocation as nuns of the Order of Preachers. 

In the early centuries of the Church we find evidence of several models that had an 
influence and to various degrees were formative of the Office as we have it today. Indeed, 
far from remaining static the evolution of God's daily public praise has continued over the 
centuries right down into our own lifetime. Entwined in this evolution the constants have 
always been there: readings from Scripture, praise and petition in a common assembly, 
song, and pause for silent meditation. 

When tracing the early development of the liturgy, monastic people, such as we, are 
usually familiar with the picture of the early period that Cassian has left us of the fixed times 
for what we can call the Liturgy of the Hours of the desert monks in Egypt. The celebration is 
both stark and lengthy; the desert monks followed their own instinct in a style that matched 
the rest of their manner of life. We have read the description: night vigil of the whole body of 
monks, a single cantor rising to slowly recite the Psalms, usually twelve in number - one by 
one - while the listening monks are seated; meditating in silence. At a signal, they rise after 
each psalm, pray in silence with hands uplifted, then prostrate in worship. They rise at a 
prayer recited by the leader in the name of all, and then seat themselves for a repetition of 
the rite for each of the Psalms. 

We have read this description often enough to have unconsciously concluded that 
this is how the pattern of the Liturgy of the Hours all began. But Cassian was writing at the 
beginning of the fifth century for the guidance of groups of monks in the Europe of his own 
time about what he had witnessed at the end of the fourth century. It had not all jumped into 
place and begun only then and there. While the monks of the desert were praying together 
thus, other believers had already been gathering at fixed times of the day to worship 
together. These had their own distinct patterns, manner and orientation for the sanctification 
of the hours of the day that were more congruent with urban life. We find them by the time of 
Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian and Origen in the early third century when Christians were 
still living under threat of persecution - a hundred years before peace came to the Church 
under Constantine. 

Moving into the succeeding centuries the Liturgy of the Hours gradually flourished. 
Celebrated by the faithful in urban settings and more solemnly by canons in the great 
cathedrals it is joined to the monks in monasteries multiplied in both the East and the West. 
One example is the care given to its development by Charlemagne, and there is witness to 
this in the brief time-identification given in fine print in the margin of many of our Ordinary 
hymns at the Office. There we find reference to St. Ambrose and Prudentius in the late 
fourth century as well as composers of hymns in the seventh and ninth century. How many 
million worshippers of the past have sung these same hymns! 

The period extending from the sixteenth century to our own time which includes Pope 
Pius V and the reform of the liturgy, has witnessed a certain solidification and, through the 
invention of the printing press, a new availability of the Office for all. We have to remind 
ourselves of what celebrating the Office must have been like before the breviary! But while 
the breviary has brought many advantages to the celebration, we have also to be on our 



43 



guard against losing the purpose and impact of such units as the short readings at most of 
the Hours with their response. For those who could only listen, the reading was nourishment 
from the Word for which they waited eagerly and to which they gratefully assented in a 
response ordinarily itself consisting of words from the Bible. On our part, we risk -- 
particularly at the lesser Hours -- rendering them in a way which limits our vision and 
spiritual profit. 

The instinct to come together to pray, to meet God as a community is a testified 
reality of man's social life. While in the very beginning of the liturgy of the Church we find it 
connected with the Eucharist, it gradually developed structures outside the Eucharist. 

The Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy states clearly that "...liturgical services 
pertain to the whole Body of the Church. They manifest it and have effects upon it (SC 26). 
The second sentence of that quotation says something to which we might give some 
renewed attention. It reminds us that liturgical services have effects, not only on those who 
participate in them but on the whole Body of the Church. The fact that what we are about to 
do affects the whole Church is something to think about as the signal for the Office 
summons us to come together, breaking into the course of our day over and over again, to 
draw us into, and become the prayer of all. 

But the Council document also assures us that "The Divine Office ...is a source of 
piety and a nourishment for personal prayer." Further on, we read: "For this reason [those] 
who take part in the Divine Office are earnestly exhorted in the Lord to attune their minds to 
their voices when praying it. To achieve this more fully, they should take steps to improve 
their understanding of the liturgy and of the Bible, especially of the Psalms" (SC 90). 

Most of us are not in need of a great deal of information about the Divine Office, after 
celebrating it every day for ten, twenty, forty, sixty years. But we do need to renew our 
attention to the fact that the liturgy is most intimately interwoven in the fabric of our vocation 
in life. As we have seen from various angles, we are entrusted in a special and public way to 
gathering up in ourselves, by the Church's commissioning, the worship of the whole people 
of God. Our Constitutions confirm this commission. 

However tremendous may be the marvel of it, or our own limitations, we cannot 
change the fact that we are "appointed for the work of divine praise" and "to intercede with 
the Father of mercies for the universal church as well as for the needs and salvation of the 
whole world" (LCM 75). Whatever else may be involved in our call to Dominican 
contemplative life, this is pivotal. It is a case of seeing our life as one in which -- together 
with the Liturgy of the Eucharist -- the solemn celebration of the Office "is the heart of our 
whole life" (LCM 75). And consequently whatever else we do falls into place around it. This 
is a very subtle distinction, but a very important one for the ultimate integrity of our 
Dominican monastic contemplative life. 

The very meaning of our existence is connected with this entrustment. It is a 
responsibility which involves duty, and often the sacrifice of our own personal pursuits, yes. 
But it is a sacred duty and -- above all - it is a gift of love -- a love which re-echoes and joins 
with the love-gift of Christ for the world. 

This paper was originally given In Farmington Hills Monastery as lecture on the Liturgy of the Hours 
presented in a series of "Study-Chapters" on various aspects of the Liturgy. 



44 



LISTENING TO THE WORD OF GOD 1 

Servais Pinckaers, O.P. 
Translated by Sister Mary Thomas, OP. 

Buffalo, NY 

Introduction 2 



As we celebrate the 800th Anniversary of the foundation of the Order of Preachers by 
Saint Dominic, we recall the night of the "Seignadou" when the nuns came into being. What was 
Saint Dominic's intent for the women converts he gathered into the monastery of Blessed Mary 
of Prouihle in August, 1206? How would he later associate them with the holy preaching of his 
brethren, as yet existing only in the mind of God but destined to become the Order of 
Preachers? 

In the Fundamental Constitution of the Nuns (1. II) the answer is clarion clear: "The nuns 
are to seek, ponder and call upon Him in solitude so that the word proceeding from the mouth of 
God may not return to him empty, but may accomplish those things for which it was sent (cf. Is 
55:10)." 

The Word proceeding from the mouth of God, center and purpose of the Order, is the 
heart of our vocation. It is significant that Father Servais Pinckaers, prestigious theologian of the 
Dominican University of Freiburg in Switzerland and inspiration of a whole new generation of 
Dominican Thomistic theologians, should provide a series of essays of a clearly pastoral nature 
for the simple laity living in the neighborhood of the University, and should call it Hunger for the 
Gospel. Out of this collection we have chosen a reflection on listening to the Word of God. 
Designed for "plain people" - as Saint Thomas's Summa Theologiae was designed for 
"beginners" - the disarming simplicity of Father Pinckaers' essay goes deep into the soil of the 
reader's mind and heart, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to 
the eater . 

Sister Mary Thomas, O.P. 
Buffalo, NY 



In this day and age we can't get away with simply accepting and putting into practice the 
religious and moral teaching we received when we were young, without reflecting on it. On 
reaching the threshold of adulthood, we have to adapt the package received in childhood to our 
personal lifestyle, and for many this triggers a crisis. Today, Christian teaching and practice are 
subjected to so much criticism and revision that the Church is beginning to resemble a 
dilapidated house heading for ruin. People are not lacking who tell us the house, the old Church, 
is falling apart and no longer fit to live in. They opt for total reconstruction in line with today's 
tastes and needs. 

Whoever we may be, we have all been affected by the general shake-up following the 
Council. We are forced to ask questions about the fundamentals of our faith and the basis of our 
Christian life. We need to find a foundation solid enough to build on. 

But search as we may, we will never find any foundation firmer than the Word of the 
Lord. Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who 



45 



built his house upon the rock (Mt 7: 24). Isaiah had already said: A voice says, 'Cry!' And I said, 
'What shall I cry?' All flesh is grass, and all its beauty is like the flower of the field. The grass 
withers, the flower fades; but the word of our God will stand forever (Is 40: 6-8). 3 

It is not enough to listen. 

When I speak of listening to the Word of God, I mean giving it an attention that goes 
beyond listening and leads into action. We can't be content with lending an ear to God, the way 
we sit through a pleasant lecture or read a distracting novel. Authentic listening leads to action, 
and would be useless without it. And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do 
them will be like a foolish man who built his house upon the sand (Mt 7: 26). 

A simple, direct listening to the Word of God is the first and absolute condition for 
everything that follows, just as the light that we perceive with our eyes directs all our 
movements. So learning how to listen is the first thing we must do. In our day, its importance is 
decisive. 

Where is the Word of God? 

It is not possible here to give a complete account of the various ways in which God 
speaks to us. I shall simply speak of Scripture, which is the principal form clothing the Word of 
God. Conformity to Scripture is the touchstone for every word that comes to us from God. 

Scripture includes both Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament is far from being 
properly appreciated by us and being viewed as God's word to us. At one time, it was believed 
that the Church forbade Catholics to read it. People came to think that the Old Testament was 
so far surpassed by the New that it no longer had any relevance for us. Up until the seventeenth 
century, however, reading and meditation on the entire Scripture had formed the basis of 
Christian teaching at all levels. 

Today, the Church makes all of Scripture available to us and editions of the Bible have 
proliferated. But the approach to the Old Testament remains difficult, and many are turned off by 
a first reading of the Bible. They get lost, as it were, in a dense forest; they haven't explored this 
territory often enough to know its trails and paths. 

As for the New Testament, which we think we know very well, rare are the people who 
have read any of its books in their entirety, or have perused them often enough to have 
acquired a taste for them as regular nourishment. We are used to hearing bits and pieces of the 
New Testament at Mass, taken out of context. This does not give us an adequate understanding 
of it. Yet these accounts and letters were addressed to Christians like us, or to pagans 
completely ignorant of the Jewish Scriptures. In spite of the cultural progress we are so proud 
of, have we become incapable of grasping the religious teaching lavished on Christians of two 
thousand years ago? 

How should we approach Scripture? 

What is the best way to approach Scripture, or the Gospels, which form the center and 
summit of the Bible? There is a method which I shall call primitive, and so basic that without it all 
introductions to Scripture would be useless, if not harmful. This method is nothing less than a 
simple, direct personal reading, one on one as it were, a little like reading a letter God has sent 
us, which speaks about him and about us. This reading ought to precede any commentary 



46 



(except for an introduction and the necessary rapid notes that will enable us to understand the 
text itself). In this way the text will begin, little by little, to speak to us, and touch us. Such a 
contact is indispensable and decisive. Nothing can take its place. 

This method assumes that all Christians, whatever the degree of their culture, provided 
they have faith, possess an innate ability to read Scripture directly, as if it were a book written 
for them. Actually Scripture, especially the Gospels, is addressed to believers rather than to 
scholars. This means that every Christian possesses the capacity to grasp the kernel of the 
Gospel, the nourishing meat within the shell of words, the Word that will touch him, convert him, 
lead him along the road to God. Better still, this means that God can speak directly to the heart 
of everyone who reads and listens to the Gospel with faith. He reveals himself to them with the 
help of this text, as one person little by little reveals himself to another in an ongoing 
conversation. 

In light of this, I should like to ask you: if God has truly spoken to us in his Scripture, do 
you think all we need to do is listen with a distracted ear to the two or three readings at Sunday 
Mass? If the Lord has spoken to us, is it not because he has something essential to tell us, that 
will interest us personally? If he has taken the pains to send us his Son, is it not because the 
message is vital? Should not listening to the Word of God, therefore, be our priority? Take the 
Gospel in hand. Here is a letter God sends you in friendship, today. Let no person, no pretext, 
stop you from listening to this Word, from joining in this intimate conversation. Have no fear; 
when God wants to talk with you, you don't need to know a foreign language, or have a degree 
in special studies, nor does anyone have to explain it all to you. It's enough that God opens his 
mouth and we open our minds and hearts to him in faith. Through this small opening of faith and 
hearing, all the wisdom of God can penetrate us. We are given a knowledge and experience on 
a different level than human science. 

Pick up the Gospel. It is written for you - for you, and at the same time for the whole 
Church. Think of it as your most precious treasure, a treasure that speaks, that gives life. Do not 
allow anyone, or any specious reasoning, or any difficulty you may encounter, to take it out of 
your hands. The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and 
covered up; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field (Mt 1 3:44). 

Becoming adults in the Church 

People talk a great deal today about adult Christianity, and some seem to think it's 
enough to be living after Vatican II and to take part in the current movement of contestation, to 
become an adult in the faith. To my mind, no one can presume to have acquired maturity in the 
Christian faith, without having made the Gospel -the Evangelists, Peter, Paul -his daily bread. 
As Jesus put it, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the 
mouth of God (Mt 4:4). To develop a taste for the Gospel as the nourishment we consume by 
reading, chew by reflection and prayer, and assimilate by life and practice, this is the condition 
for attaining to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature 
manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ' of which St. Paul speaks (Eph 
4:13). 

The Council highlighted the Church as the People of God. Various organizations such as 
Pastoral Councils, Parish Councils and so forth have tried to draw the laity into a more active 
participation in the life and development of the Church. However, we do not fully deserve the 
name of the People of God, and we cannot take part effectively in the building up of the Church 
in the world, unless we have first silenced our own human ideas and words so as to listen in 



47 



silence to the Word of the Gospel. That Word alone has the power to lay the foundations and 
build up the Church in spite of all human weaknesses. 

Let us read the Gospel 

You can judge from this the importance of a simple, direct, personal reading of the 
Gospel. Throughout, it is God himself, our Father, who is speaking to us. We should read in 
faith, following the Church's understanding and teaching. In humility too, for if we have learned 
some truth in God's school, it's no reason for us to think we've suddenly become masters in 
Israel, and can now interpret the whole Gospel for ourselves and impose our view on others. 

Let us then read the Gospel with direct simplicity, as we would listen to someone 
speaking to us. We should not allow a lack of scientific knowledge to stop us: we can remedy 
that later. Scripture commentaries are useful for those who are already familiar with the text and 
who have found substantial nourishment in it. If we read commentaries before we have made a 
personal discovery of Scripture, they can become a screen blocking the light, an obstacle giving 
us the idea that Scripture is only for specialists. The knowledge the Gospels convey to us is on 
a different plane -- that of realities learned through experience. No book, no science of the 
schools, no reasoning can teach us directly how to love, to hope, to be sincere, courageous. 
These things, of the greatest value, can only be acquired by a wholly personal movement, and 
by example too, which passes them from one person to another. Understanding of the Gospel is 
on this level, if not a higher one, for who could teach us to believe, to hope in God, to love him, if 
not God himself, when he touches us through his Word? 

The Word of God penetrating our lives engenders in us the experience of the very 
realities of which it speaks. This gives us a deeper understanding than we could gain from all 
other teachers and books. As a corroboration of this, let me quote a passage from a classic I 
warmly recommend to you, the Conferences of Cassian. He is speaking about the prayer of the 
Psalms: 

Sacred Scripture is clearer, and its inner core reveals itself to us when our 
experience not only perceives but anticipates its thought, and the meanings of 
the words are disclosed to us less by exegesis than by our own experience. 
When we have the same disposition in our heart with which each psalm was 
originally sung or composed, then we become like its author, grasping its 
significance beforehand rather than afterward. That is, we first take in the power 
of what is said, rather than the knowledge of it.... Having been taught by what we 
ourselves feel, we gain knowledge of the Psalms not through hearsay, but rather, 
we touch realities directly, having perceived them in our own depths as in a very 
clear mirror. From the inner disposition of our hearts we bring forth not what has 
been committed to memory but what is inborn in the very nature of things. Thus 
we penetrate the meaning of the Psalms not through the written text but with 
experience leading the way (Conference 10, n. 5). 



1 First published in The Dominican Torch, Vol. Ill, no. 4. Reprinted with permission of editor. 

2 Introduction by Sr. Mary Thomas, O.P., translator. 

3 For Biblical quotations the Catholic Edition of the Revised Standard Version, 1957 has been used. 



48 



SNAPSHOTS OF THE TRINITY IN THE FOUR GOSPELS 

Parts III and IV - Mark and John 

Sister Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella, O.P. 
Farmington Hills, Ml 



Part III: The Son of God in Mark's Gospel 

My search for the Trinitarian mystery as put forth in the four Gospels has led me to 
examine Mark's Gospel with the specific intent of discovering in his version of the Good News a 
particularly meaningful portrait of Jesus as the Son of God. We know, of course, that all the 
Gospels, indeed the entire New Testament, focuses on Jesus as its subject. What is there, then, 
of particular note about Mark's Gospel? Is the quality of Sonship -- Jesus as Son of God -- 
prominent in Mark, as fatherhood was for Matthew and the Holy Spirit for Luke? And if so, how? 

I found my excursion through Mark's Gospel more difficult than those made earlier 
through Matthew and Luke. Mark's Gospel is very short and concise. There are no "special" 
passages in Mark to savor, such as the Sermon on the Mount or the Prodigal Son. I missed the 
early introductory chapters on the infancy of Jesus, so beautiful in themselves and setting the 
tone for the rest to follow. Mark's is the shortest of the Gospels. Moreover, almost all of Mark is 
repeated by either Matthew or Luke, if not both. There are only three small episodes -- two 
miracle stories and one parable -- that Mark has recorded that the other Synoptics have left 
aside. By contrast with these, Mark's Gospel seems stark, almost unfinished, in quality. It does 
not have the magnificent structure and solemnity of expression so evident in Matthew, nor the 
gentle restrained tones so characteristic of Luke. 

Its style is somewhat haphazard and the quick succession of events leads me to think of 
it as "a Gospel of first impressions," a record of the immediate impact Jesus made on his 
contemporaries. Mark's Gospel is most likely the earliest and therefore the most primitive. In 
both Matthew and Luke, and even more so in John, we can discern a longer period of reflection. 
Mark has not had enough time to look back, as Matthew does, to the many foreshadowings of 
the mystery in the Old Testament. Nor does he look ahead to the future, as does Luke, 
anchoring our hope in the guiding presence of the Spirit. Mark's Gospel is direct and fresh in its 
approach. Here we come closest to the first gropings of the early Church to understand who 
Jesus was and perhaps to the very personality of Jesus himself. 



Markan Simplicity 

Mark does not elaborate. He gives us the bare minimum of facts. For example, he often 
tells us that Jesus preached but he offers few examples. There are no long discourses in Mark 
and only a sampling of the parables. We must wait for Matthew and Luke to delineate more 
clearly the content of what Jesus actually said. Again, Mark tells us that Jesus was tempted in 
the desert but it is Matthew and Luke who tell us how. We learn nothing of the childhood or 
youth of Jesus from Mark. Even the resurrection account is stripped to a statement of the empty 
tomb. Mark has only one point to make in his narrative and that is to manifest the Crucified 
Messiah. It is Jesus on the Cross who captures our attention first. 

On the other hand, it is Mark who often gives us a wealth of small details omitted by the 
other Synoptics, making his account come alive, dynamically real. For example, in the cure of 



49 



the paralytic (2:1-12), only Mark spells out for us that the paralytic was carried by four men and 
that they stripped the roof and made an opening in it before lowering the stretcher in front of 
Jesus. In the multiplication of the loaves (6:30-44), only Mark of the Synoptics gives us the 
dialogue that ensued between Jesus and his disciples regarding the situation of the crowds and 
what was to be done about it. John, of course, goes further and tells us that Jesus initiated the 
conversation and names Philip and Andrew as his interlocutors (Jn 6:5-10). But this penetrating 
glance into the person of Jesus was important for the first of the evangelists too. 

Mark brings us into contact with the human side of Jesus. He does not hesitate to 
describe the human sentiments of Jesus omitted by Matthew and Luke. In the story of the cure 
of the leper, only Mark tells us that Jesus felt sorry for him (1 :41 ). Only Mark gives an instance 
of Jesus giving a stern warning (1 :43), and of experiencing grief and anger (3:5). Both Mark and 
Luke give us the story of the widow's mite. However, Luke limits himself to saying that Jesus 
looked up and happened to notice the poor widow putting in her two small coins (Lk 21:1-4). 
Mark tells us more specifically (12:41-44) that Jesus was watching the people put their money 
into the treasury and when he saw the poor widow with her two small coins, he gathered the 
disciples around him to tell them about her. In the story of Jesus and the children, only Mark 
tells us that Jesus was indignant when the disciples turned them away, and that he put his arms 
around them and gave them his blessing (10:13-16). And in the encounter with the rich young 
man, only Mark tells us that Jesus looked steadily at him and loved him (1 0:1 7-22). All of these 
intimate details, proper to Mark, as well as, conversely, the paucity of Mark's theological 
enlargement, help us to rivet our attention directly on the person of Jesus. 



Focus on Jesus 

Mark begins his Gospel, very simply and straightforwardly, with the words The beginning 
of the Good News about Jesus Christ, the Son of God (1:1). Immediately, all attention is fixed 
squarely on Jesus himself and he is identified at once as the Son of God. Matthew begins, A 
genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham (Mt 1:1); and Luke is 
interested in drawing up an account of the events that have taken place among us (cf. Lk 1 :1-4). 

For Mark, the question is "Who is Jesus?" He wants to tell us the good news about 
Jesus, the good news preached by Jesus and, especially, that Jesus himself is the good news. 1 
Throughout the Gospel, Jesus is the center of all the action. Only Jesus teaches in Mark's 
Gospel. There is nothing, for instance, of John the Baptist's eschatological preaching in Mark as 
there is in Matthew (Mt 3:7-1 1 ) nor of his ethical admonitions as recorded by Luke (Lk 3:10-14). 2 
Mark is interested only in the person of Jesus. There are no side issues or developments of 
secondary themes to distract from the central figure. Everything points to Jesus; all else is 
subordinated to him. 

Where Matthew (13:10) and Luke (8:10) speak of the mysteries of the kingdom of God, 
Mark (4:11) uses the word in the singular. For him, there is only one mystery -- translated 
"secret" in the Jerusalem Bible, probably to coincide with Mark's general theme of the Messianic 
secret — and that is Jesus himself. The disciples are privileged to know him who embodies in 
his own person the entire message of the Gospel. 

Mark's theology, although succinct, is yet immensely rich in content. As do the other 
Synoptics, Mark carefully records the theophany following the Baptism of Jesus but, unlike the 
other evangelists, he alone directly states that Jesus received baptism (1 :9-1 1 ). Matthew tells us 
that Jesus intended to be baptized and that, at his insistence, John yielded to him (Mt 3:13-17); 



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and both Matthew and Luke (Lk 3:21-22), refer to the Baptism as an accomplished fact. 3 Only 
Mark identifies both the grandeur and the humility of Jesus at this key moment by telling us 
plainly that Jesus... was baptized in the Jordan by John (1:9). This is another of the ways in 
which Mark grounds us in the mystery of Jesus himself. 

Mark's account of the temptation of Jesus (1:12-13), very brief, also has its own 
theological significance. By not delineating the individual temptations of Jesus as do Matthew 
and Luke, Mark draws attention to the larger, cosmic dimension of Jesus in direct combat with 
the demonic powers. Mark draws a parallel between Jesus being driven into the desert by the 
Spirit, and Jesus himself later driving out the spirits of evil. 4 For Mark, the temptation scene is a 
foreshadowing of the public ministry of Jesus and the key to interpreting the many exorcisms 
and battles with unclean spirits included in the narrative. 5 We find the same focus on Jesus in 
the scene of the Transfiguration. While Matthew portrays Jesus as the new Moses (Mt 17:1-9); 
and Luke attends to the passage he was to accomplish in Jerusalem (Lk 9:2-1 0); Mark's whole 
thrust is on the beauty of Jesus himself. When it is all over and the vision fades, the disciples 
look up and see only Jesus (9:2-8). 

Only Jesus is the inspiration behind the Messianic secret too. Jesus is named Son of 
God in the very first verse but he cannot be recognized as such until we have been prepared to 
accept the consequences. The deliberate attempts of Jesus to conceal his identity accentuate 
the majesty of his presence and place him in sharp contrast to the clamor of the demons and 
the shallow enthusiasm of the crowds. Jesus is set apart from the disciples too. Their minds 
grow dimmer as the brilliance of the light of the mystery of Jesus intensifies. One group after 
another falls away from him. The religious leaders plot against him; the relatives think he is out 
of his mind; the disciples cannot understand. In the end they desert him completely until Jesus 
stands alone as the message and model of divine Sonship. 

Geographically, Mark constructs his Gospel as a procession from Galilee to Jerusalem 
which Jesus makes amid the growing hostility that culminates in his death. Luke picks up the 
same journey motif but with far greater fanfare and to different theological purpose. In Luke, 
Jesus begins his journey toward death by a resolute choice (cf. Lk 9:51) and readers are 
reminded of this advance to Jerusalem periodically throughout the subsequent narrative (Lk 
9:53. 57; 1 0: 1 ; 1 3:22.33; 17:11). His intent is to highlight the Holy City as the locus of salvation. 
For Mark, however, only the mystery of the Cross is important, and he who is transfixed upon it - 
-the Crucified Messiah. 



The Son of God 

"The Crucified Messiah" — a contradiction in terms, almost an oxymoron, and Mark 
intends for us to read it that way: a paradox, incomprehensible, a mystery. Who is Jesus? A 
man of remarkable power and authority, Mark answers, able to forgive sins (2:5) and cast out 
devils (5:1-20). Jesus was Lord of the Sabbath (2:28), He commanded the sea (4:39-41) and 
raised the dead (5:39-41 ). Jesus taught with authority (1 :22. 27; 1 1 :28-33), had foreknowledge 
of the future and ability to direct events (11:2-6. 13; 14:13-15). Even the evil spirits recognized 
him and came out shrieking, You are the Son of God (1:24; 3:11; 5:7). 6 How then can he have 
been crucified? 

Son of God is Mark's foremost title for Jesus and the key to his identity. It is not used 
often but the text is punctuated with its use at certain significant junctures, each with a reference 
to the Cross. The Gospel opens with the solemn proclamation that Jesus is the Christ, the Son 



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of God (1:1) and concludes with that same recognition at his death by the Roman centurion 
(15:39). Between these two brackets, the voice of the Father twice confirms his identity and 
Jesus himself affirms that he is indeed the Son of God at the official interrogations that 
condemned him to death. Three shafts of light piercing the gathering darkness of 
incomprehension and hostility: The first, at the baptism inaugurating his public ministry, the 
voice from heaven declares, You are my Son, the Beloved. My favor rests on You (1:11). In 
Mark's version, only Jesus hears the voice. 7 The Father is speaking exclusively to him; his 
identity remains his personal secret. A second stage is reached when Jesus, having elicited a 
confession of faith and the pledge of personal allegiance from his disciples, now announces to 
them his impending death. Again the voice from heaven resounds, this time at the 
Transfiguration and directly to the disciples as they are rapt in vision of Jesus' transcendent 
glory, This is my Son, the Beloved. Listen to him (9:7). And finally, a third clear pronouncement 
made by Jesus before the whole assembly of the Sanhedrin and in the presence of the high 
priest. Are you the Christ, ... the Son of the Blessed One? Jesus is asked. / am, he answered 
(14:62) and went on to predict his second coming to remove all possible doubt about his 
meaning. His hearers understood and judged him deserving of death. 

It is interesting to note that Mark does not use the title Son of God as Matthew does 
following the incident of Jesus walking on the water and calming the sea. In Matthew's version, 
the disciples already recognize Jesus as the Son of God at this early stage and bow down 
before him saying, Truly you are the Son of God (Mt 14:33). In Mark, they are utterly and 
completely dumbfounded. . . Their minds were closed (6:52). And again in Mark, Peter's reply to 
Jesus' question, Who do you say I am? is simply You are the Christ (8:30). In Matthew, Peter 
not only acknowledges that Jesus is the Messiah but adds, the Son of the living God (Mt 1 6: 1 6). 
In Mark, this complete understanding is reserved to the end. Only in light of the Cross is the 
mystery of Jesus as the Son of God grasped. The centurion ... had seen how he died, and he 
said, In truth this man was a son of God (15:39). 



The Meaning of Sonship 

The word "son" itself evokes a wide variation of meaning 8 and we may assume it was 
Mark's intention to incorporate all of them into his text. It may refer to royalty and kingship as in 
psalm 2:7: You are my son, today I have become your father and in the prophecy of Nathan, / 
will be a father to him and he a son to me (2 Sam 7:14). Implied in these texts and in others too 
numerous to recall here, are predilection and choice, and an investment with divine power and 
authority. 

The Servant Songs of Isaiah (Is 42: 1-9; 49: 1-6; 50: 4-1 1 ; 52:13-53:12) suggest another 
image altogether. Although these texts also contain references to divine election, as well as to 
greatness once the ordeal is past, the emphasis is on the mission entrusted to the mysterious 
Servant of bringing God's salvation to the people and on the outrage and contempt that will be 
his lot in the accomplishment of his task. The lessons here are discipleship, fidelity, gentleness 
and patience, and the free-will offering of himself for sinners whose guilt he takes upon himself. 

In yet another series of texts, the word "son" designates Israel itself. 9 For example, in 
Exodus 4:22, Moses is instructed to say to Pharaoh, Israel is my first born son. In Deuteronomy 
1:31, we read, [the Lord] carried you, as a man carries his child, all along the road... and in 
Jeremiah 31 :9, For I am a father to Israel, and Ephraim is my first born son. The covenantal 
bond of God with Israel, running through the entire Old Testament, is fundamentally a father-son 
relationship. / will be their God and they will be my people (Jer 31 :33). 



52 



The Book of Wisdom moves in still another direction when it equates divine Sonship 
with suffering for virtue's sake. Let us lie in wait for the virtuous man, since he annoys us and 
opposes our way of life... He claims to have knowledge of God and calls himself a son of the 
Lord... If the virtuous man is God's son, God will take his part (Wis 2:12. 13. 18). 

There is testing involved in sonship as we read in the story of Abraham and the sacrifice 
of Isaac, Your son... whom you love (Gen 22:1). Abraham proved his devotion to God by not 
withholding his most prized possession. In all these variegated examples, rich in complexity and 
meaning, are common threads which overlap in sentiments of divine favor, intimacy, profundity 
of love and reciprocity. 

There is still one further attestation of divine Sonship in Mark's Gospel - that of Jesus in 
Gethsemane, in the acceptance of his fate. Abba (Father) he said, everything is possible for 
you. Take this cup away from me. But let it be as you, not I would have it (14:36). Only Mark 
uses the intimate term of tender, trustful affection: Abba. Matthew's more formal My Father {Mi 
26:42) and Luke's avoidance of Aramaic expressions (cf. Lk 22:42) do not convey the same 
childlike confidence or at least not to the same degree. Each evangelist has his own vision, 
each his own detail, to color his portrait of Jesus. Matthew highlights the Father with symbols of 
strength and protection. Mark's image is the reverse. His interest touches Jesus more directly; 
his approach is from the side of the Son. Mark's accent is on filial obedience, trustful surrender 
and the simple confidence of a small child knowing he is safe in his father's arms. Abba. 

We have already noted the power and authority with which Jesus was endowed and 
which so captivated the popular mind. But the other features of divine Sonship - those of 
service and mission and of suffering for the cause of right and in expiation for others -- these 
were far from the expectations of those who initially welcomed the word with joy. And as the 
realization of all that was entailed in the person and message of Jesus began to be unveiled, 
the minds of his listeners gradually became more and more opaque, more and more unable to 
comprehend. 

The Son of Man 

Commentators generally divide the Gospel of Mark into two main sections, entitled, for 
example: The Mystery of the Messiah, followed by The Mystery of the Son of Man 10 or, in 
another version, The Mystery of Jesus and The Mystery Revealed. 11 It is commonly understood 
that a climax is reached in Mark's Gospel and a turning point occurs with Peter's confession of 
faith (8:27-30). Prior to this moment, attention is fixed on the mystery of Jesus' person and on 
the works he accomplishes. The latter half of the Gospel is devoted to an exposition of the 
nature of messiahship which resides, not in glory as was anticipated, but in suffering and death. 

Son of Man is a self-designating term that Jesus uses to insist on the kind of Messiah he 
is to be: a suffering Messiah, not glamorous or popular, not acclaimed for his miraculous power 
or authoritative presence. In itself, Son of Man is an obscure title with deep roots in the Old 
Testament and other non-biblical apocalyptic literature. 12 Originally it was derived from a 
Hebrew and Aramaic idiom which referred to collective humanity, as in Psalm 8:4: What is man 
that you should spare a thought for him, the son of man that you should care for him? Later it 
was used to designate an individual representative of the whole, 13 somewhat as Adam -- a 
generic word meaning "taken from the soil" - became the name of the first man. It was used 
most often in the Old Testament to indicate man's lowly estate and mortal nature in contrast to 
the divine prerogatives (cf. Ezechiel where it is used ninety three times). The Book of Daniel 
later invested it with overtones of eschatological triumph. Here (Dn 7), Son of Man is used in an 



53 



exalted sense. The human assumes divine qualities in contrast to the terrifying beasts whom 
God destroys. 14 It indicates a single individual upon whom is conferred a royal function of 
dominion over the whole earth. 

Jesus combines these various traditions to expound the truth about himself. First of all, 
he introduces himself as simply human with no claims to superiority over the human condition. 15 
Son of Man is a lowly title. Yet neither are the connotations of divine power and of reaching 
beyond the merely human absent from Jesus' self understanding. It is as Son of Man that he 
has power to forgive sins (2:10) and is Lord of the Sabbath (2:28). And it is the Son of Man who 
serves and gives his life as a ransom for many (1 0:45). It is as Son of Man that he will come in 
the glory of his Father with the holy angels (8:38) and on the clouds of heaven (13:27; 14:62). 
And it is the Son of Man who must suffer grievously, be treated with contempt, who will be 
mocked and scourged and spit upon and put to death and, finally, as Son of Man he will rise 
from the dead (cf. 8:31; 9:12; 10:33-34). 

All of these aspects are open to view in one of the few parables Mark has retained in his 
Gospel -- that of the wicked husbandmen (12:1-12). Here, Jesus designates himself as the 
Beloved Son of the Owner of the vineyard and exposes the plots of the tenants -- the religious 
leaders - to kill him. Divinity is present as well as awareness of his mortal human state. We also 
find traces of the multiple strands of the traditions associated with divine Sonship as mentioned 
earlier. He is the beloved Son, sent on a mission for which he will be covered with opprobrium, 
and will end by laying down his life. The parable concludes with hints of divine vindication. 

It seems that to Mark belongs the distinction of being the first to fuse the image of the 
triumphant Son of Man with that of the Suffering Servant of Isaiah. 16 There is no tradition of a 
suffering Son of Man prior to Mark. Nor is there any overt glory assigned to the mysterious 
Servant of Isaiah for the contempt heaped upon him. But the combination of the two is the key 
that unlocks Mark's Messianic secret. 

Like the title Son of God, that of Son of Man is many layered and enigmatic, lending 
itself to multiple interpretations. In Mark its use is three-dimensional, descriptive in the first place 
of Jesus' human activity; then of his future coming in glory; and finally, bridging these together, 
his suffering, dying and rising. 17 The three aspects cannot be separated. Jesus is both human 
and divine, lowly and exalted; the connecting link is the deep humiliation of the Cross. Taken 
together they form a single whole that underlies and elucidates the Gospel of Mark whose 
message is that Jesus is the Son of God. 



Conclusion of Part III 

The entire message of Mark's Gospel is that Jesus is the Son of God. Stated in the first 
verse, its significance can only be realized at the very end. Sonship is identified with the Cross. 
Jesus is a crucified Messiah. Throughout his Gospel, Mark habitually draws all attention to 
Jesus. There are the touching details and the humanness of Jesus. Then there is the gradual 
falling away of all until Jesus is left alone. Finally, as the spotlight continues to narrow its beam, 
the essence of divine Sonship becomes clear. Early on, already in the opening verses of the 
third chapter (cf. 3:6), we are confronted with the reality of the Cross; its long shadow is cast 
throughout the remaining narrative. The Cross is central for Mark because it is only in the Cross 
that the image of Jesus -- the Crucified Messiah, the Son of God, the Son of Man -- can come 
into focus. 



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There is decided prominence given to Jesus' Sonship in Mark's Gospel. It is not that 
Mark's message is different from that of the other New Testament writers. No. All are in 
agreement with the same basic truth that Jesus suffered, died and rose from the dead. The 
difference lies in the emphasis Mark offers and the intensity with which he presents his 
convictions. 

Mark cues us in on the profound connection between suffering and divine Sonship, or, 
stated in other terms, between suffering and glory. In Mark's Gospel, Jesus proves himself a 
Son -- the Son of God - by taking on himself the status of the Suffering Servant and in his filial 
obedience to the One he calls Abba. And it is in his death that his Sonship is revealed. At the 
same time, it is by the sacrifice he makes of his life that Jesus comes to glory. In Mark, the 
vindication does not come afterward, in the resplendence of the resurrection, as later writers 
indicate. The resurrection is barely mentioned. The glory, for Mark, is in the Cross itself. It is in 
Jesus' death that the Messianic secret comes to light. This is a profound message, shattering all 
our preconceptions and laying bare the rock-bottom foundations of our Christian faith and the 
heritage that is ours as followers of Christ. Mark's Gospel is simple. It is stark. It is also 
profound, staggering in the meaning it proffers. Jesus, the Crucified Messiah, is the Son of God. 



Part IV: Father, Son and Holy Spirit in the Gospel of John 

Finally, we come to John's Gospel, the last of the four to be written and, by contrast, 
strikingly different from the other three. One enters a new world with John's Gospel, an 
awesome world of images and symbols, signs and obscure language. Here we encounter life 
contending with death, light shining through the darkness, truth overthrowing all falsehood. 
John's vision is the mystery of the Word made flesh and the fathomless depths of the Triune 
God. 

Time has elapsed since the earlier Gospels were written, time spent in ongoing 
meditation on the identity of Jesus -- who he was and where he had come from - and on the 
meaning of his life and death. Three prior accounts, addressed to three diverse audiences, and 
reflecting increments of growth in understanding as well as differing aspects of a message too 
rich to be compressed into a single mold, had already been circulated and assimilated by the 
Christian communities. By the time John wrote his Gospel -- between 90 and 110, 
commentators agree - the Church was already moving into a new stage of development. The 
first growth crises of the early Church had been well weathered: continuity with the Jewish 
Scriptures had been firmly established; the new faith was wide open to Gentile believers in 
addition to Jewish. 

But new situations continued to arise, creating fresh questions and demanding new 
answers. The apostles were passing away: how would Jesus' presence be kept alive in the 
Church? The Christian community had by now firmly established its own sacramental and 
liturgical life: what was the connection between these rituals and the historical Jesus of 
Nazareth? 18 Could it be that the Jewish tradition was meant to be transcended, the Old 
Covenant fall away to make room for the New? Questions such as these are at the base of 
John's Gospel. He provides the answer in the person of Jesus of Nazareth, the Word made 
flesh. The Word made flesh in turn initiates us into the mystery of the Trinity. 



55 



John and the Synoptics 

There are glimmers of the triune nature of God in each of the Synoptics, firm but not yet 
sharpened intuitions based on God's three-fold outward activity. Each Synoptic recognizes the 
influence of the Holy Spirit in the life of Jesus. Each recounts his unique relationship to the 
Father. Each further emphasizes one or other of the three Divine Persons in the telling of his 
Gospel story. But it belongs to John to bring these inchoate insights to full expression. With 
Matthew, John looks to the source. While the former alludes to the Father throughout his text, 
the latter directly names God as Father one hundred and seven times. What Matthew could see 
only dimly from afar, John brings into the full light of day, making the Father's love the 
foundation of his doctrine. John shares with Matthew a concern for the Chosen People and a 
love for the Jewish Scriptures. Like Matthew, John wrote his Gospel for the Jews. Both make 
use of Old Testament types to illustrate their understanding of Jesus. However, whereas 
Matthew concentrates more on explicit texts and concrete circumstances, John interprets the 
meaning; his allusions are more spiritualized; he broadens into themes. Matthew stands at the 
beginning of the process of faith formation. He wants to prove that Jesus is the expected 
Messiah by showing how the Old Testament is fulfilled in Jesus. John brings the process 
forward. He is more interested in pointing out how Jewish ideas and institutions are transcended 
and transformed in the New Covenant. 

Alongside Luke, John's Gospel too is a Gospel of the Spirit. Yet, because their two 
purposes are different, their perspectives differ as well. Luke brings out the Holy Spirit's activity 
in relation to Jesus himself; John sees the Holy Spirit as poured out from Jesus in his 
glorification. Luke wants to set in relief the essential part played by the Holy Spirit in the 
spreading of the Gospel. He wants us to know that the Spirit given only to a few in the old 
dispensation is now the possession of all believers. 19 John is more preoccupied with the Holy 
Spirit's internal activity, enabling the Church to come to a deeper understanding of what Jesus 
said and did and of things yet to come. 20 Luke speaks of the Holy Spirit as power, bringing the 
Church to its universal destiny; John's emphasis is on the Spirit as Sanctifier, principle of life 
within the Church. 21 Luke speaks of the Holy Spirit's activity; John of his person. The latter 
builds upon the former. 

John completes Mark as well. Mark's Gospel is the first to be written; John's the last. 
Both focus on Jesus as Son of God, Mark setting the stage for John's fuller insight into the Word 
made flesh in ways the more developed theologies of Matthew and Luke do not. These latter 
extend their treatment of Jesus outward more to the inauguration of God's kingdom. 22 John 
comes back and centralizes our attention once again on Jesus himself. It is as if with John we 
come full circle and end as we have begun, in awe at the person of Jesus. Both Mark and John 
are preoccupied with the humanity of Jesus; both attempt to probe its hidden mystery. The basic 
structure of John's Gospel follows that of Mark. Mark divides his Gospel into two main sections, 
The Mystery of the Messiah, treating of the public life of Jesus, the signs and wonders he 
worked and the initial impact he made on the people; and The Mystery of the Son of Man, 
searching into the deeper reality of the person of Jesus which is contained in the Cross, in his 
passion and death. Similarly, John's Gospel contains two parts, roughly covering the same 
territory. The Book of Signs treats of the public ministry; The Book of Glory, the passion, death 
and resurrection. In both John and Mark, the foreboding of Jesus' death is ever present; both 
place Jesus' glory in his essential Father-Son relationship to God proved by the laying down of 
his life. 

In each of these three instances, John turns a page and offers a fresh synthesis. He 
completes the portraits begun by the Synoptics, picking up where they left off, drawing out and 
interpreting their hidden meaning. In this way, John's Gospel indicates that the first stage of 



56 



development in the life of the Church has ended and a new one about to begin. In the chapter 
just ending, the task of the Church had been to form her own identity, in continuity with, yet 
separate from Judaism; in the chapter just beginning she will move with confidence into the 
Greco-Roman world. Here she will be met by further challenges in the struggle to hammer out 
her faith in terms of unfamiliar philosophical categories. John's Gospel with its crystal clear 
affirmation of the identity of Jesus lights the way ahead. 

Jesus, the Word Made Flesh 

The crowning achievement of John's Gospel is his unequivocal insight that this man 
Jesus [whom] we have heard and seen with our own eyes, [whom] we have watched and 
touched with our hands (Un 1:1) is God in human flesh. It is not enough for John to look at 
Jesus in relation to the kingdom as do the earlier Gospel writers (a Christology from below); he 
looks at Jesus in relation to God (a Christology from above). The Synoptic accounts of Jesus 
are descriptive; they tell us his life story. John's is ontological; he pierces to the heart; John tells 
us who Jesus is. 

John is not concerned to tell us much about Jesus. He assumes that the basic facts of 
Jesus' life are already well known among his readers. Instead, he interprets the events, 
disclosing their underlying meaning. With the Synoptics he shares only a few incidents: 

-- the miracle of the loaves (6:1-15; cf. Mt 14:13-21; Mk 6:32-44; Lk 9:10-17); 
-- the walking on the water (6:16; cf. Mt 14:22-23; Mk 6: 45-52); 
-- the cleansing of the Temple (2:13; cf. Mt 21 : 12-15; Mk 11:11); 

- the triumphal entry into the Holy City on Palm Sunday (12:12-19; cf. Mt 21:1-9; Mk 11:1-10; 
Lk 19:28-38). 

John records alongside the Synoptics: 

- Mary's anointing at Bethany (12:1-8; cf. Mt 26:6-13; Mk 14:3-9); 

- Peter's denials (18:15-27; cf. Mt 26:58, 69-70; Mk 14:54, 66-72; Lk 22:54-62); 

- and the treachery of Judas (1 3:21 ; cf. Mt 26:21-25; Mk 14:18-21 ; Lk 22: 21-23). 

Only one miracle of healing, the cure of the centurion's son (4:43; cf. Mt 8:5-13; Lk 7:1-10), 
among the many described by the Synoptics finds a place in John's Gospel. Instead, John gives 
seven signs, clues to the significance of all that Jesus said and did. 

John relies on types and symbols to create impressions and evoke images in an attempt 
to express the inexpressible. In this way he draws us into the mystery. For John, Jesus is the 
Paschal lamb, the bridegroom, the serpent in the desert, the bread of life, the true vine, the 
good shepherd, the light of the world, every Old Testament type of God's dealings with his 
people, now brought to their completion in Jesus. There is a festive quality to John's Gospel 
with its gifts of light and life, new wine, living water and abundance of food. It opens with a 
wedding feast to which Jesus and his disciples are invited; it closes when the hour announced 
had come and the marriage consummated on the Cross. In between, three times the Passover 
is celebrated, each time marking the importance of the event it signifies; three times an entire 
week is calculated, harking back to Genesis and signaling a new creation in the making. 

John's first and principal image of Jesus, found only in the Prologue but fundamental to 
an understanding of the Gospel as a whole, is that of The Word. Jesus is God's Word, John tells 
us, God's thought, his very mind, the revelation of himself. Throughout the Old Testament, God 
speaks by acting in human history. 23 His words are powerful deeds effecting what they signify. 
God's word was present at creation cf. Gn1; also Pr 8:22-31; Wi 7:12, 21; Si 23:20; 42:16). It 
was embodied in the Law and the prophets (Si 19:20; 24:23-34). It was manifest in kings and 
rulers (1Kg 3:9; Wi 7:27). God's word has a redemptive quality. It is sent out from God on 



57 



mission and returns to God having accomplished the work it was given to do (cf. Is 55:10-1 1) 
Of ourselves, we have no access to God's word; yet God freely gives it to us (Pr 2:6; Jb 28:21 ). 
It leads us back to God (Pr 8:35; 9:5), shows us how to live (Si 4:1 1-22) and is the giver of all 
good things (cf . Si 4: 1 1 -1 9). All of these are manifestations of God himself present and acting in 
the world he made. The final act is God's Word itself made flesh in Jesus. 

Jesus is not merely a word of God. He is The Word, the Son of God, present to God 
before time began, The Word, in eternal dialogue with his Father, a dialogue of light and life, of 
knowledge and love, The Word ever receiving divine life from God as the Father is ever pouring 
it forth, The Word, sent out in every saving word of God uttered throughout the centuries. 

By establishing a rapport between God and God's Word in this way, John illumines from 
within the essential character of the Christian message. Of preeminent importance is 
relationality: The Word in relation to God; God in relation to the world; Jesus in relation to his 
Father and to his disciples; the disciples in relation to one another. No one member stands 
alone. All together we form one divine community. The many conversations, the debates and 
discussions with the Jews, 24 the prolonged discourses, all tell us something of God's own inner 
life and of our sharing in that life, made known and won for us by Jesus. 

The Word was made flesh, he lived among us and we saw his glory, the glory that is his 
as the only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth (1:14). There is no Transfiguration scene in 
John's Gospel. Instead, the awesome splendor of Jesus that was glimpsed only momentarily on 
that one occasion as mentioned by the Synoptics pervades John's entire Gospel. Jesus' 
majestic bearing, his solemn / am statements evocative of divinity, and his overt relationship to 
the Father, proclaim emphatically on every page his divine nature and affirm the glory that he 
manifested to the disciples. 

Acclaiming him as fully divine, John is equally careful to portray Jesus as really and 
entirely human. The Word was made flesh (1:14). The choice of terms is deliberate. Sarx, flesh, 
signifies humanity in its corporeal existence, in its relation to the material world, subject to 
change, corruption, and death. 25 Neither is the verb was made accidental. John wanted to say 
more than merely that the Word inspired Jesus or dwelt in human flesh. John insists that the 
Word was made flesh. This man Jesus in his human flesh is the Word of God. God in Jesus 
truly entered our human sphere. Far from being merely spiritual or symbolic, John gives us 
numerous concrete historical details unmentioned by the Synoptics such as names of persons 
and places or times of day. In addition, John fixes precisely the durations of Jesus' ministry and 
the chronology of his passion. The signs he worked have a clearly material aspect. They effect 
real changes in this world. 26 The eyes of the blind were opened; Lazarus was raised to life 
again. 

The Manhood of Jesus 

He lived among us (1 :14). Jesus is human in every sense of the word. His parentage 
and the circumstances of his childhood are known (cf. 7:14-15, 41-42). He becomes tired (4:6), 
he thirsts (4:7; 1 9:28), he is hurt in the face of betrayal (13:21 ), he knows sorrow (1 1 :33), sheds 
tears (1 1 :35), expresses anguish (12:27), he is tempted (cf. 6:15, 26; 7:24}. Most of all, he has 
friends and shows his love for those closest to him (11:5, 36; 13:1; 20:2). 

The term sarx can also stand for all that is opposed to God, the rejection of and the 
rebellion against God. This is the human world that Jesus entered. And it is here that his glory is 
manifested. Jesus' glory is in his union with God, in his radical antithesis to the character of the 



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world, in his death to all that this world holds dear. Jesus seeks God's glory by standing 
opposed to all falsehood (7:18; 8:54-58), darkness (1:5, 9, 14) and self-seeking (5:41-44). 28 

Many times throughout his Gospel, John refers to Jesus as the man, anthropos. 
Beginning with John the Baptist, A man is coming after me who ranks before me (1:30), the 
Samaritan woman (4:29), the cured paralytic (5:11), the man born blind (9:11,16, 24), each in 
turn refers to Jesus in his humanity, a man or the man. Complaints are registered against the 
human Jesus also. How can this man give us his flesh to eat? (6:52) and You are only a man 
and you claim to be God (1 0:33). In the Passion narrative, Peter is asked, Aren't you one of that 
man's disciples? (18:17) and Pilate likewise asks, What charges do you bring against this man? 
(18:29). The culminating statement, Pilate's Here is the Man (19:15) parallels the acknowledged 
kingship of Jesus as he was handed over to be crucified. Here is your King (19:15). 29 On the 
one side we have the human Jesus at his lowest, most vulnerable point, mocked, scourged, 
crowned with thorns, covered with opprobrium, soon to be led away to crucifixion and death. On 
the other we have the sovereignty of Jesus, majestic in the face of his degradation, reigning in 
glory from the Cross (19:20-21), triumphant over the powers of sin and evil: the Godhead of 
Jesus hidden and manifest in the sarx. 

The mystery of the Incarnation of the Word of God is central and key to an 
understanding of John's Gospel. The Word was made flesh. As God he reveals our sublime 
vocation: all that we are called to, all that we are capable of, all that we may become, through 
him, with him, in him. As man, Jesus reveals the resplendent beauty of God's intimate 
Trinitarian life and his love for the created world. Jesus is the human face of God. To sit at 
God's table we need only look at Jesus, eat his bread, share his life. 



Whoever Sees Jesus Sees the Father 

No one has ever seen God, John tells us. It is the only Son who is nearest the Father's 
heart who has made him known (1:18). Almost every page of John's Gospel unveils the 
fatherhood of God, made known to us in the attitude and stance of Jesus' Sonship. It is by 
gazing upon the Son that we come to know the Father. 

The meaning of Sonship has already been introduced to us in the Prologue. The Word 
was with God and the Word was God (1:1). To be a son means to have received life from 
another. It is a relational term, pointing beyond itself to the source from which the son springs. 
The essential movement of John's Gospel, his primary intent, is to illumine our faith, directing 
our attention beyond the facts of Jesus' earthly existence to their eternal reality in God. Who is 
the Father, then, that Jesus reveals? 

Jesus is the perfect Son of the all holy Father. His entire life was a turning to the Father 
in total surrender, his eyes ever fixed on the Father's will, constantly straining forward to the 
hour when he would return to the Father. And the Father's love for Jesus is just as evident. The 
Father loves the Son, John tells us, and has entrusted everything to him (3:35). He gives him 
authority (17:2), bestows on him the power of judgment (5:22, 27) and promises him the glory 
that was his from the beginning (cf. 17:1 ,5). On his part, Jesus does nothing of himself (8:28). 
He imitates the Father in everything, does only what he sees the Father doing (5:19), teaches 
what has been given him to say (8:40; 12:49-50). The Father and Son are One (10:30; 17:22). 
As the Father gives life, so Jesus gives life to all those whom the Father gives him (5:26; cf. 
1 0:29). Whoever honors the Son honors the Father (5:23), whoever believes in Jesus believes 
in the One who sent him (12:44). There is perfect similarity of action between Father and Son 



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(5:17, 19, 26), total mutual belonging (17:10), complete reciprocity of knowledge (10:15), of 
immanence (10:38) and of love (5:20; 15:1 0). 30 

John tells us that the underlying motive for the Incarnation is love. God loved the world 
so much that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life 
(3:16). In another place he tells us that eternal life consists in knowledge of [the Father], the only 
true God, and Jesus Christ whom [he has] sent (17:3). Knowledge in the Biblical sense is not 
merely the result of an intellectual process. It is the fruit of experience and of personal contact. 31 
It is the counterpart of love, which in turn is not simply an emotion but bears qualities of loyalty, 
intimate knowledge and responsibility. 32 In still another place John tells us plainly, God is love 
(1 Jn 4:8, 16). Love is the revelation itself, the quintessential message of John's Gospel: God's 
love for us, our call to love in like manner, in return. Love supplies the energy that propels the 
dialogue within the Bosom of the Trinity and beyond. 

All of Jesus' life is an expression of love for God and of God's love for him. The mystery 
of the cross is the summit of that revelation. The Johannine view, unlike that of the Synoptics 
who feature Jesus as a man of suffering and in agony, concentrates on the glory of the cross. It 
is the hour of triumph when Jesus passes from this world to the Father, the moment when he 
receives the glory that was his in the beginning, the occasion for him to pass over his life for 
others. In John's Gospel, Jesus is lifted up, enthroned as king on the cross. Lifted up, as the 
serpent was lifted up in the desert to whom we must turn if we are to receive eternal life (3:14); 
lifted up, victorious over the prince of this world, in order to draw all things to himself (1 2: 31-32); 
lifted up, finally, in order to convince his hearers that the One who sent him is truthful and that 
what he declares to the world is what he has heard from the Father (cf. 8: 26-28). Can we say, 
then, that Jesus' enthronement on the cross is a revelation of the Father whose glory -- the glory 
that Jesus unceasingly proclaims - consists in having also, in some incomprehensible way, 
"transcended himself," in effect, laid down his life to give birth to the Word - his Son - in eternal 
generation? / do only what I see the Father doing (5:19), Jesus says. 



Portraits of Trinitarian Love 

Jesus is the good shepherd who lays down his life for his sheep (10:11). He lay[s] it 
down of [his] own free will and it is in [his] power to take it up again [J]his is the command [he 
has] been given by [the] Father (1 0:18). We also read The Father loves me because I lay down 
my life in order to take it up again (10:17, italics mine). Is the command Jesus receives to lay 
down his life and take it up again the reenactment in human flesh of the mystery of charity 
present eternally in the Bosom of the Trinity? 

The institution of the Eucharist on the night before he died, so important in the Synoptic 
accounts and so integral to our faith, is not mentioned by John. Instead, he chooses to replace 
another account of the event with two distinct interpretations of its meaning. Chapter 6, the 
discourse on the bread of life, interprets Jesus' giving of his flesh to eat in terms of our 
relationship to God. Chapter 13, the footwashing, is symbolic of the disciples' relationship to one 
another, resulting from and in imitation of, Jesus' laying down of his life. 

John begins his account of the multiplication of the loaves which serves as an 
introduction to the Eucharistic discourse with the sentence, It was shortly before the Jewish 
feast of Passover (6:4), that annual celebration commemorating the redemption of Israel from 
the oppression of Egypt and so rich in the imagery that characterizes the Christian liturgy of the 
New Covenant. The Jewish Passover was both a sacrifice symbolized by the Paschal lamb and 



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a sacred meal prefigured in the manna by which God fed his people throughout their long 
journey through the desert to the Promised Land. Jesus incorporates both aspects into his 
Eucharistic discourse. In the first place, Jesus invites faith in his teaching, the living bread which 
alone satisfies and nourishes unto eternal life. It can only be received in faith. To hear the 
teaching of the Father and to learn from it, is to come to me. Everybody who believes has 
eternal life. I am the bread of life (6:45, 47). 

Secondly, Jesus insists on the reality of the sacrifice in the eating of his flesh and the 
drinking of his blood (6:53). His body and blood are real food and real drink (6:55). The teaching 
is synonymous with the sacrifice; both have their origin in what Jesus has learned in heaven 
(6:38, 57). And, as if to leave no doubt about the meaning of his words, John points out, After 
this, many of his disciples left him and stopped going with him (6:66). There are incarnational 
overtones in John's Eucharistic account. Can we not discern the Trinity as well? 



The Eternal Wedding Feast 

According to the chiastic structure of John's Gospel, Calvary parallels the Wedding feast 
of Cana. 33 The former, at the beginning of the Gospel, interprets and symbolizes the latter. The 
first anticipates the hour when Jesus is to fulfill his personal destiny and his glory is to be 
revealed; the other completes it. In both instances, the mother of Jesus is prominent. It is at her 
bidding that Jesus first manifests his glory (2:3-5); she stands beneath the cross (1 9:25-27). The 
term woman may be a reference to Gen 3:15, 20, making Mary the second Eve, the mother of 
all the living. 34 Both Cana and Calvary take place at the time of the Jewish Passover (2:13; 
13:1), with all its rich symbolism of celebrating God's love and the sacrifice that accompanies it. 
And both are the culminating event of a week of preparation in which almost every day is 
outlined. 

In all four Gospels (Jn 3:29; cf. Mt 9:14, etc.), Jesus applies to himself the metaphor of 
bridegroom, a title reserved to God in relation to his people Israel. As the Word made flesh, he 
represents the whole of humanity before God, making him also the bride. Jesus is himself the 
marriage feast. Is this not also a snapshot of the Trinitarian mystery, the relationship of Father 
and Son, laid open to our gaze in the person of Jesus? If indeed the death of Jesus on Calvary 
is the revelation of the Father as the personification of transcendent love, unselfish love, love 
that gives itself even to death for the other, then the resurrection that follows can only be the 
revelation of the Son as the Beloved, the pearl of great price for which one is willing to give all 
that one possesses, with all the bridal imagery such a concept suggests. / am the resurrection 
and the life (11:25). The wedding symbolism found so often in Scripture is not, I would think, 
primarily the story of God's love for his people but the relationship of Father and Son in an 
eternal embrace of charity which is then only secondarily opened to us as sharers in the divine 
nature. 

I believe that what John is telling us throughout his Gospel, symbolically, in veiled 
language, yet concretely, visibly, tangibly, in human terms that we can understand, is that 
Jesus, the Word of God made flesh, is a revelation of the Trinity itself: Father, Son and Holy 
Spirit in an eternal embrace of love, a love that characterizes itself by laying down one's life for 
the other. The fullness of the mystery of Jesus and likewise the fullness of the mystery of the 
Trinity is made manifest at Calvary: Death ordained to Resurrection; sacrifice blossoming into 
life. 



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My Father and Your Father 

There was a wedding at Cana in Galilee and Jesus and his disciples had also been 
invited (2:1). In every respect, John's Gospel completes and perfects the initial meditations of 
the Synoptics. John's soteriology is no exception. It is not that John says things other than the 
earlier writers, although his collection of parables and images is uniquely his own. John too 
seeks to persuade and to draw out the implications of the Christian way of life as do Matthew, 
Mark and Luke. He too presents moral and practical considerations. What sets John on a plane 
above his peers is his ontology. He strikes to the root, seeing everything in light of The Word 
made flesh. It is because John sees so clearly that Jesus is God in human flesh that the 
consequences he draws out are so astounding. 

What the Synoptics refer to as the kingdom of God, John fixes more precisely as eternal 
life. Sharpening his vision even more, John tells us that eternal life means participating in the 
divine life of the Trinity (cf. 1 4:3; 1 7:3). It means being born from above, in God (3:3), becoming 
children of God (Un 3:1), brothers [and sisters] in Jesus (cf. 20:17), friends of the Son of God 
with whom he shares his secrets, making known to them everything he has learned from his 
Father (15:15; cf. 1:18). John, the disciple Jesus loved, leaning back on Jesus' breast at the 
Last Supper (1 3:25), duplicates the posture of the only Son, who is nearest the Father's heart of 
the Prologue (1:18). Both are expressions of intimate communion and abiding love. 

Jesus explicitly wants us to be with him, where he is, with the Father (cf. 14:3). He goes 
ahead to prepare a place for us (14:2). He tells us that he has loved us as much as the Father 
has loved him (1 7:23), assures us that the Father himself loves us because we have believed in 
him (16:27) and presses us to ask for anything in his name and the Father will grant it (cf. 
16:23). 

Our relationship to Jesus parallels that of Jesus with his Father. And because we are 
flesh of his flesh and bone of his bone (cf. Gn 2:23), as well as one Spirit with him, as we shall 
see, we share the same relationship to the Father enjoyed by Jesus himself. By becoming flesh 
and living among us, Jesus truly entered our human world, God's presence among us, within 
our human family, and does not merely communicate with us from above as formerly, although 
even that is above our expectation. So Jesus is able to say to Mary of Magdala on the day of 
resurrection, / am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God (20:1 7). 

So close is our bond with Jesus and through him with the Father that we are one being 
with him, nourished by the same divine life. / am the Vine, Jesus tells us, you are the branches 
(15:5). His is an abiding love, for all time, through all ages, open to every human person. 
Remain in my love, Jesus bids us. You will remain in my love if you keep my commandments 
just as I have kept my Father's commandments and remain in his love (15:10), love that 
expresses itself by laying down one's life for one's friends (cf. 15:2). 

It is at the Last Supper on the night before he died that John states for the first time that 
Jesus' life and death are an expression of love not only for his Father but for his disciples as 
well. It is a secret that has been kept for these last moments. 35 Jesus exemplifies his love by a 
parable in action: He assumes the dress and manner of a servant and stoops to wash the 
disciples' feet (13:4-5). Do you understand what I have done to you? he asks (13:13). His act 
was at once a prefiguration and interpretation of his impending death on the cross as well as an 
exemplification of the disciples' relationship to one another. Communication with one another 
after the example of Jesus consists in washing one another's feet (13:14) and in laying down 
one's life for one's friends (15:12). Only in this way, by allowing the life-giving death of Jesus to 



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flow through us, will we bear the fruit expected of us by the Father, fruit that will last (cf. 15:1 ); 
only in this way will we ourselves receive the glory Jesus has received from the Father (cf. 
17:21) and experience Trinitarian love; and only in this way will we be so completely one that 
the world will realize that Jesus was sent by the Father (17:22-23). 



The Holy Spirit, the Paraclete 

If we have left treatment of the Holy Spirit until the very end, it is not because of any lack 
of understanding of his importance. Here, as always, he is the silent, unseen member of the 
Trinity. Even so, he has been present all along, anticipated in the signs Jesus worked, 
implicated in most of the major discourses. He was the confirmation accorded John the Baptist 
(1 :34); he was introduced to Nicodemus (3:5-8) and to the Samaritan woman (4:23-24); he was 
the agent of belief at the Eucharistic discourse (6:63). We have left him to the end because he is 
the final gift, the cause, the effect, the fruit and the climax of Jesus' mission. As Jesus is the 
final Word, the ultimate revelation of the Father, so the Spirit is the final Gift, the summation of 
the entire message of salvation offered to us in Jesus. 

On the last and greatest day of the festival, Jesus stood there and cried out, lfany[one] 
is thirsty, let him come to me! Let [him] come and drink who believes in me! As Scripture says: 
From his breast shall flow fountains of living water. He was speaking of the Spirit which those 
who believed in him were to receive (7:37-38). John links the gift of the Spirit to the glorification 
of Jesus. For there was no Spirit as yet because Jesus had not yet been glorified (7:39). The 
moment for handing over the Spirit was as he died on the cross (19:30) and in his first post- 
resurrection appearance to the disciples when he breathed out his Spirit upon them (20:22). 

Jesus' promise of the Spirit is made on the last and greatest day of the festival. This was 
not, however, the feast of Passover which punctuates John's Gospel at other key moments. To 
proclaim the Spirit John chooses instead the feast of Tabernacles. Passover is a springtime 
feast; Tabernacles marks the harvest. Tabernacles is the most joyous of all the Jewish feasts. It 
is a feast of thanksgiving and celebrates God's presence among his people. It lasts for an entire 
week and for this week, too, preceding the announcement of the Spirit, time seems suspended. 
Jesus' movements throughout the seven days are noted, calling our attention to yet one more -- 
the final -- new creation, the crown of all creations, the gift of the Spirit, who will enable us to 
see God as he really is (cf. 1 Jn 3:2). 

The feast of Tabernacles commemorates the Mosaic water-miracle of Exodus (17:1 -7). 
Moses, listening to the cries of the people who were tormented by thirst, appealed to the Lord 
who commanded him to strike the rock in the desert. When he had done so, water gushed in 
abundance. The thirst, the striking of the desert rock, and the pouring out of the water, each 
symbolic of the Spirit, took place amid much grumbling and discontent. Is God with us, or not? 
(Ex 17:7) the people demanded in their unbelief. So too, Jesus' promise of fountains of living 
water flowing from his own breast is given against a background of controversy concerning his 
origin, the signs he worked, and his teachings. The people could not agree about him (7:43), we 
read. Rumors were circulating and the temple police were on the watch to arrest him (cf. 7:32). 
Only in the Spirit will our doubts be laid to rest; only in the Spirit will we be given to see and to 
understand and our thirst for truth and life be quenched. 

John's name for the Spirit is the Paraclete, the advocate, the counselor, the helper, the 
consoler. He is to stand in Jesus' place when Jesus in his visible existence is no longer with us. 
Unless I go, the Advocate will not come to you (16:7). The term"paraclete" means one who 



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takes the place of or speaks on behalf of another. In the Old Testament, this is exemplified by 
Joshua who was filled with Moses' spirit (Dt 34:9) or Elisha who inherited the spirit of Elijah (2 K 
2: 9,15). 36 In the religious realm of Hellenistic Greek, a paraclete is one who brings 
eschatological comfort to the afflicted and/or proclaims religious truth. 37 

John sees the Holy Spirit as another Advocate (14:16), as Jesus himself is our advocate 
with the Father (cf. 1 Jn 2:1 ). What is said of Jesus is said of the Spirit as well. Both are sent by 
the Father. Jesus comes in the Father's name (5:43); the Spirit comes in Jesus' name (14:26; 
1 5:26). Jesus is Truth and the Holy One of God (6:69; 14:6); the Paraclete is the Spirit of Truth 
and the Holy Spirit (14:17, 26). Jesus will remain with his disciples and make his dwelling with 
them (14:17; 15:5). So too the Paraclete will be in them (14:15) and they will know him as they 
know Jesus (14:9; 16:17). The Paraclete will remind them of what Jesus taught and will glorify 
him (14:26; 16:13-14) as Jesus speaks what the Father taught and glorifies him (8:28; 14:31; 
17:4). As the world did not know or accept Jesus (8:14, 19; 15:18-20), so it cannot see or know 
the Paraclete (14:1 7). 38 

The role of the Spirit in John is, primarily, to testify to the truth, a concept very different 
from that of Paul or Luke or the Synoptics. The latter see the Holy Spirit as a guiding force in 
Jesus' own life. Luke, in Acts, goes further and attributes that same life power to the Church. 
Paul's understanding of the Spirit is as the principle of unity within the living Body of Christ. 
Without denying any of these aspects, John -- again -- plumbs the depths, identifying him as the 
Spirit of Truth. 

The Holy Spirit stands as the witness to the truth, unveiling before our eyes the complete 
truth about Jesus, displaying the glory of the Word made flesh. He reminds us of all that Jesus 
said and did (14:26) and brings us to complete understanding (16:12), convicting the world of 
falsehood and reversing its verdict of condemnation (16:8-1 1 ). As the Paraclete, he empowers 
the Church to remember, to imitate and to profess the incamational, Trinitarian love of God for 
our world, perpetuating the presence of Jesus in our midst, consecrating us in the truth (16:17). 



Conclusion of Part IV 

The resplendent jewel of John's Gospel is its clear avowal that the Word was made 
flesh. In this single statement all truth is contained. Nothing more need be said nor can be said. 
And yet, eternity itself will not be long enough to fathom the depths of its meaning. 

Gazing upon Jesus through the eyes of John, we have seen God's presence throughout 
the centuries of salvation history. Every overture of God towards his people is summed up, 
finally fulfilled and effectively realized in Jesus. 

Following John's gaze more deeply into the mystery, we have discovered that the root of 
God's action among us is in the eternal embrace of God and his Word. Now we are gazing upon 
what no one has ever seen and yet is immediately accessible to those who believe. Jesus is the 
revelation of the Father. To know Jesus is to know God in the intimacy of his triune personhood. 

Led by John we have seen that Jesus reveals the Father as the source, the principle of 
life and unity within the Godhead, by referring everything to him. He reveals the Father again by 
his assumption of leadership in the laying down of his own life for others. He reveals himself as 
Son in his perfect obedience and surrender to the One he calls "Father." He reveals the Holy 
Spirit as the Witness to the Truth of blazing Charity uniting Father and Son. 



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We have been with John standing beneath the cross and in the upper room on the first 
day of the week to receive the fruit of Jesus' sacrifice, the Spirit: two stages in the mystery of 
passing over from death to new life, made one in that same Spirit. Here, we suggested, is the 
ultimate revelation of the triune God: death, symbolic of the Father's love; resurrection, bridal 
image of the eternal wedding feast; and the gift of the Spirit, salvation itself. 



Meanings 

What are we to say, then? What meanings may we glean for ourselves? I would suggest 
two. First, as John's Gospel shows us that the inner life of God is inherently relational, so are 
we, created in God's image, called to intimate communion with others. 39 The coming of Jesus 
among us has not only put us into contact with God but has transformed our horizontal 
relationships as well. 40 By reason of the Incarnation, every person shares in the humanity of 
Jesus, uniting each with the other through him. Every lack of unity, then, offends against the 
mystery of the Incarnation and betrays the image of the Trinity in us. And as we have seen in 
the example of Jesus, communion with others is purchased at the price of self-donation, 
washing another's feet, laying down one's life for one's friends. 

The second implication draws the same threads more deeply into material reality. Not 
only human life but all of creation has been touched by the mystery of the Incarnation. In Jesus 
all flesh has been sanctified. Bread and wine and water; the shifting sands of time and place 
and season; the coming to birth and the falling away again: all gathered into the unchanging 
truth of God's universal plan of salvation which reaches its apex in Jesus. Everything comes 
forth in him; all returns to God in him. 

Not only does creation discover it purpose, its source and its goal in Jesus but its mode 
of operation as well. All reality is governed by the dynamic ecstatic love of the Trinity. And the 
same principle of life springing from death is effective universally. In order to go forward, one 
must put the past behind. If the grain of wheat could think, no doubt it would shrink before the 
prospect of falling into the earth and dying (cf. 1 2:24). Nature at this stage of development is not 
capable of rising to self-awareness. But we are; and this places upon us the demand to freely 
choose to enter into the Paschal mystery if we would find life. This is the truth that sets us free 
(8:32) and that we see in Jesus who is "the Way, the Truth and the Life " (14:6). 



Summary: 

Who is God? And who is Jesus Christ? Who was he for his contemporaries, those who 
knew him in the flesh, and who is he for us now, some twenty centuries later? 

We do not have the advantage of proximity to the source with its resulting freshness of 
vision, its enthusiasm, its joy, its sense of wonder. Our sights have become blunted with time - 
but not necessarily so. Time has its own advantage; it offers the wisdom of experience, 
richness, depth and mellowed strength. It is only in time that the first fragile shoots - of thought, 
of nature, of personhood, of faith -- may come to full flower, as we have seen in the progressive 
understanding and development of theological expression among the four evangelists. 

In the preceding pages we have walked through the four Gospels seeking to understand 
each author's message, interlocking four times over with questions and thoughts of my own. 



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Four different faces of Jesus have emerged, four different stages of doctrinal development, four 
manifestations of our relationship to God, four dimensions of time. 

In "Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels" we discovered in Matthew the 
preponderance of a time of waiting, of preparation, come to its fulfillment, opening now to 
receive the new wine of the Gospel. Matthew takes us back into the tradition, grounding us in 
the past, weaving threads of unity even as he knows the old has passed away. In Matthew it is 
the face of the Father that appears, the Principle of unity, the Source of all that is. It is here, 
enveloped in the rhythmic heartbeat of God's unceasing love for his people, mysterious, hidden, 
yes, but all-embracing and enduring for all ages, past, present and to come. 

We considered Luke's vision as of a new beginning, guided and fashioned by the Holy 
Spirit. In many ways, Luke is a counter-point to Matthew. His Gospel is lightsome and joyful, 
expressive of the quick, darting movements of a young Church, newly born and eager to explore 
and to learn. Here the action of Holy Spirit looms large, calling forth a transformed world in 
which peace and justice may reign and telling us to "fear not" even though we continue to 
experience the birth-pangs of what is yet to come. 

Mark confronts us with the unvarnished truth of our human condition. He shows us to be 
as we are, stumbling, bumbling disciples groping our way in the darkness of incomprehension, 
one step forward, two back. It is among such as ourselves that Jesus, the Son of God, the light 
shining in the darkness, has pitched his tent, as John, of course, tells us, taking us to the other 
side of reality where we may view the terrain from within the Bosom of God himself. 

In all four Gospels it is Jesus we contemplate but the kaleidoscope of colors and images 
Is constantly changing. In Matthew he is the giver of the New Law, the master meek and humble 
of heart, whose yoke is easy, whose burden is light. In Luke he is holiness personified; in Mark, 
the perfect disciple; in John, God himself in human flesh. And in each Gospel, the 
understanding that God is triune gradually comes into focus before our wondering eyes. 

The apostolic age is past and revelation, is complete in Christ. 41 But this does not mean 
that there is nothing more to be learned or that each person, each successive age, will not 
understand the truth in his, her, its own way. God continues to converse with us, 42 to guide us 
into all truth. We have only just begun to scratch the surface of all that the coming of Jesus into 
our world means. 

In Jesus are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. In him all goodness, all 
beauty, all truth abide. He is the solution to every problem, the answer to every question, the 
goal and model of every human life. To him belong all times and seasons; he is the beginning 
and the end, the Alpha and the Omega. To him and to the One who sits on the throne be all 
glory forever. Amen 



"Snapshots of the Trinity: Parts I & II - Matthew and Luke" has been published in Dominican Monastic Search, 
Volume 21, 2002-03. 

1 Henry Wansborough, O.S.B., "St. Mark," New Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, ed. Reginald C. 
Fuller et. al. (New Jersey: Nelson, 1969), 954. 



66 



2 CM. Tuckett, "Mark," Oxford Bible Commentary, ed. John Barton and John Muddiman (Oxford: University 
Press, 2001), 888. 

3 Tuckett, 889. 

4 Edward J. Mally, S.J., "The Gospel According to Mark," The Jerome Biblical Commentary, ed. Raymond 
E. Brown et. al. (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1968), 24. 

5 Mally, 25. 

6 Henry Wansborough, O.S.B., "Son of God," New Catholic Commentary, 956. 

7 Mally, 24. 

8 Tuckett, 889. 

9 John L. McKenzie, "Son of Man," Dictionary of the Bible (New York: Macmillan, 1965), 830. 

10 Mally, 22. 

11 Translation taken from the The New Testament of the American Bible, translated from the original Greek 
by members of the Catholic Biblical Association of America (New York: Image Books, 1972). 

Donald Senior, "The Son of Man," Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible, ed. David Noel Freedman et. al. (Grand 
Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2000), 1242. 

13 Senior, 1242. 

14 Senior, 1242. 

15 Jean Galot, Who is Christ? A Theology of the Incarnation (Chicago: Franciscan Herald Press, 1981), 131. 

16 S. E. Johnson, "Son of Man," Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible, Volume 4, ed. George Arthur Uttrick et. al. 
(New York: Abingdon Press), 1962), 415. 

George W. E. Nicholsburg, "Son of Man," Anchor Bible Dictionary, Volume 6, ed. David Noel Freedman (New 
York: Doubleday, 1992), 144. 

18 R. E. Brown and F. J. Moloney, Gospel According to John, New Catholic Encyclopedia, 2 nd Edition, Volume 
7, ed. Berard L. Marthaler, O.F.M. Conv. et. al. (Washington, D.C.: Thomson Gale in conjunction with Catholic 
University of America, 2000), 908. 

19 Prosper Grech, O.S.A., "Tradition and Theology in Apostolic Times," New Catholic Commentary, 847. 

20 Grech, 851 



21 Bruce Vawter, CM., Johannine Theology, Jerome Biblical Commentary, 836. 

22 E. C Blackman, "Incarnation," Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible , Volume 3, 693. 



The Jerusalem Bible, ed. Alexander Jones et. al. (New York: Doubleday, 1965), page 147, note 1a. 



24 The unfortunate use of this term, the Jews, sounding so harsh to our more ecumenically sensitive ears, 
can be explained by the historical circumstances in which John wrote his Gospel, a time in which the 
separation of the Christian Church from the Jewish synagogues was most keenly and bitterly felt. John 
refers to the Jews in place of the more generic chief priests, scribes and pharisees used by the Synoptics, 
(cf. Brown & Moloney), 908. 

Marianne Meye Thompson, The Humanity of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 
1988), 34 ff. 

26 Thompson, 53 ff, 119. 

27 Cf. Galot, 100. 

28 Thompson, 111. 

29 Thompson, 105. 

30 Galot, 99. 

31 Jerusalem Bible, p. 169, note 10 g. 

32 E. M. Good, A Love in the Old Testament, Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible, Volume 2, 164. 
33 1 no longer have the reference from which this note was jotted down. 

34 Jerusalem Bible, p. 149, note 2 c. 

35 Jerusalem Bible, p. 175, note 13 b. 

36 Dom Ralph Russell, "St John," New Catholic Commentary, 1034. 

37 Robert Kysar, "Gospel of John," Anchor Bible Dictionary, Volume 3, 928. 

38 Russell, 1035. 

39 Catherine Mowry LaCugna and Michael Downey, "Trinitarian Spirituality," The New Dictionary of Catholic 
Spirituality, ed. Michael Downey (Collegeville: Liturgical Press/Michael Glazier, 1993), 971. 

40 Galot, 312. 

41 Cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church, (Washington, D.C.: United States Catholic Conference, 1997), # 65. 

42 Catholic Catechism, #66, 108, 131 & 133 and others, as well. 



67 



ROOTS AND BUDS INTERNATIONAL 

Sister Mary of God, O.P. 
North Guilford, CT. 



When Fr. Malachy O'Dwyer arrived at the Oakland General Chapter in 1989 he had 
just made a visitation of forty-two monasteries in Latin America. During one of the meetings 
of the Commission on the Nuns he remarked that all the nuns he had encountered were 
certain of their identity as Dominican nuns, whatever their circumstances. We discovered 
later that there is evidence that their sense of identity is extraordinary. Perhaps this is 
evidence also of our strong filial relationship with St. Dominic? 

After 800 years as we look back to St. Dominic and the nuns he gathered together, it 
could be of interest to recall again the origin of the International Commission of Dominican 
Nuns which began to bloom fairly recently. We know the nuns started to be 'international' at 
the prompting of St. Dominic when he asked for eight nuns from Prouilhe, France, to be 
foundresses of the monastery of San Sisto in Rome, Italy. According to Fr. Vicaire, they 
were to instruct the sisters from Rome who would be joining them in the "observances of the 
order," in which of course they had been instructed by St. Dominic himself. And we know 
that when it was not possible for Bl. Jordan to obtain nuns from Prouilhe to help found the 
Monastery of St. Agnes in Bologna, he received them from San Sisto. This also tells us that 
the nuns from the beginning were distinctly formed in the spirit of St. Dominic and his 
designs for the nuns of the Order. The first paragraph of our Fundamental Constitution 
rehearses this for us. 

Fifteen years ago the first members of the International Commission of Nuns were 
appointed by Fr. Damian Byrne, at the recommendation of the 1989 Oakland General 
Chapter of the Order. This paper will endeavor to show how this came to be, introduce us to 
a few of the earlier members and their work, and offer a challenge for the future. 



A CHAPTER COMMISSION ON THE NUNS 

For the first time in the history of the Order one of the eight Commissions for the 
General Chapter was DE MONIALIBUS, that is, On the Nuns. It had been thought that this 
Commission would be able to discuss the matters and petitions that had been sent to the 
Chapter and Master of the Order and make some recommendations regarding them. Fr. 
Damian Byrne suggested additional topics for discussion, such as, the specificity of 
Dominican nuns, common formation, and others. 

The Commission was composed of five provincials and four nuns. One of the 
provincials, Fr. Juan Gallego from Portugal, was its president. Three of the nuns were from 
the U.S. and one from Mexico (the president of the federation there). Fr. Malachy O'Dwyer, 
canon lawyer and procurator of the Order, was with us full time as peritus. This Chapter 
Commission realized from the beginning that since it was not representative, it was not 
competent to address the questions or petitions that had been sent. However, these and 
many other topics were discussed during our weeks together. Government in the 
monasteries and formation were often mentioned as areas of special concern. The gradual 
process of what evolved will be briefly summarized here. 



68 



From the first day the discussions pointed up the need for the nuns to interact 
internationally in order to be in accord with the Dominican spirit. There was an evident need 
for some form of continuing contact among the monasteries and also for consistent 
communication between the Order and the nuns for addressing their concerns. LCM 181, 
especially the second paragraph, was the inspiration and starting point for us in confirming 
the need we recognized and in seeking a way to fulfill it. This new text in our 1987 
Constitutions presupposes Dominican governmental procedures for the nuns beyond the 
local level. And no provision is made for the exchanges necessary for the on-going 
"compiling or changing" of our Constitutions mentioned there. In 1989, revision was not the 
primary focus. But it was important for the future that a way be found for the nuns to carry 
this out in accord with Dominican principles of government. There would have to be 
sufficient mutual understanding and exchange among the nuns preceding any decisions 
which would affect our legislation. We saw that international contact was essential for the 
nuns to comply with this text which was a new development in the history of the nuns' 
legislation. This new responsibility was to be, as the text says, "fostered among the nuns by 
an awareness of their genuine vocation and special role within the Order as well as by a 
solicitude for Dominican contemplative life promoted according to the conditions of each new 
age. 

The Chapter Commission on the Nuns recognized their responsibility to try to initiate 
some consistent way in which matters of serious concern could be addressed in the future. 
After days of discussion, a plan for an International Commission of Nuns was developed. 
Number one on the agenda for the work of the Commission, with the Promoter, would be 
fostering greater communication and mutual understanding among the monasteries. Also 
listed were the promotion of initial and on-going formation in the various geographical 
regions, and concern for monasteries in isolated areas. To better accomplish their work, 
some sort of bulletin, an organ of international communication, would be needed to promote 
a common understanding of LCM, to provide a forum for discussion, and to share general 
information about the monasteries and their needs. When our Commission's full report was 
completed it was given at a plenary session of the General Chapter. One of the 
recommendations proposed was the appointment of an International Commission of Nuns, 
and this was unanimously accepted by the capitulars. 



AN INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION OF NUNS 

Some months after the Oakland Chapter Fr. Damian Byrne appointed a promoter for 
nuns, and in November 1990, after consultation, he appointed four nuns to be members of 
an International Commission of Nuns. We were to be a working Commission to begin with; 
full representation would come later. The document DE MONIALIBUS from the Oakland 
Chapter was to be the basis of our first meeting. This meeting was held for a week in June 
1991 at the monastery in Orbey, France. The four members were: 

- Sr Elie Cails, a member of the Orbey community, in her second term as president of 
the federation in northern France; 

- Sr. Elizabeth Elive, an English-speaking African from the monastery in Bambui, 
Cameroon, novice mistress in her community, studying theology in Rome; 

- Sr. Ana Maria Primo, from the federal monastery at Torrent, Spain, in her third term 
as president of that federation, and also president of the interfederation union in 
Spain; 

- the fourth member was myself from the monastery at North Guilford, Ct, U.S.A. 



69 



The Commission members agreed to invite two nuns to participate as secretaries: Sr. 
Araceli Abos, also from Torrent, as Spanish-language secretary, and Sr. Mary Ann Dunn as 
English-language secretary. Fr. Viktor Hofstetter, former provincial of the Swiss province, 
was the Promoter for nuns who planned and attended our meetings and also served as 
translator. 

Our first endeavor was to get to know one another and to foster mutual 
understanding of Dominican contemplative life among ourselves. We went over together a 
report on the points which led to the recommendation for a Commission of Nuns made at the 
Oakland Chapter. All at the meeting promptly recognized the need as presented, and were 
very willing to go ahead, to continue sowing seeds for future work. 

We knew that to be effective we needed the acceptance and collaboration of all the 
nuns of the Order. We spent a great deal of time formulating a letter to be sent to the 
monasteries worldwide. We agreed that it was important to include certain elements: 

- explanation that the present Commission was not representative, but it was in 
continuity with developments over the past years, such as, the commissions 
participating in the recent revision of LCM, and the commission on the nuns at the 
Oakland Chapter; 

- importance of the collaboration of all the nuns for fostering mutual understanding, 
as recommended in LCM 181; 

- request for comments on the document DE MONIALIBUS, and on the idea of an 
International Commission of Nuns; 

- request for topics the monasteries would submit for future inter-communication, 
which would determine the work of the Commission. 

The letter, in English, French or Spanish, was sent by the members of the 
Commission and Fr. Hofstetter to all the monasteries of the Order according to language 
groups or regions. The responses to the letter would determine the work of the future. This 
first meeting of the International Commission was a very small beginning and we were able 
to accomplish only the first point on the Commission agenda, that is, promoting greater 
communication and mutual understanding among the monasteries. At our next meeting we 
would need to develop a method so that all the monasteries could participate in some way in 
the selection of a future Commission. 



DOMINICAN MONASTERIES WORLDWIDE RESPOND 

The second meeting of the Commission and secretaries, and Fr. Hofstetter, was held 
at Santa Sabina during the first week of March in 1992. We were welcomed warmly by the 
friars, and as it turned out, greeted by Pope John Paul II when he came to celebrate Mass 
on Ash Wednesday! 

The first few days were spent reading, discussing and reflecting on the responses 
from the monasteries to the Commission's letter from the first meeting. The reports were 
given by Sr. Ana Maria from all of Spain (85 monasteries), according to the three 
federations; Sr. Elie from the French-speaking monasteries in France and worldwide (32); 
Sr. Elizabeth from the Italian monasteries (30); myself from the English-speaking 
monasteries worldwide (25); and Fr. Viktor from the Spanish-speaking monasteries outside 



70 



of Spain, and also from the German-speaking monasteries (10), one Dutch, and the others. 

Most of the monasteries responded to the letter, about 200 monasteries of the 235 
listed. A large majority of them favored the document DE MONIALIBUS from the Oakland 
Chapter, and also the idea of an International Commission of Nuns and its work. Most found 
the document positive and encouraging. There was a small amount of opposition to the 
Commission and some cautions, caused for the most part by a misunderstanding of its 
purpose. Two overall points can be mentioned. Although the letter we sent did not have a 
question in regard to it, it was very clear from the responses that there was immense 
satisfaction with our new Constitutions on all sides. Secondly, most of the monasteries that 
favored the Commission mentioned that it should be representative. 

Almost every aspect of our life was mentioned by one monastery or another in the 
responses. Because the questions in the various languages were worded differently, it is 
difficult to distinguish what some called "areas of concern," from topics suggested for future 
exchange or study among the monasteries. So many needs and interests were mentioned: 
Aging communities of course, and scarcity of vocations, but also interest in Dominican 
government in general, the role of the chapter, formation, liturgy, study, prayer, common life, 
theology of enclosure, and the rest. All of the topics and comments are in the Minutes of the 
meeting, but would be too much to include here. After many sessions of listening to the 
reports on the responses, the Commission reflected together on them. We discussed what 
seemed to be a common search for equilibrium in the elements that make up our life - how 
to integrate them into the life as a unified whole. To balance study, lectio, and prayer with 
work can be a challenge today. Mention was made of a possible need for a dynamic or 
rhythm of life, perhaps on a weekly as well as a daily level. We realized that there is indeed 
a common search. 

In our session with Fr. Damian Byrne we were given an outline of his proposed letter 
to the nuns. He noted that they all seem to have a great certainty regarding their vocation 
and their place in the Order. His letter would address two major areas of concern. Regarding 
formation, it was becoming evident that a monastery cannot undertake it alone, and it must 
more and more become a common project in some way. Secondly, he mentioned a number 
of concerns in the area of government, notably the role of the monastery chapter, an area 
we knew many of the monasteries had also mentioned in their responses to our letter. 

We also had a session with Fr. Avagnina, vicar for the Italian monasteries. He had a 
meeting of the prioresses to discuss the letter we had sent from the meeting at Orbey. In 
general they favored the Commission and its work. Once again formation and government in 
the monasteries were mentioned as areas needing attention. The Commission visited the 
monastery in Nocera Inferiore, south of Rome, which had been founded in 1282. This was a 
fine community of twenty-four nuns who were very welcoming and interested in our work. 
This was encouraging. And it just happened that one of the nuns from Nocera was 
representative for Italy in the next Commission appointed. 



MOVING TOWARD REPRESENTATION FROM NINE REGIONS 

Finally during the last days of our meeting the discussions centered around the need, 
from the very nature of Dominican government and spirit, to develop some method of 
regional representation for the nuns worldwide. We agreed to present for the consideration 



71 



of the monasteries a tentative proposal which would deal with the matter of regional 
representation. 

The following regions were proposed: North America, Latin America, Mexico, Africa, 
Asia, Spain, France, Italy, the rest of Europe. A letter to all the monasteries was drafted 
containing the proposal of these nine regions and a method of representation. In discussing 
possible regions, it was necessary to take into consideration not only the number of 
monasteries, but also the various cultures and mentalities and languages. Even with the 
nine regions, some adjustments would be possible and needed. We knew some of the 
regions would take longer than others in finding a way to unite for representation. For 
example, the monasteries in Africa and Asia were founded by monasteries from various 
countries and would be dealing with three or four languages, and also Japanese and 
Chinese in Asia. However, the nine monasteries in Africa were already moving toward 
fostering unity, as were some of the others. Latin America and the region for the "rest of 
Europe" (those not in Spain, France or Italy) might take longer. Each region would have to 
define a process for consultation whether in groups of monasteries, federations, or in some 
other way in order to nominate one or more nuns. These names would then be submitted to 
the Master of the Order for the choice of nuns from each region. The responses to this letter 
with the proposed regions were due by October 1992. 

In July 1993 the Commission members sent a letter to all the monasteries thanking 
them for the responses, comments, and suggestions. In general there was no great 
opposition to proceeding in the proposed way. We outlined again the work of the 
Commission as recommended by the Oakland Chapter. We asked for nominations of nuns 
from each of the nine geographical regions. The Master of the Order could then appoint 
nuns from each of the regions to a new Commission. 



FINAL MEETING AT SANTA SABINA 

The third and final meeting of the first Commission was held at Santa Sabina in 
November 1993. The agenda included preparing a report to the monasteries and the Master 
of the Order on the work of the Commission thus far in relation to the recommendation of the 
Oakland Chapter. We were asked for any suggestions we might want to make to the Master 
of the Order and the new Commission. Fr. Timothy Radcliffe met with us for one of our 
sessions, and showed great interest in furthering the work of an International Commission of 
Nuns. 

The overall discussions at this final meeting of the Commission centered on the 
experiences and enrichments we had had, some difficulties encountered, and suggestions 
regarding the future Commission. A letter had been sent to the monasteries worldwide after 
each of our meetings to report on how we were endeavoring to carry out the numbers from 
the Oakland Chapter regarding the Commission of Nuns. The focus for the first Commission 
was on the initiating point, and we tried in small ways to promote communication and mutual 
understanding among the monasteries. In our three years the relations among some of the 
monasteries that were open to exchanges among them had greatly improved. Special efforts 
had been made in some areas to work together. There had been interchange of books, 
bulletins, information, liturgy, on formation, etc. We had a complete list of all our Dominican 
monasteries, and now this list was made according to the nine regions. 



72 



The richness of the responses to our letters was heartening, and we regretted we 
were not able to explore all the possibilities. We hoped this would be done in the future. The 
Commission had met with two Masters of the Order (Fr. Damian and Fr. Timothy), and 
presented the concerns of the nuns. The promoter for nuns, Fr. Viktor Hofstetter, had visited 
150 monasteries; this helped to increase contacts among some of them, and to strengthen 
some isolated monasteries in their Dominican identity. We recommended that the term for 
the next Commission be five years. We could also foresee that it would take time for some of 
the regions to have contact among themselves before a future Commission could function 
as representative. We were very grateful to Frs. Damian, Timothy, and Viktor for their great 
interest in the nuns and their faithful assistance, as well as to all the monasteries that 
collaborated so graciously with us in this small endeavor to break new ground. 



NEW REPRESENTATIVE COMMISSIONS 

The end of our term was the beginning of the Commission more fully represented! In 
May of 1994 Fr. Timothy Radcliffe sent a letter to all the monasteries affirming the purpose 
and status of the International Commission. He appointed eleven nuns from the various 
regions for a five year period, 1 994-1 999. They did not have a meeting until July 1996 so that 
all the regions would be ready to move ahead together. Their first meeting was at Prouilhe. 
As we know, Sr. Mary Thomas, from the Farmington Hills monastery, was appointed to this 
second Commission to represent our region, and also to the third. She kept us fully and well 
informed of all the meetings and events. Sr. Elizabeth from our first Commission had been 
reappointed to the second Commission as representative for the African region, and this 
helped for continuity. 

Sr. Joyce Rita (Karen/Nairobi, Kenya) was the representative for Africa on the third 
International Commission and reappointed to the current fourth one. She is also coordinator 
for the Union of African Monasteries formed last April which will continue to unite the region. 
Asia is now represented by Sr. Mary Emmanuelle (Bocaue, Philippines), and she is doing 
such a fine work in editing MONIALIBUS to send to all the regions for the monasteries. 

Mention should be made of the initial endeavors to get the first issue of 
MONIALIBUS off the ground. Sr. Claire-Marie, then prioress at Langeac in France (and now 
at Prouilhe), and some others on the Commission in 1999, were eager to get this organ of 
communication started. After sending 'Number 0' issue to the Commission members and the 
Master of the Order, they were encouraged to go ahead by Fr. Timothy. Soon issue #1 
appeared and was greatly appreciated by all the nuns. In that 2001 issue Sr. Claire 
interviewed Fr. Manuel Merten who had been appointed Promoter for nuns in 1999 while he 
was completing his second term as provincial in Germany. Sr. Claire continued as editor and 
printer until Sr. Emmanuelle took over in January 2004. 

As we go on, some of the connections we note are an interesting part of our history. 
Sr. Breda, from the monastery in Drogheda, Ireland, is a member of the current 
Commission. We remember that Sr. Rose from the same Drogheda monastery was involved 
in the initial paper work for revision of our Book of Constitutions even before there were LCM 
Commissions set up to revise it. She served on both LCM revision Commissions and also 
came to the U.S. to join us in translating the approved text into English. Another connection 
we see is that Sr. Jean-Therese, presently on the International Commission representing 
France, is a member of the same community at Orbey as Sr. Elie from the first International 



73 



Commission. We met her during our first meeting which was at that monastery. 

Perhaps it should be mentioned that this paper, with its focus on the beginning and 
the original purpose and agenda, cannot attempt to relate all the work and history of the 
International Commissions from 1996 to the present. 



PRESENT DIRECTION OF THE COMMISSION ? A CHALLENGE FOR THE FUTURE 

As we recall the purpose and work of the International Commission at its beginning, 
the challenge is to look to the interests of the present Commission. Earlier the monasteries 
had suggested many topics that could foster mutual understanding of our life among our 
monasteries if addressed together, such as, common life, lectio, study, prayer, work, and the 
search for ways of integrating the various elements of our life into a unified whole. Our 
specificity as Dominican nuns, a topic suggested by Fr. Damian Byrne, might still be an 
interesting topic to explore. He thought it could be study, serious reading. Whether any other 
contemplative communities have a chapter in their constitutions entitled "On Hearing, 
Studying, and Keeping the Word of God" might be interesting to consider, or so it seems to 
this writer. This could say something to us, consecrated, in a sense, to the ministry of the 
Word as Dominicans. LCM says the nuns of the Order, commissioned primarily for prayer, 
fulfill this as they "listen to the word, celebrate it and keep it in their hearts, and in this way 
proclaim the Gospel of God by the example of their life." While there is "but one and the 
same Spirit, one charity, one mercy," the others in the Order are "spreading abroad the word 
of God," and the nuns are "to seek, ponder and call upon" the Lord Jesus Christ so that the 
word may not return to God empty. So much we might consider. 

Recalling the purpose of the Commission and the points on the original agenda 
brings to the fore an important question: has not the Commission taken another direction? 
And what is the agenda for the future? Will the Commission strive to promote mutual 
understanding among the monasteries? Will they promote initial and on-going formation in 
the various geographical regions and consider other concerns of the nuns? Will they find 
ways to promote a common understanding of LCM, a forum for discussion, and "an 
awareness of our genuine vocation and role in the Order" and a "solicitude for Dominican 
contemplative life. .."(LCM 181)? There is a clear challenge for the nuns on the present 
Commission. 

Sr. Mary Lucy, from the Buffalo monastery, our current representative on the 
Commission, gave us a fine report of their first meeting last summer at the Torrent 
monastery in Spain. She mentioned that their next meeting would be in April 2006 at 
Prouilhe, along with all the International Commissions of the Order. She said the purpose 
was to increase the understanding of each branch for the vocation/work of the others. Sr. 
Mary Lucy's closing words in her report to us seem to be an apt way to end this paper. "May 
this coming 800 th anniversary see a deepening of our roots in the rich soil of the way of life 
our holy father Dominic has given us, the fruits of abundant vocations, and the rich harvest 
of the salvation of souls." 



T T T 



74 



According to the mind of our holy Father Dominic it is fitting that the 
nuns, like the friars, should have an enlightened participation in their 
own government. This pertains not only to the government of each 
monastery through elections and the votes of chapter and council, but 
also to the compiling or changing of their own Constitutions. 

This responsibility in regard to the Constitutions is to be fostered 
among the nuns by an awareness of their genuine vocation and special 
role with the Order as well as by a solicitude for Dominican 
contemplative life promoted according to the conditions of each age 
(LCM #181). 



75 



I 

I 



Jerusalem, Ifrolv ITOotber, 

llour song has been interrupteo 

l?ut vour voiee remains 

3n the stillness of love. 

Kememberin^ vour IBeooing Dav 
IBe surround vou 
3n whirling oanee 

To the tune of ifl-lirvam's orum. 

IDe kiss vour walls 

Q\no tie our hearts to vou. 

<OnlV one is the praver we make 

IDbich night ano oav guaros 

The embers of vour marriage. 

tOe prav for vour peaee... 

To know vour jov 

3s what we long for. 

2lno we journev to vour glorv 

Snowing we shall never rest 

<Until we rest in vou, 

jflOother of us all. 



Sister Mary of the Compassion, O.P. 
Farmington Hills, Ml 



76 



AUTHOR INDEX: 1980-2006 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES: 

1. There is an issue of DMS for every year except 1981,1988 and 2004. Two issues 
appeared in 1989, one of which contains the presentations of the 1988 Assembly. Thus, in the 
Index, 89/Spring refers to the issue containing these Assembly papers, plus including other 
articles as well, while 89/Fall designates the regular 1989 edition of DMS. 

2.The 1982 issue of DMS appeared as a supplement to the February, 1983 issue of 
Conference Communications. 

3. Articles that are translations by a nun are entered under the nun-translator, with a 
cross-reference from the original author to the translator. 

4. Authors are entered under their present (2006) name and monastery. If a nun has 
transfiliated, her previous monastery(s) follows the present one, in italic type and reverse order 
of chronology. In cases of a change of name, there is a cross-reference from the previous 
name. 

5. The entries are in alphabetical order by nun, followed by an alphabetical list of her 
articles, and their location, i.e., 94:102-108 means that the article will be found in the 1994 issue 
of DMS, on pages 102-108. 

6. Poetry is not included in this Index, but we hope to publish a Poetry Index in the future. 

Sister Susan Early, O.P. 
North Guilford, CT 



• •• 



• •• 



Agnes, Maria - Summit 

At the Wellspring of Trinitarian Communion: 

Footnote to Verbi Sponsa 00:96-1 00 
Florilegia on Saint Augustine's 

Letter 211 85:5-16 
The Gentle Art of Growing Old 01 :3-8 
Letter to Rene Descartes 94:102-108 
Love of Truth and the Truth of Love in 

Catherine of Siena's Mysticism 

89/Fall:96-103 
Our Contemplative Quest for Truth From a 

Dominican Perspective 96:23-27 
The Philosophical Spectrum of the 20th 

Century in the Light of the Monastic 

Paradigm 95:2-15 
Regular Chapter as a Workshop for Unity 



and Charity 90:25-32 
Toward a Monastic Spirituality of Work 

86:59-68 
Rule of St. Augustine For Today 87:27-36 
Workaholic Syndrome and Original Sin 

92:86-99 

Agnes, Mary - Buffalo 

Monastic Silence: a Mosaic 93:2-7 
The Place of Friendship in Our Monastery 
Chapters 90:53 

Agnes, Mary - Lufkin 

Star of Evangelization 93:35-37 
Friendship Between St. Catherine of Siena 
and St. Agnes of Montepulciano 06:30-32 



77 



Amata, Mary - Buffalo 

Homemaker 83:162 

Amata, Mary - Washington / Lufkin 

The Effects of Modern Economics on 

Our Way of Life 96:85-91 
The Fourth Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

83:31-34 
In the Beginning there was Consensus 93:9-12 
Monastic Peace in Selected Texts 91 :5-7 
Preparing to Converse With Modern Culture 

94:6-10 
Work and the Inroads of Activism 92:81-85 

Ancilla, Marie - Lourdes, France 

SEE 
Thomas, Mary, trans. - Buffalo 

Annunciation, Mary- Lufkin 

SEE 
Jean Marie - Langley / N. Guilford / Lufkin 

Anonymous 

Prayer as Relationship: God and the 
Self, a Developmental Study 83:67-86 

Anonymous - French Dominican Nuns 

Chez Les Dominicaines 80:44-45 
(Reports in Le Lien) 

Anonymous - Spanish Dominican Nun 

Our Contemplative Formation 80:43 

Anonymous - Summit 

Silence: a Monastic Tradition for Today 
83:143-150 

Ashley, OP, Benedict 

A Broad and Joyous Way 89/Spring:6-14 
Homily 89/Spring:3-5 

Assumption, Mary of the - W. Springfield 

Anthony, Monastic Friend (litany) 89/Spring:73 
Joseph 85:81-84 
Monastic Peace 91:19-21 

Augustine, Mary - Los Angeles 

Contemplative Life, Saint Thomas and 
Passive Entertainment 95:55-59 



Augustine, Mary - Syracuse 

Study as a Basis for Prayer 82:108-109 



B 



Barbara Estelle - Heme, Belgium 

The 'Prehistory' of the Perpetual Rosary Sisters 
As Seen in the Correspondence Between 
Frs. Saintourens and Ligiez (A.G.O.P.) and 
Other Manuscript Sources 02-03: 1 -1 2 

Barron, OP, William 

Prayer, Study, and the Life of Withdrawal 

92:51-72 
Understanding Enclosure in Contemporary 

Society 96:101-121 

Bedouelle, OP, Guy 

The Dominican Nuns: Historical 
Highlights 90:75-90 

Bernard, Mary - Summit 

SEE 
Denise Marie - Summit 

Burton-Christie, Douglas 

The Birth of the Word in the Soul 05:20-30 

Byrne, OP, Damian 

Informal Comments on the Constitutions 
and Life of the Nuns 84:5-14 



Cabrini, Maria - Lufkin 

St. Dominic's First Way of Prayer 82:88-90 

Camelot, OP, Thomas 

SEE 
Regina, Mary, trans. - W. Springfield 

Catharine, Mary - Summit 

At the Sign of the Pineapple: Monastic 

Hospitality 95:49-54 
My Eyes are Ever Towards the 

Lord 92:131-136 
Preachers of the Silent Word in a New 

Century 02-03:13-20 
The State of Thomism Today 98:103-104 



78 



Catherine, Mary - Elmira 

Blessed Jordan of Saxony 

on Lectio Divina 90:61-74 
The Fear of the Lord is Our Cross - 

Ancient Homily for Monastic Profession: 

an Interpretation 85:92-97 
The Following of Christ Through Religious 

Consecration as Dominican Nuns 84:34-47 



Confer, OP, Bernard 

Liturgy of Christian Burial for Mother Mary 
Aquinata of the Crucifixion, OP (Homily) 
89/Fall: 104-1 08 

Congar, OP, Yves 

Truth and the Future of Contemplatives 
80:46-49 



Catherine, Mary - Lancaster 

PaxChristi 91:32-34 

Christ, Mary of- Los Angeles 

Foundations of Prayer in the 

Old Testament 82:121-127 
Jerome and His Commentary 

on Psalm 83 (84) 97:80-82 
On Love of God and Love of Neighbor 

85:17-20 
Value and Implications of Papias 02-03:65-68 
Work and the Dominican Monastic 

Tradition 86:51-58 



Conway, OP, Pierre - trans. 

The First Constitutions of the Dominican 
Sisters of Montargis (1250) (Raymond 
Creytens, OP) 87:72-86 

Corbett, OP, John 

Holiness, Simplicity and Communio in 

Dominican Monastic Life 05:31-40 
Parting With Illusion: the Challenge 

of Monastic Formation in an Age 

of Immediacy 96:52-60 
Religious Observances and Transformation 

00:17-23 



Christi, Maria - North Guilford 

The Relationship of Study to Our Dominican 
Contemplative Life 80:26-30 

Christina, Maria - Lufkin 

The Seventh Way of St. Dominic's 
Prayer 84:151-154 

Claire - North Guilford 

Dominican Monastic Profession 

83:132-135 
The Observances of Silence and Enclosure 

00:36-46 

Clara Marie - Farmington H. / Newark 

A Fruit of Lectio at Office of Readings 
95:39-40 

Clare Patrick, Mary, trans. - North Guilford 

Beatification of Margaret Ebner, O.P. 
80:20-21 

Compaing, Rene, Rev. 

SEE 
Regina, Mary, trans. - W. Springfield 



Corrigan, Bishop Michael - Newark 

Letter to Louis Mary Cardinal Caverot, 
Archbishop of Lyons (1880) 80:52 

Creytens, OP, Raymond 

SEE 
Conway, OP, Pierre trans. 

Cross, Maria of the, trans. - Summit 

Praying with the Psalms (Jean-Luc 

Vesco, OP) 01:32-63 
Study and Contemplative Prayer (Fabio 

Giardini, OP) 91:43-46 
Words From Mount Athos (LeLoup) 

93:15-23; 94:79-85; 95:85-92; 97:94-103 

Cross, Mary of the - Bocaue, Philippines 

Dominican Nuns of Paris 86:96-102 

Jonah and Jonah 86:110-115 

To Know and to Love 89/Fall:79-81 

Cynthia Mary - Summit 

This Pearl of Great Price, Our Catherine 
89/Fall:90-95 



79 



Daria - North Guilford 

Faith, Theology and Contemplation 
98:97-100 



David Marie - Elmira 

Is Perfection Possible? 



02-03:53-56 



Doyle, OP, Thomas 

Dominican Government Today 

Parti: 84:82-92; 

Part II: 93-103 
Dominican Government Today in the Light 

of Our Legislative Heritage and the 

Church's General Law 84:104-116 



Demkovitch, OP, Michael 

Contemporary Views on Morality 
and Its Effects on Society and 
the Contemplative Nun 96:45-51 

Philosophical Influences Shaping Life 
Today 96:29-36 

Denise Marie - Summit 

The Challenge of Self- Sacrificing Love 

89/Fall:32-39 
Common Life in the Dominican Tradition: An 

Enduring Observance in the Unity of the 

Triune God 00:62-71 
The Role of Solitude in Dominican 

Contemplative Life 85:47-52 

DiNoia, OP, Augustine 

Christian and Modern Ideas of Freedom: 

Contrast and Convergence 89/Spring:32-41 
A Suitable Place (Homily) 85:73-76 
The Mystery of Divine Communion and the 
Dominican Monastic Life 00:3-16 



Elizabeth, Mary - Newark 

An Introduction to the Study of 

Icons 83:163-167 
Poetry: Speech Framed for Contemplation 

87:38-54 
A Short Biography of Gerard Manley 

Hopkins, Poet 86:103-109 

Elizabeth of the Trinity - Buffalo 

A Tribute to Sr. Mary Raphael 93:58-61 

Emily, Mary - Lufkin 

SEE 
Regina, Mary - Langley / Farmington H. I 
Lufkin 

Emmanuel, Mary - Buffalo 

The Proof is in the Pudding: St. Bernard 
of Clairvaux, Peter Abelard, and 
St. Thomas Aquinas 98:101-102 



Dolores, Mary - North Guilford 

Covenant 84:134-138 
In Praise of the God of Love: Blessed 
Elizabeth of the Trinity 95:28-34 

Dominic Marie - Buffalo 

Look to the Rock From Which You Were 

Hewn 83:137-139 
Prayer and Spiritual Growth in Dominican 

Life 82:83-84 



Emmanuel, Mary- W. Springfield 

Consecrated to God 89/Fall:1 1-14 

Enclosure 89/Fall:66-67 

A Never Fading Vision 92:137-140 

Eucharist, Mary of the - W. Springfield 

Do Not Be Afraid: Facing the Millennium with 
Trust 99:44-47 



Dominic Marie - Farmington H. 

Lectio With a Fresco: Noli Me Tangere 
-FraAngelico 99:62-72 

Dominic, Mary - Newark 

SEE 
Jesus, Mary of- Farmington H. / Newark 



80 



Frances Clare - Bronx 

The Impact of Modern Culture 
on Monasticism 83:151-158 



Gracemary - Buffalo 

Forma Dei 89/Fall:82-89 
The Strong City 91:38-40 



Francis, Mary- Farmington H. 

Approaches to Our Charism 

I. Structures 80:1-6 

II. Study: A Heritage Re-gained 80:32-38 
The Content of Anxiety and the Dark 

Side of Prayer 84:129-133 
How Lectio in the Monastic Way 

is Still Relevant Today 80:39-40 
The Naked Spirit in Eckhart's 

"Counsels on Discernment" 83:44-54 
Preambles to Government 86:83-94 
Such a Woman. ..Such a Saint! 80:22-23 



Giardini, OP, Fabio 

SEE 
Cross, Maria of the, trans. - Summit 

Giuseppina, Mary - Marino, Italy 

Sign of Hope 87:22-24 

God, Mary of- North Guilford 

Basic Constitution of the Nuns 84:22-27 

and 84:28-33 
Catherine, Woman of Prayer 82:128-139 
Dominican Common Prayer-Nuns 83:87-89 
Roots and Buds International 06:68-75 
St. Dominic and Dominican Origins and 

Charism 86:18-27 
Study in Our Dominican Monastic Life 

80:41-42 

Goergen, OP, Donald 

The Gift of Sadness in the Contemplative Life 

05:79-90 
A Life Harmoniously Ordered to the Continual 

Remembrance of God 05:3-1 

Grace, Mary - Bronx / Washington 

Grandsons of St. Dominic 94:68-73 
Towards Understanding Contemporary 
Art 95:67-80 



H 



Hamer, OP, Jean Jerome 

SEE 
Ruth Ann Mary, trans. - Summit 



Hilkert, OP, Mary Catherine 

Understanding the Contemporary Theology 
of the Human Person 96:10-20 

Holy Cross, Mary of the, trans. - Buffalo 

First Glimpse of Mother Maria Teresa (sic) 

87:61-71 
Mother Teresa Maria Ortego of 

Olmedo, Chapter 2 89/Spring:76-85 
This Hidden Life 85:90-91 
Witnesses from the Desert 91 :63-70 

Holy Eucharist, Maria of- W.Springfield 

Spiritual Initiation and Ongoing 
Development 86:69-74 

Hyacinth, Mary - Lufkin 

The Fifth Way of St. Dominic's 
Prayer 83:35-38 



I 



Immaculate Conception , Mary of the - W. Sp. 

Communio in the Monastic Life of 

Paulinus of Nola 90:49-52 
Jesus, Model and Teacher of Prayer 

in the Gospels 83:11-13 

Incarnation, Marie of the - N. Guil. / Newark 

A Distinctive Identity: Dominican 

Contemplative Nuns 83:125-128 
The Prayer of Intercession 83:61-66 



81 



Jean Marie - Langley / North Guilford 

Aquinas's Theology of Trinitarian Mission 

and the Dialogue of Catherine of 

Siena 95:60-66 
Community as the Image of the Trinity 

90:5-10 
Comparative Study on Regular Observance 

Old and New Constitutions 

85:24-38 
Dominic and the Early Monastic Tradition 

06:8-13 
Dominican Nuns as Followers of Christ: 

Common Life and Evangelical Counsels 

86:29-46 
Dominican Vision for the Future: 

a Reflection 92:74-80 
Freedom for God - Freedom in Communion 

98:15-29 
Freedom Through the Community as 

Found in the Tradition of Dominican 

Government 89/Spring:64-70 
Observance in the Dominican 

Tradition and in the Constitutions 

of the Nuns 89/Fall:2-10 
Peace and Consensus 91:9-18 
Prayer as Relationship: God and the Self 

83:67-86 
Scripture, Theology and the Nature 

of Doctrine in Aquinas and in the 

Thought of Post-liberal Theologian 

George Lindbeck 94:93-101 

Jeremiah, Mary - Lufkin 

Community Discernment in 

Choosing Those in Authority 

90:33-38 
Grateful Memories of an Enduring 

Presence 83:123-124 
"In the Name of.. .Sweet Mary" 87:7-1 3 
The Ninth Way of St. Dominic's 

Prayer 84:158-164 
Understanding the Contemporary 

Theology of the Human Person 96:5-9 



Jesus, Mary of- Bronx 

Study in the Dominican Tradition 

85:39-46 
Study in the Life of the Dominican 

Nun 94:63-67 
Study is a Prayer to Truth: Jesus, pure Truth 

teach us the Truth 00:72-86 

Jesus Crucified, Mary of- Buffalo 

Lead Me in Thy Truth 89/Fall:29-31 
The Top Priority 93:25-26 



Jesus, Mary of- Farmington H. / Newark 

An Introduction to the Study of Icons 
83:163-167 

Joanne - North Guilford 

Silence in the Monastic Tradition 
89/Fall:51-53 

John, Mary - Farmington H. 

Sainte Baume and Devotion to St. Mary 
Magdalen in the Dominican Order 
83:159-161 

St. Catherine and Holy Discretion 99:73-83 

John, Mary - North Guilford 

To Become a Hesychast 82:114-118 

Joseph, Mary - Los Angeles 

Be What You Are, Contemplatives 

84:187-189 
Truth 85:53-55 

Joseph, Mary - Marbury 
Listen to the Spirit 98:30-33 

Joseph, Mary - N. Guilford / Newark 

Peace 91:2-3 

Jude Marie Thaddeus - Elmira 

A Psalm of Introduction to the Psalms 
02-03:57-58 

Judith Miryam - Summit 

Culture Shock: Reflections on the Dynamics 
of Inculturation and Formation 94:11-17 



82 



Lauren Marie - North Guilford 

Cenobitic Beginnings: the Pachomian 
Monastic Experience 80:10-17 

Lee - North Guilford / Bronx 

At the Heart of the "Holy Preaching" 

Toward a Theology of Dominican 

Monastic Enclosure: History, 

Principles, Praxis 94:41-54 
Contemporary Issues in Scripture: 

Some Helpful Reading 97:34-51 
A Parable of the Word 92:37 
A Radiant Center of Charity - At the 

Heart of the Holy Preaching 96:122-137 

LeLoup, OP, Jean-Yves 

SEE 
Cross, Maria of the, trans.- Summit 

Louis Bertrand, Mary, trans. - W. Springfield 

Origin of Dominican Coat of Arms 83: 1 36 
trans. From Histoire des Dominicains de 
la Province de France by Chapotin 

Lucy of the Divine Word, Mary - Buffalo 

Towards a Greater Democracy: a Look at 
the Shift in the Role of Authority Between 
Pachomius and Augustine 90:19-23 



M 



McCreesh, OP, Thomas 

The Meaning of Freedom in Scripture 
89/Spring: 15-22 

McDonough, OP, Elizabeth 

Impressions and Advice: "What's It 
All About, Anyway?" 05:91-96 

Magdalen Mary - Langley / Farmington H. 

Dominican Roots in the Monastic 

Tradition 86:11-17 
Work: Its Meaning and Value for 

Contemporary Dominican 

Monastic Life 92:27-37 



Magdalen, Mary - Lufkin 

The Sixth Way of St. Dominic's 
Prayer 83:39-43 

Magdalen (Braun), Mary - Farm. H. / Newark 

Centenary for Dominican Nuns 

In the United States 80:50-51 
The Dominican Vision - Roots of Our 

Monastic Life... Integration of Its 

Elements 92:2-10 
The Gospel: Supreme Pattern of 

Dominican Monastic Life 86:5-10 
Revisiting Familiar Territory: Tuning Our 

Minds to Our Voices 06:40-44 
The Value and Practice of Lectio 

Divina 84:68-81 

Margaret, Mary - Buffalo 

A Trilogy 85:61-66 

Vacate et Videte 89/Fall:58-64 

When We Cry Abba, Father! 90:46-48 

Margaret, Mary - Elmira 

Reflections on a Directed Retreat 82:85 
Saint Dominic and His Love for the 
Liturgy 83:90-92 

Margaret, Mary- Farmington H. 

SEE 
Margaret Emmanuella, Mary- Farmington H. 

Margaret (Perry), Mary - Farmington H. / 
Newark 

Thomism Today 95:93-95 Surname? 

Margaret Benedicta, Mary - Elmira 

King David's Psalm of Psalms: Psalm 62(63) 
01:64-71 

Margaret Emmanuella Mary - Farmington H. 

Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: 

Parts I and II Matthew & Luke 02-03:29-48 
Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: 

Parts III and IV Mark & John 06:49-67 
St. Dominic and Women: a Dialog 

With the Modern World 98:69-80 
Theological Study in Dominican 

Contemplative Life 94:55-62 
Toward a Spirituality of Poverty 89/Fall:70-78 



83 



Marian Dominic - Lancaster 

Called to Peace 91:22-24 

Marie Tersidis - Lufkin 

Dominican Monastic Values: A Personal 
Witness 05:104-110 

Marina -Summit 

Mid-life Novitiate: My Occasion 
For Profound Human Growth 98:81-88 

Martin, Mary -Summit 

Lectio and Eruditio in the Rule of San Sisto 

90:57-60 
The Prayer of Saint Dominic and of the 

Early Dominicans 83:20-30 
The Prayer of Saint Dominic and of the 

Early Dominicans, Part II 84:119-127 
The Scriptural Meaning of Freedom as 

Reflected in Our Constitutions and Other 

Related Documents 89/Spring:23-31 

Martin, Mary - Trinidad 

Lectio Divina 89/Fall:16-18 

Mary Ann - North Guilford 

Freedom for God in the Monastic 
Writings of John Cassian 89/Spring:43-53 

Mercy, Mary of- Farmington H. 

The Reality of the Lived Experience: 
Areas to be Explored 92:11-19 

Michael Marie - Lancaster 

The Prayer of the Rosary 82:119-120 



Miriam - Elmira 

The Inner Mountain 



83:14-19 



Myriam - Zelem, Belgium 

Father Vicaire on the Contemplative Life 
(report of Father Vicaire's Conferences 
prepared by Sr. Myriam) 85:77-80 



N 



Nichols, OP, Aidan 

SEE 
Thomas Mary - North Guilford 



Miriam - Lufkin 

A Reflection on the Annunciation 94:77-78 



O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 

The Basic Constitution of the Order 

84:15-21 
Dominican Monastic Observance as 

Christological and Sacramental in Character 

00:24-29 
Dominican Monastic Observance in the 

Contemporary Context 00:30-35 
Freedom Through the Community as Found 

in the Monastic Tradition 89/Spring:54-63 
Heaven and Earth Embrace: The Celebration of 

the Liturgy in Dominican Contemplative Life 

05:11-19 

O'Dwyer, OP, Malachy 

Pursuing Communion in Government - 
Role of Community Chapter 92:38-50 

Origen 

SEE 
Regina, Mary, trans. - W.Springfield 

Ortego, Teresa Maria - Olmedo 

SEE 
Holy Cross, Mary, trans. - Buffalo 



Moore, Hallie, M.D. 

The Contributions of Modern Psychology and 
their Interface With the Spiritual Dimension 
96:67-82 

Murray, OP, Paul 

Dominicans and Happiness 05:65-78 
"Eat the Book": Study in the Lives of Dominican 
Preachers and Contemplatives 05:41-64 



Pacelli, Eugenio Cardinal (Pope Pius XII) 

SEE 
Trinity, Mary of the, trans. - Menlo 

Pascale-Dominique - Lourdes 
Love of God and Love of Neighbor 
in the Writings of St. Augustine 97:9-1 5 



84 



Perkins, OP, Ignatius 

Reclaiming the Dominican Vision for the 
21st Century: a Challenge for Aging 
Contemplative Communities 92:20-26 

Pinckaers, OP, Servais 

SEE 
Thomas, Mary, trans. - Buffalo 

Precious Blood, Mary of the - Buffalo 

Augustinian Themes in Our Basic 

Constitutions 85:21-23 
The Basis of Lonergan's Theological 

Method 94:86-88 
Contemplative Religious Women: 

the American Situation Twenty- Five 

Years Later 92:144-150 
Empty Vessels: An Allegory 84:149-150 
The "O Lumen" in Portraiture 83:93-94 
Some Reflections on the Metaphysical 

Basis of Communio According to Saint 

Thomas Aquinas 90:2-4 

Pure Heart, Mary of the - West Springfield 

Dear Friend, St. Gregory (litany) 89/Spring:71- 
72 



Ramsey, OP, Boniface 

Aspects of Religious Consecration 

84:48-52 
The Effects of Modern Economics On 

Our Way of Life 96:93-98 

Regina, Mary - Langley / Farmington H. / 
Lufkin 

Adoration: St. Dominic's Humble Prayer 

06:3-7 
Catherine of Siena: Her Fellowship of Friends 

06:20-29 
Dominican Conscience 97:17-19 
Dominican Missionary Preachers to the 

New World 05:116-124 
Elizabeth of the Trinity and the 

Interior Castle 85:98-111 
Ezekiel and the Dominicans 93:29-34 
John the Baptist and the Dominican Nuns 

98:45-48 
Mary and the Virtue of Trust 84:190-192 



Nehemiah; a Model Leader 90:1 1-14 
Of Mary, Martha, Abraham and Us 

89/Fall:19-23 
Peace and Restlessness in St. 

Catherine of Siena 91 :25-30 
Pilgrim Virgin, Pilgrim Church 87:2-6 
The Word of God in LCM - Logos 

and Rhema 95:35-37 
The Work of the Master's Hand: 

Letters and Vision of Damian Byrne, OP 

92:120-124 
Yves Congar: Theologian and 

Contemplative 94:89-92 

Regina, Mary - Lufkin 

The Dust Artist: a Meditation on 

John 8:1-16 97:53-58 
Love's Beauty, Massive Majesty and 

the Superstar 97:83-91 
Modern Psychology and Contemplative Life 

94:22-30 
The "Pleiades" and the "God of War" in a 

Dominican Sky 05:111-115 
Time and the Timeless Doctor 99:38-43 
Star Dust 93:51-54 

Regina, Mary, trans. - W. Springfield 

Hyacinth-Marie Cormier, OP 

(extracts from 3 French books) 83:169-178 
Five Psalms (from the French of Rene 

Compaing) 02-03:59-64 
Homily on Magdalen by Origen 00:111-117 
Margaret Ebner (from the French: 

Annee Dominicaine) 82: 1 42-1 48 
Reading and Prayer Thos. Camelot, OP 

85:112-120 
The Venerable Sister Blanche of Prouihle 

(from the French of J.J. Berthier, OP) 

80:18-19 

Resurrection, Maria Rose of the - Summit 

A Brief Reflection on the "Adoro Te Devote" 
(1) 83:95-97? 

Rosaria, Marie - Philippines 

Manual Labor - a Monastic Observance 

for Dominican Nuns 91:51-62 
Vocation of the Dominican Contemplative 
Nuns 80:7-9 



85 



Rosario, Mary (Oropeza) - Los Angeles 

Applied Research on Modern Atheism 
in Western Society 89/Spring:86-90 

Rosario, Maria - Lufkin 

The Eighth Way of St. Dominic's 
Prayer 84:155-157 

Rose, Maria - Summit 

SEE 
Agnes, Maria - Summit 

Rose, Mary - Farmington H. 

A Trinitarian Ministry: The "Mandatum" 

02-03:50-52 
Mandatum 2001: The Need for Beauty 

01:1-2 

Rose Dominic, Mary -Summit 

The Charism of St. Dominic and of the 

Dominican Order: a Spiritual Reflection 

83:101-105 
God's Authorship of Creation: His Providence 

Over Creation & Over Man 93:39-49 
The Gospels 94:74-76 
The Ideal of a Dominican Contemplative 

Nun 84:139-147 
Jesus Is Lord: A Jubilee Reflection 99:58-61 
The Mystery of a Religious Vocation 05:98-103 
Philosophy: Its Influence on Our Culture 

and on Our Contemplative Life 

95:16-21 
The Question of Enclosure Today: a 

Response 94:31-40 
Some Spiritual Aspects of Study 91 :47-49 

Roseanne, Mary - Bronx / Lufkin 

Contemplation in Our Modern Times 
83:55-58 

Ruth Ann Mary, trans. - Summit 

Address to the Presidents of the 
Federation of Spanish Dominican 
Nuns (Hamer) 87:56-60 

Ruth Bernard - North Guilford 

The Current Moral Climate in the 
U.S.A. and Its Impact on 
Monastic Life 96:39-43 



Rzeczkowski, OP, Matthew trans. 

Little Flowers of the Dominican 
Sisters (Michal Sieykowski, OP ) 
06:33-38 



Sacre Coeur, Marie Damien du - Brazil 

The Sanctity of Curupira 85:68-69 

Sacred Heart, Mary of the - Farmington H. / 
Elmira I Lufkin 

An Expression of Our Identity in Our 
Revised Constitutions 83:129-131 
Works of Penance 86:47-50 

Sacred Heart, Mary of the - Marbury 

Do You Not Know You Are a Temple 

of God? 97:3-8 
See What Love the Father Has! 99:28-34 
"Sub Tuum Praesidium" 05:125-140 
Until Jesus Be Formed in You: 

A Marian Short Story 98:91 -96 

Sacred Heart, Mary of the - Menlo Park 

God Who Reveals Himself 92:141-143 
In Journeying Often 98:10-14 
Retreat Experiences 82:110-113 

Sacred Heart, Mary of the - W Springfield 

Come to the Father: A Kaleidoscope-View of 
the Father in the New Testament 99:3-27 
Journey to Intimacy 92:125-130 
A Rainbow of Reflections on the Holy Name 
of Jesus 82:98-107 

Savior, Mary of the - Farmington H. 

Contemplative Life for Women in the 

Church Today: One Nun's Opinion 98:2-6 
An Exploration of Fr. George Tavard's 

Trina Deitas 99:48-57 
In Love with the Universe: a Brief 

Introduction to the Work of Bernard 

Lonergan 97:59-78 
Praying Before a Picture 98:34-44 
A Vespers Homily for the First Sunday of 

Advent (A) 99:35-37 



86 



Sieykowski, OP, Michal 

SEE 
Rzeczkowski, OP, Matthew trans. 

Stephen, Mary- Elmira 

Historical Background of St. Dominic's 
Life and of the Foundation of the Order; 
and Summary of Subsequent History 
83:106-122 



Listening to the Word of God Servais 
Pinckaers, OP, - Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. 
(Buffalo) 06:45-48 
Putting on the Mind of Christ [Play] 01 :28-31 
Refectory Reading and Prayer 82:140-141 
Reflections on the Spirit and Structure 
of Dominican Government 86:75-81 
Silence and Community 89/Fall:54-57 
The World as We Know It 94:2-5 



Susan Early- North Guilford 

Individualism 95:42-48 
Rule of St. Augustine: a Response 
to the Culture of Narcissism 97:20-27 

Susan Heinemann - North Guilford 

Community and Solitude 90:39-44 
Formed by the Word, Taught by the Spirit, 

We Dare to Study 92:100-110 
Knowing and Enjoying God: Cassian's View 

of Monastic Progress 89/Fall:41-49 



Teresa Maria Ortego - Olmedo 

SEE 
Holy Cross, Mary of the, trans. - Buffalo 

Theresa, Mary - Buffalo 

Is Theological Study Important For 
Dominican Contemplatives? 95:23-27 

Therese Claire - Bambui, Cameroon 

Our Monastic Life 89/Spring:74-75 

Thomas, Mary - Buffalo 

Authority and Communio in Philemon 
90:15-17 

Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 
of the Order of Preachers 
Part II 99:85-125,- Part III 00:118-143 
(Author: S. Marie Ancilla - Lourdes, 
trans.: Sr. Mary Thomas - Buffalo) 

Communio and Missio 85:56-59 

Fundamental Constitution of the Nuns of the 
Order of Preachers: a Commentary 
author: S. Marie Ancilla - Lourdes, 
trans.: Sr. Mary Thomas - Buffalo) 98:49-68 

Imago's Journey: A One-Act Play 
95:96-104 



Thomas, Mary - Lufkin 

The River That Gives Joy to God's City: 
Scriptural Reflections on Dominican 
Contemplative Life and Prayer 02-03:21-28 

St. Gregory of Nyssa and the Four Dominican 
Observances 01:9-17 

Thomas Mary - North Guilford 

Beauty, Contemplation and the Virgin Mary 

00:92-95 
Christian Anthropology and Dominican 

Monastic Life 94:18-21 
Discovering Aquinas by Aidan Nichols, OP 

[Book-review essay] 02-03:69-77 

Trinity, Mary of the - Farmington H. 

Dominican Vocation - In a Word (Homily) 

98:7-9 
Praying with a Picture: Coronation of the Virgin 

00:89-91 
A Reflection on Memory and Contemplation 

00:101-103 
Theological Study in the Life of Dominican 

Contemplative Nuns 92:111-119 

Trinity, Mary of the, trans. - Lufkin 

Curupira's Rosary 85:70-71 

Trinity, Mary of the, trans. - Menlo 

Saint Dominic (talk by Cardinal 
Pacelli in 1935) 84:168-185 



87 



w 



Vesco, OP, Jean-Luc 

SEE 
Cross, S. Maria of- Summit 

Vicaire, OP, H.-M. 

SEE 
Myriam - Zelem, Belgium 

Victor Marie - Lufkin 

St. Dominic's Second Way of Prayer 
82:91-93 



Walsh, OP, Liam 

Dominican Study and the Experience 
of God 84:53-67 

Whitt, OP, Reginald 

Verbi Sponsa and Dominican Monastic Life 
00:47-61 

William, Mary - Lufkin 

The Eternal Now of the Liturgy 85:85-89 
St. Dominic's Third Way of Prayer 82:94-97 



Vincent, Mary - Farmington H. 

Dominic: You Could Have Turned Back 

06:14-18 
Ephesians: Blessed in Christ with the 

Fullness of God 05:141-156 
The Exchange 02-03:99 
The Father in Paul's Letter to the Romans 

00:104-110 
Go into My Vineyard: a Homily 97:31-33 
Hebrews: Achievement, Assurance, Abundance 

01:18-26 
The Pros and Cons of Psychology in our 

Dominican Contemplative Life 96:63-66 
Theology and Contemplation in the 

Dominican Tradition 95:81-84 
The Yearning in Gideon's Heart 

89/Fall:24-28 

Violet Ann - Syracuse 

The Tale of the Wood 83:179-182 

Virginia Mary - Summit 

Mary in the Incarnation and the Signs of 
Times 87:15-21 



88 



TOPIC INDEX: 1980-2006 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES 

1 . There is an issue of DMS for every year except 1 981 and 2004. Two issues appeared in 
1 989, one of which contains the presentations of the 1 988 Assembly. Thus, in the Index, 89/Spring 
refers to the issue containing these Assembly papers, plus other articles as well, while 89/Fall 
designates the regular 1989 edition of DMS. 

2. The 1982 issue of DMS appeared as a supplement to the February, 1983 issue of 
Conference Communications. 

3. Each article entry is followed by its location, i.e., 94:102-108 means that the article will be 
found in the 1994 issue of DMS, on pages 102-108. 

4. Authors are entered under their present (2006) name and monastery. (Cross references to 
previous religious names and monasteries are found in the 2006 Author Index.) Articles that are 
translations are credited with the names of both the author and the translator. 

5. Poetry is not included in this Index, but we hope to publish a Poetry Index in the future. 

Sister Susan Early, O.P. 
North Guilford, CT 



• •• 



• •• 



Abelard, Peter, 1079-1142 

The Proof is in the Pudding: St. Bernard of 
Clairvaux, Peter Abelard, and St. Thomas 
Aquinas 98:101-102 

- Sr. Mary Emmanuel, (Buffalo) 

Aging 

Reclaiming the Dominican Vision for the 21 st 
Century: a Challenge for Aging 
Contemplative Communities 92:20-26 

- Perkins, OP, Ignatius 

The Gentle Art of Growing Old 01 :3-8 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 



The Inner Mountain 83:14-19 

- Sr. Miriam (Elmira) 

Anthropology, Christian 

Christian Anthropology and Dominican 
Monastic Life 94:18-21 

- Sr. Thomas Mary (N. Guilford) 

Aquinata, Mother Mary, 1894-1989 

Liturgy of Christian Burial for Mother Mary 
Aquinata 

of the Crucifixion, OP (Homily) 89/Fall:104-108 

- Confer, OP, Bernard 



Annunciation - Meditation 

A Reflection on the Annunciation 94:77-78 

- Sr. Miriam (Lufkin) 

Anthony, St., 250-356 

Anthony, Monastic Friend (litany) 89/Spring:73 

- Sr. Mary of the Assumption (W. Spring.) 



Art, Contemporary 

Towards Understanding Contemporary Art 
95:67-80 - Sr. Mary Grace (Bronx) 

Praying Before a Picture 98:34-44 

- Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farmington H.) 



89 



Art, Dominican 

Lectio With a Fresco Noli Me Tangere by 
FraAngelico 99:62-72 

- Sr. Marie Dominic (Farmington H.) 
Praying with a Picture: Coronation of the 

Virgin - Fra Angelico 00:89-91 

- Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farmington H.) 

Asceticism 

The Challenge of Self-Sacrificing Love 

89/Fall:32-39 - Sr. Denise Marie (Summit) 



Astronomy 

Love's Massive Majesty and the 

Superstar 97:83-91 - Sr. 
(Lufkin) 
Star Dust 93:51-54 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 



Mary Regina 



Atheism 

Applied Research on Modern Atheism in 
Western Society 89/Spring:86-90 

- Sr. Mary Rosario (Los Angeles) 

Augustine, St., 354-430 

Freedom Through the Community as Found in 
the Monastic Tradition 89/Spring:54-63 

- O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 

Augustine, St., 354-430. Rule 

SEE 
Rule of St. Augustine 
Augustine, St., 354-430. Writings 

Love of God and Love of Neighbor in the 
Writings of St. Augustine 97:9-1 5 

- S. Pascale-Dominique (Lourdes) 

Authority 

Community Discernment in Choosing Those in 

Authority 90:33-38 - Sr. Mary Jeremiah 
(Lufkin) 
Nehemiah; a Model Leader 90:11-14 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Authority - Role of 

Towards a Greater Democracy: a Look at the 
Shift in the Role of Authority Between 
Pachomius and Augustine 90:19-23 

- Sr. Mary Lucy of the Divine Word (Buffalo) 



B 



Bernard of Clairvaux, St., 1090-1153 

The Proof is in the Pudding: St. Bernard of 
Clairvaux, Peter Abelard, and St. Thomas 
Aquinas 98:101-102 

- Sr. Mary Emmanuel (Buffalo) 

Bible -Canon 

Contemporary Issues in Scripture: Some Helpful 
Reading 97:34-51 - Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 

Bible - Hermeneutics 

Contemporary Issues in Scripture: 
Some Helpful Reading 97:34-51 

- Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 

Bible. O.T., Ezekiel 

Ezekiel and the Dominicans 93:29-34 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Bible. O.T., Jonah 

Jonah and Jonah 86:110-115 

- Sr. Mary of the Cross (Bocaue, Philippines) 

Bible. O.T., Judges 

The Yearning in Gideon's Heart 89/Fall:24-28 

- Sr. Mary Vincent (Farmington H.) 

Bible. O.T., Nehemiah 

Nehemiah; a Model Leader 90:11-14 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Bible. O.T., Prophecies 

Ezekiel and the Dominicans 93:29-34 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Bible. O.T., Psalms 

A Psalm of Introduction to the Psalms 

02-03:57-58 - Sr. Jude Marie Thaddeus 
(Elmira) 

Bible. O.T. Psalms - Commentary 

Five Psalms 02-03:59-64 

- Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (West Springfield) 
Jerome and His Commentary on 

Psalm 83(84) 97:80-82 

- Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 
Praying the Psalms 01:32-63 

Vesco, OP, Jean-Luc, author 
Sr. Maria of the Cross, trans. (Summit) 
King David's Psalm of Psalms: Psalm 62(63) 

01:64-7 - Sr. Mary Margaret Benedicta 
(Elmira) 



90 



Bible. O.T. Psalms - Laments 

King David's Psalm of Psalms: Psalm 62(63) 
01 :64-72 - Sr. Mary Margaret Benedicta 
(Elmira) 

Bible. N.T., Ephesians 

Blessed in Christ with the Fullness of God 
05:141-155 - Sr. Mary Vincent (Farm. H.) 

Bible. NT., Hebrews 

Hebrews: Achievement, Assurance, Abundance 
01:18-26 -Sr. Mary Vincent, (Farmington H.) 

Bible. N.T., John 

The Dust Artist: a Meditation on John 8:1-16 
97:53-58 - Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 

Bible. NT., Philemon 

Authority and Communio in Philemon 90:15-17 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 

Bible. NT., Romans 

The Father in Paul's Letter to the Romans 
00:104-110 -Sr. Mary Vincent (Farm. H.) 

Bible. NT. - Criticism and Interpretation 

The Gospels 94:74-76 

- Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 
Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: 

Parts I and II Matthew & Luke 02-03:29-48 

- Sr. Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella (Farm. H.) 
Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: 

Parts III and IV Mark & John 06:49-67 
-Sr. Mary(Margaret) Emmanuella (Farm. H.) 

Bible. NT. - Theology 

Come to the Father: A Kaleidoscope-View of 
the Father in the New Testament 99:3-27 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (West Spring.) 

Blanche of Prouille, 13th C. 

The Venerable Sister Blanche of Prouihle 
from the French of J.J. Berthier, OP 
80:18-19 - .Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. 
Spring.) 

Brothers and Sisters of St. John 
(Congregation) 

Grandsons of St. Dominic 94:68-73 

- Sr. Mary Grace, (Bronx) 



Byrne, Damian, 1929-1996 

The Work of the Master's Hand: Letters and 
Vision of Father Damian Byrne, OP 
92:120-124 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 



Canon Law 

SEE 
Law - Church 

Cassian, John, 360(?)-432/435 

Dominican Monastic Profession 83:132-135 

- Sr. Claire (N. Glfd) 

Freedom for God in the Monastic Writings of 
John Cassian 89/Spring:43-53 

- Sr. Mary Ann (N. Glfd) 

Knowing and Enjoying God: Cassian's View of 
Monastic Progress 89/Fall:41-49 

- Sr. Susan H. (N. Glfd) 

Catherine of Siena, St., 1347-1380 

Aquinas's Theology of Trinitarian Mission and 
the Dialogue of Catherine of Siena 
95:60-66 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Catherine of Siena: Her Fellowship of Friends 
06:20-29 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Catherine, Woman of Prayer 82:128-139 

- Sr. Mary of God (N. Guilford) 

The Exchange (A Homily) 02-03:pg. 49 

- Sr. Mary Vincent (Farm. H.) 
Friendship Between St. Catherine of Siena 

and St. Agnes of Montepulciano 06:30-32 

- Sr. Mary Agnes (Lufkin) 

"In the Name of Sweet Mary" 87:7-13 

- Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 

The Love of Truth and the Truth of Love in 
Catherine of Siena's Mysticism 89/Fall:96-1 03 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Peace and Restlessness in St. Catherine of 
Siena 91:25-30 - Sr. Mary Regina 
(Farm. H.) 

St. Catherine and Holy Discretion 99:73-83 

- Sr. Mary Joseph (Farmington H.) 
Such a Woman.. .Such a Saint! 80:22-23 

- Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 

This Pearl of Great Price, Our Catherine 
89/Fall:90-95 - Sr. Cynthia Mary (Summit) 



91 



Cenobitism 

Cenobitic Beginnings: the Pachomian 
Monastic Experience 80:10-17 

- Sr. Lauren Marie (N. Glfd) 

Charity 

Do You Not Know You Are a Temple of God? 

97:3-8 - Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart 
(Marbury 
Love of God and Love of Neighbor in the 

Writings of Saint Augustine 97:9-1 5 

- S. Pascale-Dominique (Lourdes)On Love of 
God and Love of Neighbor 85:17-20 

- Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 

Communio in Dominican Life 

At the Wellspring of Trinitatian Communion: 
Footnote to Verbi Sponsa 00:96-100 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 

of the Order of Preachers: 
Part II 99:85-125 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 
Common Life in the Dominican Tradition: An 

Enduring Observance in the Unity of the 
Triune God 00:62-7 

- Sr. Denise Marie (Summit) 
Communio and Missio 85:56-59 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 

Holiness, Simplicity and Communio in Dominican 
Monastic Life 05:31-40 

- Corbett, OP, John 

Some Reflections on the Metaphysical Basis 
of Communio According to Saint Thomas 
Aquinas 90:2-4 

- Sr. Mary of the Precious Blood (Buffalo) 

Community 

St. Gregory of Nyssa and the Four Dominican 
Observances 01 :9-1 7 -Sr. Mary Thomas 
(Lufkin) 

Understanding Enclosure in Contemporary 
Society 96:101-121 - Barron, OP, William 

Community - Biblical teaching 

Community as the Image of the Trinity 
90:5-10 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Dominican Nuns as Followers of Christ: 
Common Life and Evangelical Counsels 
86:29-46 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 



Community - Moral and ethical aspects 

Community and Solitude 90:39-44 
-Sr. Susan H. (N. Glfd) 

Community Life (Religious) 

Freedom Through the Community as Found 
in the Monastic Tradition 89/Spring:54-63 

- O'Donnell, OP. Gabriel 

Dominican Monastic Values: a Personal Witness 
05:104-110 -Sr. Marie Tersidis (Lufkin) 

Congar, Yves, 1904-1995 

Yves Congar: Theologian and Contemplative 
94:89-92 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Conscience 

Dominican Conscience 97:17-19 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Consecration 

Aspects of Religious Consecration 84:48-52 

- Ramsey, OP, Boniface 

"Sub Tuum Praesidium" 05:125-140 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 

Contemplation 

Beauty, Contemplation and the Virgin Mary 
00:92-95 - Sr. Thomas Mary (N. Glfd) 
Contemplation in Our Modern Times 83:55-58 

- Sr. Mary Roseanne (Bronx) 
Ezekiel and the Dominicans 93:29-34 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 
Formed by the Word, Taught by the Spirit, 

We Dare to Study 92:100-110 

- Sr. Susan H. (N. Glfd) 

Faith, Theology and Contemplation 98:97-100 

- Sr. Daria (N. Glfd) 

Of Mary, Martha, Abraham, and Us 89/Fall:19-23 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 
Prayer as Relationship: God and the Self 

83:67-86 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
Reading and Prayer -Thomas Camelot, OP 
85:112-120 

- Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. Spring.) 
The River that Gives Joy to God's City: 

Scriptural Reflections on Dominican 
Contemplative Life and Prayer 02-03:21-28 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Lufkin) 

A Reflection on Memory and Contemplation 
00:101-103 -Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farm. H.) 

Theology and Contemplation in the 
Dominican Tradition 95:81-84 

- Sr. Mary Vincent (Farm. H.) 



92 



Contemplative life 

Address to the Presidents of the Federation 
of Spanish Dominican Nuns 
-- Jerome Hamer, OP, 87:56-60 

- Sr. Ruth Ann Mary, trans. (Summit) 
Be What You Are, Contemplatives 

84:187-189 - Sr. Mary Joseph (Los Angeles) 
Contemplative Life, Saint Thomas and 
Passive Entertainment 95:55-59 

- Sr. Mary Augustine (Los Angeles) 
Contemplative Life For Women in the Church 

Today: One Nun's Opinion 98:2-6 

- Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farmington H.) 
Contemplative Religious Women - the American 

Situation 25 Years Later 92:144-150 

- Sr. Mary of the Precious Blood (Buffalo) 
Father Vicaire on the Contemplative Life: 

Report of Father Vicaire's Conferences 

85:77-80 - prepared by Sr. Myriam 

(Belgium) 
The Gift of Sadness in the Contemplative Life 

05:79-90 - Goergen, OP, Donald 
God Who Reveals Himself 92:141-143 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo Park) 
Homily (untitled) 89/Spring:3-5 

-Ashley, OP, Benedict 
In Journeying Often 98:10-14 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo Park) 
The Inner Mountain 83:14-19 

- Sr. Miriam (Elmira) 

Modern Psychology and Contemplative Life 

94:22-30 - Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 
Our Contemplative Formation 80:43 

- Anonymous - Spanish Dominican Nun) 
Our Contemplative Quest for Truth From a 

Dominican Perspective 96:23-27 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Prayer as Relationship: God and the Self 

83:67-86 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
The Relationship of Study to Our Dominican 

Contemplative Life 80:26-30 

-Sr. Maria Christi (N. Glfd) 
The Role of Solitude in Dominican 

Contemplative Life 85:47-52 

- Sr. Denise Marie (Sr. Mary Bernard) 
(Summit) 

Study and Contemplative Prayer 

-- Fabio Giardini, OP author 91:43-46 

- Sr. Maria of the Cross, trans. (Summit) 
Truth and the Future of Contemplatives 

80:46-49 - Congar, OP, Yves 



Witnesses From the Desert 91:63-70 
Mary Mary Teresa Ortega Olmedo 

- Sr. Mary of the Holy Cross, trans. (Buffalo) 

Contenson, Guillaume V., 1641-1674 
Theology of the Mind and Heart 

To Know and To Love 89/Fall:79-81 

- Sr. Mary of the Cross (Bocaue, Philippines) 

Cormier, Hyacinth-Marie, 1832-1916 

Hyacinth-Marie Cormier, OP 

(extracts from 3 French books) 83:169-178 

- Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. Spring.) 

Covenants (Theology) 

Covenant 84:134-138 

- Sr. Mary Dolores (N. Glfd) 
Peace and Consensus 91:9-18 

- Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Croix Laval, Marie de la, d. 1883, 

Grateful Memories of an Enduring Presence 
83:123-124 

- Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 

Cross - Meditation 

The Tale of the Wood 83:179-182 

- Sr. Violet Ann (Syracuse) 

Culture conflict 

The Current Moral Climate in the U.S.A. 

and Its Impact on Monastic Life 96:39-43 

-Sr. Ruth Bernard (N. Glfd) 
Individualism 95:42-48 

-Sr. Susan E. (N. Glfd) 

Culture, contemporary 

Dominican Monastic Observance in the 
Contemporary Context 00:30-35 
-O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 

The Impact of Modern Culture on Monasticism 
83:151-158 

- Sr. Frances Clare (Bronx) 

Parting With Illusion: the Challenge of Monastic 
Formation in an Age of Immediacy 
96:52-60 - Corbett, OP, John 

Preparing to Converse With Modern Culture 
94:6-10 - Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 

A Radiant Center of Charity: At the Heart 
of the Holy Preaching 96:122-137 

- Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 



93 



Understanding the Contemporary Theology 
of the Human Person 96:5-9 

- Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 

Curupira Ido Tuba, 1901-1974 

Curupira's Rosary 85:70-71 

- Sr. Mary of the Trinity, trans. (Lufkin) 
The Sanctity of Curupira 

85:68-69 

- Sr. Marie Damien du Sacre-Coeur, 
(Brazil) 



Descartes, Rene, 1596-1650 

Letter to Rene Descartes 94:102-108 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Discernment 

Community Discernment in Choosing 
Those in Authority 90:33-38 

- Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 

Discipline, Penitential 

SEE 
Penitential discipline 

Divine Office 

SEE 
Liturgy of the Hours 

Dominic, St., 1170-1221 

Dominic and the Early Monastic Tradition 
06:8-13 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Dominic: You Could Have Turned Back 

06:14-18 - Sr. Mary Vincent (Farmington H.) 

Historical Background of St. Dominic's Life 
and of the Foundation of the Order; and 
Summary of Subsequent History 83:106-122 

- Sr. Mary Stephen (Elmira) 

Look to the Rock from Which You Were Hewn 
83:137-139 - Sr. Dominic Marie (Buffalo) 
The "O Lumen" in Portraiture 83:93-94 

- Sr. Mary of the Precious Blood (Buffalo) 
Pursuing Communion in Government: Role of 

Community Chapter 92:38-50 

- O'Dwyer, OP, Malachy 

Saint Dominic (1935 talk by Cardinal Pacelli) 
84:168-185 

- Sr. Mary of the Trinity prepared by 
Sr. Myriam 

trans. (Menlo Park) 



Saint Dominic and His Love for the 

Liturgy 83:90-92 - Sr. Mary Margaret, 
(Elmira) 

St. Dominic and Dominican Origins 
andCharism 86:18-27 

- Sr. Mary of God (N. Glfd) 

Dominic, St., 1170-1221. Nine Ways 
of Prayer 

Adoration: St. Dominic's Humble Prayer 

06:3-7 - Sr. Regina, Mary (Langley) 
St. Dominic's First Way of Prayer 

82:88-90 - Sr. Maria Cabrini (Lufkin) 
St. Dominic's Second Way of Prayer 

82:91-93 Sr. Victor Marie (Lufkin) 
St. Dominic's Third Way of Prayer 

82:94-97 - Sr. Mary William (Lufkin) 
The Fourth Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

83:31-34 - Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 
The Fifth Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

83:35-38 - Sr. Mary Hyacinth (Lufkin) 
The Sixth Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

83:39-43 - Sr. Mary Magdalen (Lufkin) 
The Seventh Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

84:151-154 - Sr. Maria Christina (Lufkin) 
The Eighth Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

84:155-157 - Sr. Maria Rosario (Lufkin) 
The Ninth Way of St. Dominic's Prayer 

84: 1 58-1 64 - Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 

Dominican Charism 

Approaches to Our Charism 

I. Structures 80:1-6 

II. Study: a Heritage Re-gained 80:32-38 

- Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 

A Broad and Joyous Way 89/Spring:6-14 

- Ashley, OP, Benedict 

The Charism of St. Dominic and of the 
Dominican Order: a Spiritual Reflection 
83:101-105 

- Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 
Chez Les Dominicaines (Reports in Le Lien) 

80:44-45 - Anonymous 
(French Dominican Nuns) 
Ezekiel and the Dominicans 93:29-34 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 
A Parable of the Word 92:73 

- Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 

Saint Dominic and Women: a Dialogue with 
the Modern World 98:69-80 
- Sr. Mary(Margaret)Emmanuella 
(Farmington H.) 
See What Love the Father Has! 99:28-34 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 



94 



Dominican Government 

Dominican Government Today 
Parti: 84:82-92; Part II: 93-103 

- Doyle, OP, Thomas 

Dominican Government Today in the Light of 
Our Legislative Heritage and the Church's 
General Law 84:104-116 

- Doyle, OP, Thomas 

Freedom for God - Freedom in Communion 
98:15-29 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Freedom Through the Community as Found 
in the Tradition of Dominican Government 
89/Spring:64-70 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

In the Beginning There Was Consensus 
93:9-12 -Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 

Observance in the Dominican Tradition and 
in the Constitutions of the Nuns 89/Fall:2-10 

- Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
Reflections on the Spirit and Structure 

of Dominican Government 

86:75-81 - Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 

Dominican Government. Basic 
Constitution of the Order 

The Basic Constitution of the Order 
84:15-21 - O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 

Dominican Government. Chapter 

Freedom for God - Freedom in Communion 
98:15-29 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Freedom Through the Community as Found 
in the Tradition of Dominican Government 
89/Spring:64-70 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Peace and Consensus 91 :9-1 8 

- Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Pursuing Communion in Government- Role of 
Community Chapter 92:38-50 

- O'Dwyer, OP, Malachy 

Dominican Nuns 

Approaches to Our Charism 

I. Structures 80:1-6 

II. Study: a Heritage Re-gained 80:32-38 

- Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 
Chez Les Dominicaines (Reports in Le Lien) 

80:44-45 - Anonymous 
(French Dominican Nuns) 
A Distinctive Identity: Dominican 
Contemplative Nuns 83:125-128 

- Sr. Marie Incarnation (N. Glfd) 
Dominican Common Prayer-Nuns 

83:87-89 - Sr. Mary of God (N. Glfd) 



The Dominican Vision: Roots of Our Monastic 
Life. ..Integration of Its Elements 92:2-10 

- Sr. Mary Magdalen (Braun) (Farmington H.) 
The Gospel: Supreme Pattern of Dominican 

Monastic Life 86:5-10 

- Sr. Mary Magdalen (Braun) (Farmington H.) 
Historical Background of St. Dominic's Life 

and of the Foundation of the Order; 
and Summary of Subsequent History 
83:106-122 - Sr. Mary Stephen (Elmira) 
The Ideal of a Dominican Contemplative Nun 

84:139-147 - Sr. Mary Rose Dominic 
(Summit) 
In Journeying Often 98:10-14 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo Park) 
Informal Comments on the Constitutions and 

Life of the Nuns 84:5-14 

- Byrne, OP, Damian 

John the Baptist and the Dominican Nuns 
98:45-48 Sr. Mary Regina (Farmington H.) 

Little Flowers of the Dominican Sisters 
06:33-38 Siekowski, OP, Michal, author 

- Rzeczkowski, OP, Matthew, trans. 
The "Pleiades" and the "God of War" in a 

Dominican Sky 05:111-115 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 

St. Dominic and Dominican Origins and 
Charism 86:1 8-27 - Sr. Mary of God (N. 
Glfd) 

Vocation of the Dominican Contemplative 
Nuns 80:7-9 

- Sr. Marie Rosaria (Cainta, Philippines) 

Dominican Nuns. Constitutions 

Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 
of the Order of Preachers: 
Part I: (Fundamental Const.) 98:49-68 
Part II 99:85-125 
Part III 00:118-143 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 
Comparative Study on Regular Observance - 

Old and New Constitutions 85:24-38 

- Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
Dominican Conscience 97:17-19 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 
Dominican Vision for the Future: a Reflection 

92:74-80 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
An Expression of Our Identity 

in Our Revised Constitutions 83:129-131 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Farmington H.) 
The Following of Christ through Religious 

Consecration as Dominican Nuns 84:34-47 

- Sr. Mary Catherine (Elmira) 



95 



Freedom for God - Freedom in Communion 
98:15-29 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Informal Comments on the Constitutions and 
Life of the Nuns 84:5-14 

- Byrne, OP, Damian 

Radiant Center of Charity - At the Heart of 
the Holy Preaching 96:122-137 

- Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 

The Scriptural Meaning of Freedom as 
Reflected in Our Constitutions and 
Other Related Documents 89/Spring:23-31 

- Sr. Mary Martin (Summit) 

The Word of God in LCM - Logos and Rhema 
95:35-37 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Dominican Nuns. Fundamental 
Constitutions 

Augustinian Themes in Our Basic 
Constitutions 85:21-23 

- Sr. Mary of the Precious Blood (Buffalo) 
Basic Constitutions of the Nuns 

84:22-33 - Sr. Mary of God (N. Glfd) 
Fundamental Constitution of the Nuns of the 
Order of Preachers: a Commentary 98:49-68 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 

Dominican Nuns - History 

The Dominican Nuns: Historical Highlights 

90:75-90 - Bedouelle, OP, Guy 
Dominican Nuns of Paris 86:96-102 

- Sr. Mary of the Cross (Bocaue, Philippines) 
Roots and Buds International 06:68-75 

- Sr. Mary of God (N. Guilford) 

Dominican Nuns. Role in Order 

A Life Harmoniously Ordered to the Continual 
Remembrance of God 05:3-10 

- Goergen, OP, Donald 

Prayer, Study, and the Life of Withdrawal 

92:51-72 - Barron, OP, William 
The Reality of the Lived Experience: Areas 

to Be Explored 92:11-19 

- Sr. Mary of Mercy (Farmington H.) 
The Strong City 91:38-40 

- Sr. Gracemary (Buffalo) 

Preachers of the Silent Word in a New Century 
02-03:13-20 - Sr. Mary Catharine (Summit) 

Dominican Nuns - United States 

Centenary for Dominican Nuns 
in the United States 80:50-51 

- Sr. Mary Magdalen (Braun) (Farm. H.) 



Letter to Louis Mary Cardinal Caverot, 
Archbishop of Lyons (1880) 80:52 

- Corrigan, Bishop Mary (Newark) 

Dominican Saints 

SEE 
Saints, Dominican 

Dominican Sisters 

The First Constitutions of the Dominican 
Sisters of Montargis (1250) 87:72-86 
Creytens, OP, Raymond author 

- Pierre Conway, OP, trans. 
Little Flowers of the Dominican Sisters 

06:33-38 Sieykowski, Michal, OP, author 

- Rzeczkowski, OP, Matthew, trans. 

Dominican Spirituality 

SEE 
Dominicans - Spiritual life 

Dominicans - History 

Dominican Missionary Preachers to the 
New World 05:116-124 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Historical Background of St. Dominic's Life 
and of the Foundation of the Order; and 
Summary of Subsequent History 
83:106-122 - Sr. Mary Stephen (Elmira) 

Origin of Dominican Coat of Arms 

83:136 - Sr. Louis Bertrand (W. Spring.) 

Pursuing Communion in Government - Role 
of Community Chapter 92:38-50 

- O'Dwyer, OP, Malachy 

St. Dominic and Dominican Origins and Charism 

86:18-27 - Sr. Mary of God (N. Glfd) 
St. Dominic and His Love for the Liturgy 

83:90-92 - Sr. Mary Margaret (Elmira) 
Dominicans - Meditations 
A Fruit of Lectio at Office of Readings 

95:39-40 - Sr. Clara Marie (Farm. H.) 
Dominican Vocation-ln a Word (Homily) 

98:7-9 - Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farm. H.) 

Dominicans - Missions 

Dominican Missionary Preachers to the 
New World 05:116-124 

- Sr. Mary Regina(Langley) 

Dominicans - Monastic Sources 

Blessed Jordan of Saxony on 
Lectio Divina 90:61-74 

- Sr. Mary Catherine (Elmira) 



96 



Dominicans - Profession 

SEE 
Profession (in religious orders, 
congregations, etc.)-Dominican 

Dominicans - Spiritual Initiation & 
Ongoing Development 

Spiritual Initiation and Ongoing 
Development 86:69-74 

- Sr. Maria of the Holy Eucharist (W. Spring.) 

Dominicans - Spiritual life 

Dominican Vocation: In a Word (Homily) 
98:7-9 - Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farm. H.) 

My Eyes Are Ever Towards the Lord 

92:131-136 - Sr. Mary Catharine (Summit) 

The Mystery of Divine Communion and 
the Monastic Life 00:3-16 

- DiNoia, OP, Augustine 

Prayer and Spiritual Growth in Dominican Life 

82:83-84 - Sr. Dominic Marie (Buffalo) 
The Prayer of St. Dominic 

and the Early Dominicans: 

Parti: 83:20-30 

Part II: 84:119-127 

- Sr. Mary Martin (Summit) 

The River that Gives Joy to God's City: 
Scriptural Reflections on Dominican 
Contemplative Life and Prayer 02-03:21-28 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Lufkin) 
A Trilogy 85:61-66 

- Sr. Mary Margaret (Buffalo) 
The World as We Know It 94:2-5 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 



Ebner, Margaret, 1291(?)-1351 

Beatification of Margaret Ebner, OP 

80:20-21 

-Sr. Mary Clare Patrick, trans. (N. Glfd) 
Margaret Ebner (from 

Annee Dominicaine) 82:142-148 

-Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. Spring.) 

Eckhart, Meister, 1260(?)-1 327/28. 

The Birth of the Word in the Soul 

05:20-30 - Burton-Christie, Douglas 
The 'Naked Spirit' in Eckhart's Counsels on 

Discernment 83:44-54 . 

-Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 



Economics 

The Effects of Modern Economics on Our 
Way of Life 96:85-91 

- Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 

The Effects of Modern Economics on Our Way 
of Life 96:93-98 - Ramsey, OP, Boniface 

Elizabeth of the Trinity, 1880-1906 

Elizabeth of the Trinity and The Interior Castle 
85:98-1 11 - Sr. Mary Regina (Farmington H.) 

In Praise of the God of Love: 
Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity 
95:28-34 - Sr. Mary Dolores (N. Glfd) 

Enclosure (Monasticism) 

At the Heart of the "Holy Preaching" 

Toward a Theology of Dominican Monastic 
Enclosure: History, Principles, Praxis 
94:41-54 - Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 

At the Wellspring of Trinitarian Communion: 
Footnote to Verbi Sponsa 00:96-100 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
In Journeying Often 98:10-14 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo Park) 
The Observances of Silence and Enclosure 

00:36-46 - Sr. Claire (N Glfd) 
Prayer, Study, and the Life of Withdrawal 

92:51-72 - Barron, OP, William 
The Question of Enclosure Today: a Response 

94:31-40 - Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 
A Radiant Center of Charity - At the Heart of 

the Holy Preaching 96:122-137 

- Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 
Understanding Enclosure in Contemporary 

Society 96:101-121 - Barron, OP, William 
Verbi Sponsa and Dominican Monastic Life 
00:47-61 - Whitt, OP, Reginald 

Evangelical counsels 

My Eyes Are Ever Towards the Lord 

92:131-136 - Sr. Mary Catharine (Summit) 

Evangelization 

Star of Evangelization 93:35-37 

- Sr. Mary Agnes (Lufkin) 



97 



Faith 

Empty Vessels: An Allegory 84: 1 49-1 50 

- Sr. Mary of the Precious Blood (Buffalo) 

Fatherhood of God 

Come to the Father: A Kaleidoscope-View of the 
Father in the New Testament 99:3-27 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (West Spring.) 
See What Love the Father Has! 99:28-34 

- Sr. Sacred Heart, Mary of the (Marbury) 
When we Cry "Abba, Father!" 

90:46-48 - Sr. Mary Margaret (Buffalo) 
The Father in Paul's Letter to the Romans 

00:104-1 10 - Sr. Mary Vincent (Farm. H.) 

Formation 

Culture Shock: Reflections on the Dynamics 
of Inculturation and Formation 94:11-17 

- Sr. Judith Miryam (Summit) 

Mid-Life Novitiate: My Occasion for Profound 
Human Growth 98:81-88 

- Sr. Marina (Summit) 

Parting With Illusion: the Challenge of 

Monastic Formation in an Age of Immediacy 
96:52-60 - Corbert, OP, John 

Our Contemplative Formation 80:43 
Anonymous - (Spanish Dominican Nun) 

Freedom 

A Broad and Joyous Way 89/Spring:6-14 

- Ashley, OP, Benedict 

Freedom Through Community as Found in the 
Monastic Tradition 89/Spring :54-63 

- O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 
Christian and Modern ideas of Freedom: 

Contrast and Convergence 

89/Spring:32-41 - DiNoia, OP, Augustine 
The Meaning of Freedom in Scripture 

89/Spring: 15-22 - McCreesh, OP, Thomas 
The Scriptural Meaning of Freedom as 

Reflected in Our Constitutions and Other 

Related Documents 89/Spring:23-31 

- Sr. Martin, Mary (Summit) 

Friendship - Religious Aspects 

The Place of Friendship in Our Monastery 
Chapters 90:53 - Sr. Mary Agnes (Buffalo) 



Garibal, Marguerite de la (Mere), d.1650(?) 

Dominican Nuns of Paris 86:96-1 02 

- Sr. Cross, Mary of the (Bocaue, Philippines) 

Gregory, St., 540(?)-604 

Dear Friend St. Gregory (Litany) 

89/Spring:71-72 -Sr. Mary of the Pure Heart 
and Sr. Mary of the Assumption (W. Spring.) 

Gregory of Nyssa, St., C.340-C.394 

St. Gregory of Nyssa and the Four Dominican 
Observances 01:9-17 - Sr. Mary Thomas 
(Lufkin) 



H 



Habit - Reception 

This Hidden Life 85:90-91 

Mary Teresa Mary Ortega Olmedo 

- Sr. Mary of the Holy Cross, trans. (Buffalo) 

Happiness 

Dominicans and Happiness 05:65-78 

- Murray, OP, Paul 

Health care 

Reclaiming the Dominican Vision for the 21 st 
Century: a Challenge for Aging 
Contemplative Communities 92:20-26 

- Perkins, OP, Ignatius 

Hesychasm 

To Become a Hesychast 82:1 14-118 
-Sr. Mary John (N.GIfd) 

Holiness 

Holiness, Simplicity and Communio in Dominican 
Monastic Life 05:31-40 

- Corbett, OP, John 
Holy Spirit 

Listen to the Spirit 98:30-33 

- Sr. Mary Joseph (Marbury) 

Homilies 

Dominican Vocation: In a Word 

98:7-9 - Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farm H.) 

Liturgy of Christian Burial for 

Mother Mary Aquinata of the Crucifixion, OP 
89/Fall:104-108 - Confer, OP, Bernard, 

A Suitable Place 85:73-76 

- DiNoia, OP, Augustine 



98 



Untitled Homily 89/Spring:3-5 

- Ashley, OP, Benedict 

A Vespers Homily for the First Sunday of Advent 
99:35-37 - Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farm. H.) 

Hopkins, Gerard Manley.1 844-1 889 

A Short Biography of Gerard Manley 
Hopkins, Poet 86:103-109 

- Sr. Mary Elizabeth (Newark) 

Hospitality - Religious aspects 

At the Sign of the Pineapple - Monastic Aspects 
95:49-54 - Sr. Mary Catharine (Summit) 

Human person (Theology) 

Dear Friend, St. Gregory (Litany) 89/Spring:71-72 

- Sr. Mary of the Pure Heart 

and -Sr. Mary of the Assumption (W. Spring.) 
Prayer as Relationship: God and the Self 

83:67-86 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
Understanding the Contemporary Theology 

of the Human Person 96:10-20 

- Hilkert, OP, Sr. Mary Catherine 
Understanding the Contemporary Theology 

of the Human Person 96:5-9 

- Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 



I 



Icons 

An Introduction to the Study of Icons 

83:163-167 -Sr. Mary of Jesus (Farm. H.), 
and - Sr. Mary Elizabeth (Newark) 

Indexes 

Author Index: (1980-1998) 98:105-113 
(1980-2006) 06:77-88 

- Sr. Susan Early (N. Glfd) 
--Sr. Mary Dominic (Elmira) 

Topic Index: (1980-1999) 99:131-146 
(1980-2006) 06:89-107 
-Sr. Susan Early (N. Glfd) 
--Sr. Mary Dominic (Elmira) 

Individualism 

Individualism 95:42-48 

- Sr. Susan Early (N. Glfd) 
Itinerancy 

In Journeying Often 98: 1 0-1 4 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo Park) 



Jerome, St., 345(?)-41 9/420. Ps. 83(84) 

Jerome and His Commentary on Psalm 83(84) 
97:80-82 - Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 

Jesus Christ 

A Rainbow of Reflections on the 
Holy Name of Jesus 82:98-1 07 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (W. Spring.) 
Jesus Is Lord: A Jubilee Reflection 99:58-61 

- Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 
Putting on the Mind of Christ (short play) 

01 :28-31 - Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 

John the Baptist, St. 

John the Baptist and the Dominican Nuns 
98:45-48 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Johnson, Elizabeth 

Understanding the Contemporary Theology 
of the Human Person 96:10-20 

- Hilkert, OP, Sr. Mary Catherine 

Jordan of Saxony, 1185-1237 

Blessed Jordan of Saxony on Lectio Divina 
90:61-74 - Sr. Mary Catherine (Elmira) 

Joseph, St. 

A Never Fading Vision 

92:137-140 - Sr. Mary Emmanuel (W. 
Spring.) 
Joseph 85:81-84 

- Sr. Mary of the Assumption (W. Spring.) 
Joy 

SEE 
Happiness 



Law - Church 

Verbi Sponsa and Dominican Monastic Life 
00:47-61 - Whitt, OP, Reginald 

Leclercq, Jean, 1911-1992. The Love of 
Learning and the Desire for God 

Contemporary Issues in Scripture: Some 
Helpful Reading 97:34-51 
- Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 



99 



Lectio Divina 

Blessed Jordan of Saxony on Lectio Divina 
90:61-74 - Sr. Mary Catherine (Elmira) 

Dominican Study and the Experience of God 
84:53-67 - Walsh, OP, Liam 

Florilegia on Saint Augustine's Letter 21 1 
85:5-16 

- Sr. Agnes, Maria (Summit) 
How Lectio in the "Monastic Way" is 

Still Relevant Today 80:39-40 

- Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 
Lectio Divina 89/Fall: 1 6-1 8 

- Sr. Mary Martin (Trinidad) 
Value and Practice of Lectio Divina 

84:68-81 - Sr. Mary Magdalen (Braun) 
(Farmington H.) 

Leloup, Words From Mount Athos 

SEE 
Monasticism, Eastern 

Lindbeck, George, 1923- 

Scripture, Theology and the Nature of Doctrine 
in Aquinas and in the Thought of Postliberal 
Theologian George Lindbeck 94:93-101 

- Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Ligiez, Vincent, OP 

SEE 
Rosary 



Lonergan, Bernard, 1904-1984 

The Basis of Lonergan's Theological Method 
94:86-88 

- Sr. Mary Precious Blood (Buffalo) 

In Love With the Universe: a Brief Introduction 
to the Work of Bernard Lonergan 97:59-78 

- Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farmington H.) 
Understanding the Contemporary Theology 

of the Human Person 96:10-20 

- Hilkert, OP, Sr. Mary Catherine 

Love of God 

SEE 
Charity 

Love of neighbor 

Love of God and Love of Neighbor in the 
Writings of St. Augustine 97:9-1 5 

- S. Pascale-Dominique (Lourdes) 

On Love of God and Love of Neighbor 

85:17-20 - Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 



M 



Mandatum 

Mandatum 2001 :the Need for Beauty 

01:1-2 -Sr. Mary Rose (Farmington H.) 

A Trinitarian Mystery: the "Mandatum" 
02-03:50-52 - Sr. Mary Rose (Farm. H.) 



Liturgy 

Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 
of the Order of Preachers: Part III 00:118-143 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 
The Eternal Now of the Liturgy 

85:85- Sr. Mary William (Lufkin) 
Heaven and Earth Embrace: the Celebration of 

the Liturgy in Dominican Contemplative Life 

05:11-19 -O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 
St. Dominic and His Love for the Liturgy 

83:90-92 - Sr. Mary Margaret (Elmira) 

Liturgy of the Hours 

God Who Reveals Himself 92:141-143 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo) 
Revisiting Familiar Territory: Tuning Our 

Minds to Our Voices 06:40-44 

- Sr. Mary Magdalen (Braun) (Farmington H.) 



Manual work (See also: Work) 

Manual Labor - a Monastic Observance for 
Dominican Nuns 91:51-62 

- Sr. Marie Rosaria (Cainta, Philippines) 
Mary, Blessed Virgin 

Beauty, Contemplation and the Virgin Mary 
00:92-95 - Sr. Thomas Mary (N. Glfd) 
Forma Dei 89/Fall:82-89 

- Sr. Gracemary (Buffalo) 
Homemaker 83:162 

- Sr. Mary Amata (Buffalo) 
"In the Name of.. .Sweet Mary" 

87:7-13 - Sr. Mary Jeremiah (Lufkin) 
Mary and the Virtue of Trust 84:190-192 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Mary in the Incarnation and the Signs of the 

Times 87:15-21 -Sr. Virginia Mary (Summit) 
Pilgrim Virgin, Pilgrim Church 87:2-6 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 
Praying with a Picture: Coronation of the 

Virgin - Fra Angelico 00:89-91 

- Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farmington H.) 



100 



Sign of Hope 87:22-24 

- Sr. Giuseppina, Mary (Italy) 
"Sub Tuum Praesidium" 05:125-140 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 
Until Jesus Be Formed in You: 

a Marian Short Story 98:91-96 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 

Mary Magdalen, St. 

Homily on Magdalen by Origen 00:1 1 1-1 17 

- Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. Spr.) 

Sainte Baume and Devotion to St. Mary 

Magdalen in the Dominican Order 83:159-161 

- Sr. Mary John (Farmington H.) 

Monastic Observance 

Commentary on the Constitutions 
of the Nuns of the Order of Preachers: 
Part II 99:85-125 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Thomas, Mary, trans. (Buffalo) 
Dominican Monastic Observance as 
Christological and Sacramental in Character 

00:24-29 - O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 
Dominican Monastic Observance in the 
Contemporary Context 00:30-35 

- O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 

Dominican Monastic Values: a Personal Witness 
05:104-110 -Sr. Marie Tersidis (Lufkin) 

Dominican Roots in the Monastic Tradition 
86:1 1-17 - Sr. Mary Magdalen (Langley) 

A Life Harmoniously Ordered to the Continual 
Remembrance of God 05:3-10 

- Goergen, OP, Donald 

Manual Labor - A monastic Observance 
for Dominican Nuns 91:51-62 

- Sr. Marie Rosaria (Cainta, Philippines) 
Regular Chapter as a Workshop for Unity and 

Charity 90:25-32 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
Religious Observances and Transformation 

00:1 7-23 - Corbett, OP, John 
The Role of Solitude in Dominican 
Contemplative Life 85:47-52 

- Sr. Denise Marie (Sr. Mary Bernard) 
(Summit) 

Silence: a Monastic Tradition for Today 
83: 1 43-1 50 - Anonymous (Summit) 

Toward a Monastic Spirituality of Work 
86:59-68 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

The Workaholic Syndrome and Original Sin 
92:86-99 - Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 



Monasticism 

At the Sign of the Pineapple: Monastic 
Hospitality 95:49-54 

- Sr. Mary Catharine (Summit) 
Cenobitic Beginnings: the Pachomian 

Monastic Experience 80:10-17 

- Sr. Lauren Marie (N. Glfd) 
Christian Anthropology and Dominican 

Monastic Life 94:18-21 

- Sr. Thomas Mary (N. Glfd) 
Consecrated to God 89/Fall:1 1-14 

- Sr. Mary Emmanuel (W. Spring.) 
Contemporary Issues in Scripture: Some 

Helpful Reading 97:34-51 -Sr. Lee (N. Glfd) 
Dominic and the Early Monastic Tradition 

06:8-13 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 
Dominican Roots in the Monastic 

Tradition 86:11-17 

- Sr. Mary Magdalen (Langley) 
Enclosure 89/Fall: 66-67 

- Sr. Mary Emmanuel (W. Spring.) 
The Fear of the Lord Is Our Cross - 

Ancient Homily for Monastic Profession: 
An Interpretation 85:92-97 

- Sr. Mary Catherine (Elmira) 
Freedom Through the Community as Found 

In the Monastic Tradition 89/Spring:54-63 
-O'Donnell, OP, Gabriel 
Holiness, Simplicity and Communio in 
Dominican Monastic Life 05:31-40 

- Corbett, OP, John 
Impressions and Advice: "What's It All 

About, Anyway?" 05:91-96 

- McDonough, OP, Sr. Elizabeth 
Lectio and Eruditio in the Rule of San Sisto 

90:57-60 - Sr. Mary Martin (Summit) 

Our Contemplative Quest for Truth from 
A Dominican Perspective 96:23-27 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
Our Monastic Life 89/Spring:74-75 

- Sr. Therese Claire (Bambui, Cameroon) 
The Philosophical Spectrum of the 20 th Century 

In the Light of the Monastic Paradigm 

95:2-15 - Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

The Rule of Augustine for Today 87:27-36 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

The Scriptural Meaning of Freedom as 
Reflected in Our Constitutions and Other 
Related Documents 89/Spring:23-31 

- Sr. Mary Martin (Summit) 
Work - Its Meaning and Value for 

Contemporary Dominican Monastic Life 
92:27-37 - Sr. Mary Magdalen (Langley) 



101 



Monasticism - Eastern 

Words from Mount Athos (LeLoup) 
1:93:15-23; 11:94:79-85; 111:95:85-92 
IV: 97:94-103 

- Sr. Maria of the Cross, trans. (Summit) 

Morality 

Contemporary Views on Morality and Its 
Effects on Society and the 
Contemplative Nun 96:45-51 

- Demkovitch, OP, Michael 

Mysticism 

The Love of Truth and the Truth of Love in 
Catherine of Siena's Mysticism 89/Fall:96-103 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Mysticism, German - 14 th cent. 
The 'Naked Spirit' in Eckhart's Counsels on 
Discernment 83:44-54 

- Sr. Francis, Mary (Farmington H.) 
The Birth of the Word in the Soul 

05:20-30 Burton-Christie, Douglas 



Peace - Moral and religious 
aspects 

Journey to Intimacy 92:125-130 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (W. Spring.) 
Monastic Peace 91:19-21 

- Sr. Mary of the Assumption (W. Spring.) 
PaxChristi 91:32-34 

- Sr. Mary Catherine (Lancaster) 

Penance 

Lead Me in Thy Truth 89/Fall:29-31 

- Sr. Mary of Jesus Crucified (Buffalo) 
Works of Penance 86:47-50 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Farmington H.) 

Penitential Discipline 

Works of Penance 86:47-50 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Farmington H.) 

Perfection, Christian 

Is Perfection Possible? 02-03:53-56 

- Sr. David Marie (Elmira) 

Knowing and Enjoying God: Cassian's View 
of Monastic Progress 
89/Fall:41-49 - Sr. Susan H. (N. Glfd) 



Pachomius, St., 290-346 

Cenobitic Beginnings: the 

Pachomian Monastic Experience 
80:10-17 - Sr. Lauren Marie (N. Glfd) 

Papias, Bishop (A.D.70-155?) 

Value and Implications of Papias 02-03:65-68 

- Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 
Paulinus of Nola, St., 353(?)-431 

Communio in the Monastic Life of Paulinus of 
Nola 90:49-52 - Sr. Mary of the Immaculate 
Conception, (West Springfield) 

Peace 

Called to Peace 91:22-24 

- Sr. Marian Dominic (Lancaster) 
Peace and Restlessness in St. Catherine of 

Siena 91 :25-30 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Peace - Biblical teaching 

Peace 91:2-3 

- Sr. Mary Joseph (N. Guilford) 
Peace and Consensus 91:9-18 

- Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Monastic Peace in Selected Scriptural Texts 
91 :5-7 - Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 



Philippe, Marie-Dominique, OP, 1912- 

Grandsons of St. Dominic 94:68-73 

- Sr. Mary Grace (Bronx) 

Philosophy 

A Letter to Rene Descartes 94:102-108 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Our Contemplative Quest for Truth From a 
Dominican Perspective 96:23-27 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
Philosophical Influences Shaping Life Today 

96:29-36 

- Demkovitch, OP, Michael 

The Philosophical Spectrum in the Light of the 
Monastic Paradigm 95:2-15 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
Philosophy: Its Influence on Our Culture 

and on Our Contemplative Life 95:16-21 

- Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 

Poetry 

Poetry: Speech Framed for Contemplation 
87:38-54 - Sr. Mary Elizabeth (Newark) 

Poverty 

The Effects of Modern Economics on 
Our Way of Life 96:85-91 



102 



- Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 
Toward a Spirituality of Poverty 
89/Fall:70-78 - Sr. Mary 
Emmanuella, (Farmington H.) 



(Margaret) 



Prayer 

A Brief Reflection on the "Adoro Te Devote" 
83:95-97 

- Sr. Mary Rose of the Resurrection (Summit) 
Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 

of the Order of Preachers: Part III 00:118-143 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 
The Content of Anxiety and the Dark Side 

of Prayer 84:129-133 

- Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 
Do You Not Know That You Are a Temple 

of God? 97:3-8 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 
Go into My Vineyard: a Homily 97:31-33 

- Sr. Mary Vincent (Farmington H.) 
God Who Reveals Himself 92:141-143 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo) 
Jesus, Model and Teacher of Prayer in 

the Gospels 83:11-13 -- Sr. Mary of the 
Immaculate Conception (W. Spr.) 
Lectio With a Fresco: Noli Me Tangere - 
FraAngelico 99:62-72 

- Sr. Marie Dominic (Farmington H.) 
Listening to the Word of God 06:45-48 

--Servais Pinckaers, OP, 

--trans. Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 

Of Mary, Martha, Abraham and Us 

89/Fall:19-23 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Prayer as Relationship: God and the Self, 
a Developmental Study 
-Anonymous 83:67-86 

Praying Before a Picture 98:34-44 

- Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farmington H.) 
Praying with a Picture: Coronation of the Virgin 

00:89-91 - Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farm. H.) 
Reading and Prayer (Thomas Camelot, OP) 
85:112-120 

- Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. Springfield) 
Refectory Reading and Prayer 

82:140-141 - Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 
St. Gregory of Nyssa and the Four Dominican 

Observances 01:9-17 -Sr. Mary Thomas 

(Lufkin) 
Study as a Basis for Prayer 82:108-109 

- Sr. Mary Augustine (Syracuse) 



Prayer - Biblical teaching 

Foundations of Prayer in the Old 
Testament 82:121-127 

- Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 

Prayer, intercessory 

The Prayer of Intercession 83:61-66 

- Sr. Marie of the Incarnation (N. Glfd) 

Prayer, mystic 

SEE 
Contemplation 

Profession (in religious orders, 
congregations, etc.) - Dominican 

Dominican Monastic Profession 
83:132-135 - Sr. Claire (N. Glfd) 

Providence - Biblical teaching 

God's Authorship of Creation: His Providence 
Over Creation and Over Man 93:39-49 

- Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 

Psychology 

The Contributions of Modern Psychology 
and Their Interface With the 
Spiritual Dimension 96:67-82 

- Moore, Hallie, MaryD. 

Modern Psychology and Contemplative Life 
94:22-30 - Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 

Preambles to Government 

86:83-95 -Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 

The Pros and Cons of Psychology in Our 
Dominican Contemplative Life 
96:63-66 - Sr. Mary Vincent (Farmington H.) 

A Reflection on Memory and Contemplation 
00:101-103 -Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farm. H.) 



Rahner, Karl, 1904-1984 

Understanding the Contemporary 

Theology of the Human Person 96:10-20 
- Hilkert, OP, Sr. Mary Catherine 

Raphael, Sr. Mary, d.1988 (Buffalo) 

A Tribute to Sr. Mary Raphael 

93:58-61 - Sr. Mary Elizabeth (Buffalo) 



103 



Raymond of Penafort. Constitutions 

The First Constitutions of the Dominican 
Sisters of Montargis (1250) 87:72-86 

- Creytens, OP, Raymond 

- Pierre Conway, OP, trans. 
Retreats for Nuns 

Reflections on a Directed Retreat 

82:85 - Sr. Mary Margaret (Elmira) 
Retreat Experiences 82:110113 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Menlo Park) 

Rosary 

Curupira's Rosary 85:70-71 

-Sr. Mary of the Trinity, trans. (Lufkin) 
Imago's Journey: A One Act Play 

95:96-104 -Sr. Mary Thomas, (Buffalo) 
The Prayer of the Rosary 82:119-120 

- Sr. Michael Marie (Lancaster) 
The 'Prehistory' of the Perpetual Rosary 

Sisters 02-03:1-12 - Sr. Barbara Estelle 
Beaumont (Heme, Belgium) 

Rule of St. Augustine 

Dominican Conscience 97:17-19 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Farmington H.) 
Florilegia on Saint Augustine's Letter 21 1 

85:5-16 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

On Love of God and Love of Neighbor 

85:17-20 - Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 

Rule of St. Augustine: a Response 
to the Culture of Narcissism 
97:20-27 - Sr. Susan E. (N. Glfd) 

The Rule of St. Augustine for Today 

87:27-36 - Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Rule of San Sisto 

Lectio and Eruditio in the Rule of San Sisto 
90:57-60 - Sr. Mary Martin (Summit) 



Saint Dominic's Monastery - Washington, DC 

A Suitable Place (Homily) 85:73-76 

- DiNoia, OP, Augustine 

Saintourens, OP, Damien-Marie 

SEE 
Rosary 

Saints, Dominican 

Friendship Between St. Catherine of Siena 
and St. Agnes of Montepulciano 06:30-32 

- Sr. Mary Agnes (Lufkin) 
Love's Beauty, Massive Majesty and 

the Superstar 97:83-91 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 

Saint Dominic (1935 Talk by Cardinal 
Pacelli) 84:168-185 

- Sr. Mary of the Trinity, trans. (Menlo Park) 
The "Pleiades" and the "God of War" in a 

Dominican Sky 05:111-115 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 
Star Dust 93:51-54 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 

Schillebeeckx, Edward, 1914- 
Understanding the Contemporary Theology 
of the Human Person 96:10-20 

- Hilkert, OP, Sr. Mary Catherine 

Silence 

Monastic Silence - a Mosaic 

93:2-7 - Sr. Mary Agnes (Buffalo) 

The Observances of Silence and Enclosure 
00:36-46 - Sr. Claire (N Glfd) 

Silence: a Monastic Tradition for Today 
83:143-150 - Anonymous (Summit) 

Silence and Community 89/Fall:54-57 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Buffalo) 
Silence in the Monastic Tradition 

89/Fall:51-53 - Sr. Joanne (N. Glfd) 
Vacate et Videte 89/Fall:58-64 

- Sr. Mary Margaret (Buffalo) 



Sacraments - Reconciliation 

Mandatum 2001: the Need for Beauty 

01:1-2 - Sr. Mary Rose (Farmington H.) 

Sadness 

SEE 
Sorrow 
Suffering 



Simplicity 

Holiness, Simplicity and Communio in Dominican 
Monastic Life 05:31-40 

- Corbett, OP, John 

Solitude - Religious aspects 

Community and Solitude 

90:39-44 - Sr. Susan H. (N. Glfd) 
Do You Not Know That You Are a Temple 

of God? 97:3-8 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 



104 



The Role of Solitude in Dominican 

Contemplative Life 85:47-52 

-Sr. Denise Marie (Sr. Mary Bernard (Summit) 
Sorrow 
The Gift of Sadness in the Contemplative Life 

05:79-90 - Goergen, OP, Donald 

Spiritual life (works on the 
supernatural or inner life) 

Mid-Life Novitiate: My Occasion for Profound 
Human Growth 98:81-88 

- Sr. Marina (Summit) 

St. Catherine and Holy Discretion 99:73-83 

- Sr. Mary Joseph (Farmington H.) 

Until Jesus Be Formed in You: 
a Marian Short Story 98:91-96 

- Sr. Mary of the Sacred Heart (Marbury) 

Spiritual reading 

Reading and Prayer -- Thomas Camelot, OP 
85:112-120 
-Sr. Mary Regina, trans. (W. Springfield) 

Spirituality 

The Inner Mountain 83:14-19 

- Sr. Miriam (Elmira) 

Study 

Approaches to Our Charism 

II. Study: a Heritage Re-gained 80:32-38 

- Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 
Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 

of the Order of Preachers: Part III 00:118-143 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 

Dominican Monastic Values: a Personal Witness 
05:104-1 10 - Sr. Marie Tersidis (Lufkin) 

Dominican Study and the Experience of God 
84:53-67 -Walsh, OP, Liam 

"Eat the Book:" Study in the Lives of Dominican 
Preachers and Contemplatives 05:41-64 

- Murray, OP, Paul 

Faith, Theology and Contemplation 

98:97-100 - Sr. Daria (N. Glfd) 
Formed by the Word, Taught by the Spirit, 

We Dare to Study 92:100-110 

- Sr. Susan H. (N. Glfd) 

Is Theological Study Important 

for Dominican Contemplatives? 95:23-27 

- Sr. Mary Theresa (Buffalo) 
Prayer, Study, and the Life of Withdrawal 

92:51-72 - Barron, OP, William 



The Relationship of Study to Our 

Dominican Contemplative Life 80:26-30 

- Sr. Maria Christi (N. Glfd) 

St. Gregory of Nyssa and the Four Dominican 
Observances 01:9-17 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Lufkin) 

Some Spiritual Aspects of Study 91 :47-49 

- Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 
Study and Contemplative Prayer 

- Fabio Giardini, OP author 91:43-46 

- Sr. Maria of the Cross, trans. (Summit) 
Study as a Basis for Prayer 82:108-109 

- Sr. Mary Augustine (Syracuse) 
Study in the Dominican Tradition 85:39-46 

- Sr. Mary of Jesus (Bronx) 
Study in the life of the Dominican Nun 

94:63-67 - Sr. Mary of Jesus (Bronx) 
Study in Our Dominican Monastic Life 

80:41-42 - Sr. Mary of God (N. Glfd) 
Study is a Prayer to Truth: Jesus, pure Truth, 

teach us the Truth 00:72-86 

- Sr. Mary of Jesus (Bronx) 
Theological Study in Dominican 

Contemplative Life 94:55-62 

- Sr. Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella (Farm. H.) 

Theological Study in the Life of Dominican 
Contemplative Nuns 92: 1 1 1 -1 1 9 

- Sr. Mary of the Trinity (Farmington H.) 
Theology and Contemplation in the 

Dominican Tradition 95:81-84 

- Sr. Mary Vincent (Farmington H.) 
The Top Priority 93:25-26 

- Sr. Mary of Jesus Crucified (Buffalo) 

Suffering 

The Gift of Sadness in the Contemplative Life 
05:79-90 - Goergen, OP, Donald 



Television 

Parting With Illusion: the Challenge of 

Monastic Formation in an Age of Immediacy 
96:52-60 - Corbett, OP, John 

Teresa Mary Ortego/a of Olmedo, 191 7-? 

First Glimpse of Mary Maria Teresa (sic) 87:61-71 

- Sr. Mary of Holy Cross, trans. (Buffalo) 
Mother Teresa Maria Ortego of Olmedo, 

Chapter Two 89/Spring:76-85 

- Sr. Mary of the Holy Cross, trans. (Buffalo) 



105 



I 



Teresa of Avila. The Interior Castle 

Elizabeth of the Trinity and The Interior Castle 
85:98-1 11 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 

Theologians 

Yves Congar: Theologian and Contemplative 

94:89-92 - Sr. Mary Regina (Langley) 
Lonergan: The Basis of Lonergan's Theological 
Method 94:86-88 

-Sr. Mary Of the Precious Blood (Buffalo) 
In Love With the Universe: a Brief Introduction 
to the Work of Bernard Lonergan 97:59-78 

- Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farm H. 

Theology 

Theology and Contemplation in the 
Dominican Tradition 95:81-84 

- Sr. Mary Vincent (Farm. H.) 

Time and the Timeless Doctor 99:38-43 

- Sr. Mary Regina (Lufkin) 
Understanding the Contemporary Theology 

of the Human Person 96:10-20 

- Hilkert, OP, Sr. Mary Catherine 



Community as the Image of the Trinity 
90:5-10 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

An Exploration of Fr. George Tavard's 
Trina Deltas 99:48-57 

- Sr. Mary of the Savior (Farm. H.) 
The Mystery of Divine Communion and the 

Monastic Life 00:3-16 - DiNoia, OP, A. 
Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: 
Parts I and II Matthew & Luke 02-03:29-48 
-Sr. Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella (Farm. H.) 
Snapshots of the Trinity in the Four Gospels: 
Parts III and IV Mark & John 06-49-67 
--Sr. Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella (Farm. H.) 

Trust in God 

Do Not Be Afraid: Facing the Millennium 
with Trust 99:44-47 

- Sr. Mary of the Eucharist (W. Springfield) 

Truth 

Truth 85:53-55 

- Sr. Mary Joseph (Los Angeles) 



I 



I 



I 
I 
I 

I 



Thomas Aquinas, St., 1225-1274 

Aquinas's Theology of Trinitarian Mission 
and the Dialogue of Catharine of Siena 
95:60-66 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Contemplative Life, Saint Thomas and 
Passive Entertainment 95:55-59 

- Sr. Mary Augustine (Los Angeles) 
Discovering Aquinas by Aidan Nichols [Book 

Review Essay] 02-03:69-77 

- Sr. Thomas Mary (N. Guilford) 
Scripture, Theology and the Nature of Doctrine 

in Aquinas and in the Thought of the 
Post-liberal Theologian George Lindbeck 
94:93-101 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

Thomism 

Scripture, Theology and the Nature of Doctrine 
in Aquinas and in the Thought of the 
Postliberal Theologian George Lindbeck 
94:93-101 
-Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 

The State of Thomism Today 98:103-104 

- Sr. Mary Catharine (Summit) 
Thomism Today 95:93-95 

- Sr. Mary Margaret (Perry) (Farm. H.) 



Virtues, theological (See individually: Faith, 
Hope, Charity, Love) 

Vocation, Religious 

The Mystery of a Religious Vocation 

05:98-103 - Sr. Mary Rose Dominic (Summit) 

Vows 

Dominican Monastic Profession 
83:132-135 - Sr. Claire (N. Glfd) 

Vows (Obedience) 

St. Gregory of Nyssa and the Four Dominican 
Observances 01:9-17 

- Sr. Mary Thomas (Lufkin) 

Vows (see also Evangelical Counsels) 

Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 
of the Order of Preachers: Part II 99:85-125 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 



Trinity 

Aquinas's Theology of Trinitarian Mission 
and the Dialogue of Catharine of Siena 
95:60-66 - Sr. Jean Marie (Langley) 



106 



w 



Wisdom 

Preambles to Government 

86:83-95 - Sr. Mary Francis (Farmington H.) 

Women 

St. Dominic and Women: a Dialogue With the 
Modern World 98:69-80 

- Sr. Mary (Margaret) Emmanuella (Farm. H.) 

Work - Moral and ethical aspects 

The Workaholic Syndrome and Original Sin 
92:86-99 - Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 

Work - Religious aspects (See also: Manual 
Labor) 

Commentary on the Constitutions of the Nuns 
of the Order of Preachers: Part III 00:118-143 

- S. Marie Ancilla, author (Lourdes) 

- Sr. Mary Thomas, trans. (Buffalo) 
Toward a Monastic Spirituality of Work 

86:59-68 

- Sr. Maria Agnes (Summit) 
Work and the Inroads of Activism 

92:81-85 - Sr. Mary Amata (Washington) 
Work: Its Meaning and Value for 

Contemporary Dominican Monastic Life 

92:27-37 - Sr. Mary Magdalen (Langley) 
Work and the Dominican Monastic Tradition 

86:51-58 - Sr. Mary of Christ (Los Angeles) 



107 



GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS 
TO DOMINICAN MONASTIC SEARCH (2006-2007) 



We encourage al! who can do so to write for Dominican Monastic Search. The deadline 
for manuscripts is December 31 st for the Spring issue of 2007. Appropriate subjects include 
scripture, theology, philosophy, spirituality, Dominican life, and the liberal arts insofar as they 
contribute to our Dominican vocation. 

Before submission to the editors, all articles must be received by your local contact 
person. She is asked to see that they are proofread for spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc., 
and if the author cannot do so, to type them according to the guidelines. But she will encourage 
the author at all times, and pass on the article to the DMS editors. 

Manuscripts submitted in typewriting or computer printout should be clear, single- 
spaced, and on one side of the paper only. Please follow as many as possible of the computer 
guidelines given below, even if you are using a typewriter. The editors may deem an article not 
suitable for this particular publication {DMS), but dialogue will always be cordial in any 
observations or changes thought necessary. 



FORMAT FOR SUBMISSION ON DISK 

Since DMS employs a uniform style, we welcome the submission of your manuscript on 
disk, always accompanied by a printout. When possible use The Chicago Manual of Style 
(15 th Edition). Please follow this format: 

PROGRAM: Word Perfect 6,8, or 9 may be used or Microsoft Word, up to Microsoft 2000. 

MARGINS, etc.; 1" top and bottom. 1.12 on left and right sides. Full justification. Set 
Widow/Orphan protect ON. Use no printed page numbers; on the back of each page pencil its 
number. 

FONT: Use the ARIAL font. Use either 1 1 or 12 pt. size for body copy, 10 pt. size is suitable for 
Endnotes. 

TITLE: Position the title against the left margin, 13 PT. BOLD. Put author's name below, in font 
size of body copy, using the FLUSH RIGHT format to secure it to that margin. Add your 
monastery's location beneath author's name. 

SPACING: For TITLE, triple space between author's monastery and beginning of article. Single- 
space the body copy. Double-space between paragraphs and before major headings. 

NOTES: Use ENDNOTES, Follow current academic form. L & R margins of 1.12" as above. 
These margins and the ARIAL font must be entered into the program's "Document Style" in 
order to affect the endnotes (Click: "Format/Styles/Document Style/Edit"). Any font size smaller 
than the article must be entered into an endnote style. (Click "Insert/Endnote 
Number/Options/Advanced Note"). Omit "p" or "pp" for page numbers; give only the number of 
the page. 



108 



MONASTERIES OF THE NUNS OF NORTH AMERICA 



CORPUS CHRISTI MONASTERY 

1230 Lafayette Avenue 

Bronx, NY 10474-5399 718-328-6996 

MONASTERY OF OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY 

335 Doat Street 

Buffalo, NY 14211-2199 

mtnop@aol.com 716-892-0066 

MONASTERY OF THE PERPETUAL ROSARY 

1 500 Haddon Avenue 

Camden, NJ 08103-31 12 856-342-8340 

MONASTERY OF MARY THE QUEEN 

1310 W. Church Street 

Elmira, NY 14905-1998 

elmiraop@localnet.com 607-734-9506 

MONASTERY OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT 
29575 Middlebelt Road 
Farmington Hills, MI 48334-231 1 
opnunsfh@sbcglobal.net 248-626-832 1 

MONASTERY OF THE IMMACULATE 

HEART OF MARY 

1834 Lititz Pike 

Lancaster, PA 17601-6585 

monlan@aol.com 717-569-2104 

MONASTERY OF THE ANGELS 

1 977 Carmen Avenue 

Los Angeles, CA 90069-4098 

srpia@algxmail.com 323-466-2186 

MONASTERY OF THE INFANT JESUS 

1501 Lotus Lane 
Lufkin, TX 75904-2699 

miitx@juno.com 936-634-4233 

MONASTERY OF ST. JUDE 

143 County Road 20, East: P.O. Box 170 

Marbury, AL 36051-0170 205-755-1322 

CORPUS CHRISTI MONASTERY 
2 1 5 Oak Grove Avenue 
Menlo Park, CA 94025-3272 
nunsmenlo@comcast.net 650-322- 1 80 1 

MONASTERY OF OUR LADY OF GRACE 

1 1 Race Hill Road 

North Guilford, CT 06437-1099 203-457-0599 



MONASTERY OF OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY 

543 Springfield Avenue 

Summit, NJ 07901-4498 

nunsopsummit@op.org 908-273-1228 

DOMINICAN NUNS OF THE PERPETUAL 

ROSARY 

802 Court Street 

Syracuse, NY 1 3208 31 5-47 1 -6762 

ST. DOMINIC'S MONASTERY 

P.O.BOX 539 

West Springfield, MA 1 089 20 1 -725-5605 

Relocating to Linden, VA in the Spring of 2007 

MONASTERY OF THE MOTHER OF GOD 

1430 Riverdale Street 
West Springfield, MA 01089-4698 
monasteryws@aol.com 413-736-3639 

LES MONIALES DOMINICAINES 

1 140 rue Frontenac, C.P.479 

Berthierville, Quebec JOK 1AO 

Canada 

info@monialesdominicaines.qc.ca 450-836-1850 



ROSARY MONASTERY 
No. 2 St. Ann's Road 
Port of Spain, TRINIDAD 



809-624-7648 



FOUNDATIONS 



QUEEN OF PEACE MONASTERY 
9383 222nd Street 
Langley,BCVlM3T7 
Canada 



peacenun@shaw.ca 



604-513-3665 



MONASTERY OF OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY 
Rosaryhill, Bulao, Cainta, Rizal, 1900 
Philippines 
op_cainta@edsamail.com.ph 

QUEEN OF ANGELS MONASTERY 

237 MacArthur Hwy, Bocaue 

3018Bulacan 

Philippines 

quamop@digitelone.com 



Graphic Design: 
Sr. Clara Marie, OP - Farmington Hills, 

ISSN 1527-263X